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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 22, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 16, 1970

Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 22, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 16, 1970

Date: April 16, 1970
Creator: Hinkle, Robert N.
Description: Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 23, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 23, 1970

Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 23, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 23, 1970

Date: April 23, 1970
Creator: Hinkle, Robert N.
Description: Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 24, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 30, 1970

Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 24, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 30, 1970

Date: April 30, 1970
Creator: Hinkle, Robert N.
Description: Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 25, Ed. 1 Saturday, May 2, 1970

Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 25, Ed. 1 Saturday, May 2, 1970

Date: May 2, 1970
Creator: Hinkle, Robert N.
Description: Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Brewer Home]

[The Brewer Home]

Date: April 4, 1976
Creator: unknown
Description: The Brewer home on East Mountain is shown here, from a picture taken April 4, 1976. It is visible from most of North Oak Avenue. Originally the Murphy Home, the building underwent many renovations during the period of Mr. Murphy's residence. Mr. Murphy was a contractor who built many buildings in Mineral Wells, including the Mineral Wells High School (1914) and the third First Baptist Church.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Brick Factory]

[The Brick Factory]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The abundant clay in and around Palo Pinto County was recognized around the turn of the 20th century as a source of raw material for brick manufacturing. Rejected fine coal from the area's coal mines furnished heat to fire the clay and bake it into brick. This brick factory in far western Parker County, near the Rock Creek coal mine, was a major industry in Mineral Wells. The factory was first opened on January 21 of 1921. The factory is in full operation in this photograph, with train cars on the tracks and bricks stacked along the rail area awaiting shipment. Area-made bricks were used to build the seawall at Galveston after the disastrous hurricane of 1900, to pave both the highway from Mineral Wells to Ft. Worth as well as many of the streets in in that city, and to pave Congress Avenue in Austin.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Brick Highway Between Mineral Wells and Weatherford]

[The Brick Highway Between Mineral Wells and Weatherford]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The 1936 ribbon-cutting ceremony to open the new brick highway between Weatherford and Mineral Wells, now U.S. Highway 180, is depicted here. This photograph was taken just seconds before the photograph found on page 97 of A. F. Weaver's book, "TIME WAS..." 2nd edition. Some of the dignitaries in the photograph are Allen Wallace, W.A. Ross, Pat Corrigan and Paul Woods. The new highway to Weatherford began at the 900 block of East Hubbard, and the brick was hand-laid by two strong Negro men.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Brick Road East of Mineral Wells]

[The Brick Road East of Mineral Wells]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The brick highway (emphatically not yellow brick!)east of Mineral Wells (the Bankhead Highway) was the nation's first transcontinental highway, beginning at milepost 0 on the steps of the Capitol in Washington, D.C. and ending at San Diego, California. Bricks for it in this area were made in Thurber, Texas (on the Palo Pinto/Erath county line). All bricks were laid by two (some say one) black masons. Bricks made in Thurber were also used to build the seawall at Galveston after the disastrous hurricane of 1900, to pave the streets of Fort Worth, and even Congress Avenue in Austin, Texas.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Bridge at the Old Elmhurst Park]

[The Bridge at the Old Elmhurst Park]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: This picture illustrates the swinging bridge crossing Pollard Creek in Elmhurst Park. Note the Mineral Wells Electric Railway street car (trolley) in the background. Elmhurst Park was located about where SW 25th Street and SW 25th Avenue are located today. Both Elmhurst Park and the streetcar operated from about 1907 to 1913. The dam over Pollard Creek was broached, and the lake was drained after the park closed. A housing development was built on the old Elmhurst Park grounds during World War II. Writing on the photograph dates it to 1907, shortly after the Park opened, and identifies the two visitors on the bridge as Allen and Charles-- apparently father and son.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
A Brief History or a Statement of Facts of Mineral Wells, Texas

A Brief History or a Statement of Facts of Mineral Wells, Texas

Date: September 24, 1921
Creator: Berry, H. M.
Description: A booklet about the history of Mineral Wells, Texas, from 1881 to 1921.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library