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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Children With Bicycle and Hoop,]
Dated "Jan 10, 1919", this picture was contained in an envelope postmarked "Aug. 4 '75", and addressed to A. F. Weaver Photography from Charles W. [Windell] Simonds. Handwriting on the envelope indicates it was from a short-wave "Ham' radio operator correspondent and friend of Mr. Weaver. Notes on the envelope indicate the picture was probably taken by the correspondent's father, Clarence Winfield Simonds. The sign on the tree at the left edge of the picture indicates this was the Vance Villa (Rooming House) in a residential part of town. (Vance Villa is listed in the 1914 City Director of Mineral Wells at 811 N. College, which is now NW 5th Avenue.) Note the hoop held by the child on the left, while the boy on the right appears to be holding a unicycle. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29457/
[A Christmas Card from Boyce Ditto]
Christmas card sent to Mrs. Weaver, signed "Boyce Ditto." The front cover has a picture of greenery decorated with red bells and silver balls; at the top it says "To A Special Friend." The inside has a similar illustration in the center with text on either side. The text on the left says, "Friends as fine/ as you are/ Don't often come/ one's way./ And special times/ like Christmas/ Don't happen every day." The text on the right continues: "And so this/ Christmas greeting/ Is coming to extend/ This wish--/ 'A Merry Christmas/ To a very/ special friend!'" texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16331/
[The Christmas Rush With the First Airmail]
The sorting room of the "old post office" at Christmas time. Airmail had just arrived in Mineral Wells. The caption "1916" is written in the top margin of photograph. Air Mail arrived in Mineral Wells in two distinct eras. The first was from the 1916 date on this photograph to about the beginning of World War II. The mail route of that era was marked by rotating signal beacons for night flight, and low frequency radio directional beams with "A" (dot-dash) and "N" (dash-dot) Morse Code signals to indicate straying, right or left, from the true course between landing fields during flight operations. These deliveries were suspended during World War II, and improved service was resumed for a period of time a few years after the war. At one time during the 1950's-1960's, Trans Texas Airways operated from Shreveport,Louisiana. to El Paso, Texas It made scheduled daily stops in Mineral Wells for both passengers and mail. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16137/
City Meat Market
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60946/
[The City Nestled Among the Hills]
This picture was taken from East Mountain, from a site above and left (south) of the former Chautauqua (1905-1912.) Note the Crazy Water Hotel at the left edge of the picture (which opened in 1927 on the corner of North Oak and NW 3rd Streets.) Note also the Nazareth Hospital built by the Crazy Corporation, behind and right of the Crazy. The back of the "WELCOME" (1921 vintage) sign on the south end of this mountain and facing south, is at the immediate middle foreground. This sign was the world's largest non-commercial electric lighted sign when it was donated to the city in 1922 following a Rotary Club of Texas convention. The sign is reputed to be the inspiration for the more publicized "HOLLYWOOD" sign in Los Angeles, California. It is much larger than the photograph suggests. Lesser known sites in the picture are The Hawthorn Drinking Pavilion one block north (right) of Nazareth Hospital and the Crazy Theater, across Oak Avenue, at the right and front of the Crazy. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16217/
[The Clark Residence on N W 4th Ave.]
The W. V. Clark residence on NW 4th Avenue (which was originally called Pecan Street). This photograph was taken in June of 1974. A photograph on page 139 of "TIME WAS..." by A. F. Weaver shows the house to better advantage before foliage of the trees obscured part of it. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16166/
Cliff Home
The Cliff Home, an early Mineral Wells hotel, stood on NE 2nd Street (formerly Coke Street) just east of the head of NE 1st Avenue (formerly Mesquite Street), and the site of the 1912 "Old Post Office" (now the Women's Club.) The hotel burned down, and the Plateau Hotel was built in its place. That hotel, in time, became The Exchange Hotel. It was later converted to the Mineral Wells Sanitarium (or hospital) before it was finally torn down. The significance of the small "E" between "CLIFF" and "HOME" on the sign painted on the roof is unclear. The back of the photograph bears the name "Henry Sikes" (a banker in Graford, and probably the donor of the picture) written in ink, and a business stamp, "S.B. Hall, General Photographer." This picture is found on page 100 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells". texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20315/
[ A Close-up of Calvary Baptist Parsonage]
This home was the parsonage of Calvary Baptist Church in 1975, according to a note on back of the picture. Note the brick crosses worked into the stone-work above the front door and on the chimney. The picture also shows some structural cracks in the native sandstone rockery above the entrance and window, probably indicating foundation damage. There are also some weathered holes in the structurally- sound, but odd, limestone rocks used in construction. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24994/
Co-Operative Market
This photograph appears in A.F. Weaver's book, "Time Was...", second Edition, on page 189. The Co-operative Market was located on the lot in the 200 block of S. Oak Street, where the present [2010] Fire and Police Departments are located. The sign indicates that women and girls were the market's anticipated customers. The street is paved and curbed, so the photograph was taken sometime after city streets were paved in 1914. The facade of a building behind the CO-OP sign bears a "City Feed Market" - "Hay, Oats, Corn . . ." legend. Note the contemporary automobiles in the foreground. The one on the left (edge of picture) appears to be a WHIPPET touring car. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20447/
[Col. and Mrs. W. Riess (W. R.) Austin]
Colonel and Mrs. W. Riess (W. R.) Austin are depicted here, from an image taken from a 1902 photograph. Colonel Austin is mentioned on page 54 of "Time Was..." second edition. A. F. Weaver says, "...the Austin Well, established by Col. W. R. Austin, who came from Kentucky to Palo Pinto County about 1880. Austin settled on Staggs Prairie, where he farmed and ranched. Then he became interested in mineral waters when he had an eye infection that affected his sight. So he moved to Mineral Wells, and the constant use of the waters restored his sight. He engaged in the dairy business, at first; but later entered the mineral water production field, establishing the Austin Well, which was later operated by his son-in-law, Tom Sims." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20257/
[Cole's House of Flowers]
Cole's House of Flowers was built on this location in 1980, after a fire had destroyed the Davidson Hardware and the Damron Hotel buildings in 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29854/
[The Colonel Boykin Home - 1301 SE 4th Avenue]
The Colonel Boykin Home, at 1301 SE 4th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas appears to show neo-classical elements, along with evidence of later remodeling. This home was built in 1905 by Colonel Walter H. Boykin, owner of the Fairfield Inn. It was later purchased by William Whipple Johnson who, with his brother, Harvey, originally developed the coal mines in Thurber, Texas. Johnson opened the Rock Creek Mine in far western Parker County (after selling the mines at Thurber) and lived in this home while he operated it. The Will Smith family owned the house during the 1930's The house was converted to a rooming house during World War II, and abandoned in later years. The abandoned house was bought in 1975 by Morris Wayne Garrett and his wife, Darlene. They salvaged artifacts from several historical buildings in Mineral Wells that were in the process of being demolished: A beveled-glass door from the old Miller Hotel, large claw-footed bathtubs from the Jerome Hotel, French doors and tall windows from the old Firemen's club at Lake Mineral Wells, and baluster rails which were once part of the Hexagon Hotel, in their efforts to restore the home to its former grandeur. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16160/
Colonial Hotel
The Colonial Hotel at 115 W. Hubbard Street was built by rancher J.T. Holt for his second wife who would not live in the country. The hotel was traded to Agnew and Bessie Damron for a ranch about 1917, and its name was changed to The Damron Hotel. The popular hotel burned down December 22, 1975 along with several other adjoining businesses. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60882/
Come to Mineral Wells
Shown here is a pamphlet from the Chamber of Commerce, describing the healthful benefits of a visit to Mineral Wells, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16342/
The Commercial Hotel
The Commercial Hotel, one of the early hotels in Mineral Wells, was located on S. Oak Avenue, where the Mineral Wells Fire Department is now located. This picture may be found on page 101 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20318/
Company 1, 4th Texas Infantry
Typed under this picture is the legend: "FIFTY YEARS AGO -- Co. 1, 4th Texas Infantry, was patrolling the Mexican Border. The company's home base was in Mineral Wells. Later it was called into federal service and designated as Co. 144th Infantry, 36th Division, with combat duty in France on the Meuse-Argonne Campaign and the Argonne Forest. In the picture is the company pet donkey, about to consume a copy of the Daily Index, on the left is Bill Cameron and right is Spencer Heath. The picture was made in Marathon, Texas in 1916." Bill Cameron was employed in various capacities by the "Mineral Wells Index" newspaper for many years. At the time of his death, 1976, he was its business manager. The image of the donkey chewing on the copy of the "Index" is a favorite picture shown in the "Index" to this day [2013]. It remains the subject of raucous humor in Mineral Wells. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29817/
[Confiscated Whiskey Stills]
Nick Chandler & Gib Abernathy, officials of the government, have detected, and presumably are about to destroy, illegal whiskey distilling apparatus confiscated during the Great Depression of the 1930's. Abernathy was the Palo Pinto County Sheriff at the time, and also the father of Bill Ray Abernathy. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24981/
[Construction of Oxford Hotel]
Pictured here is the construction of the foundation of the Oxford Hotel (including the First State Bank & Trust Company) in 1906. The hotel was located at Oak and Hubbard Streets. H. N. Frost, father of Cleo T. Bowman and grandfather of Frost Bowman, built the Oxford and founded the bank, which was located on the west side of the building. Some few of the buildings pictured are still [2014] standing. The hotel was owned by the estate until the late 1920's. The Oxford Hotel met its doom by fire in later years. This photograph is featured in "Time was in Mineral Wells" on page 147. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39208/
[Construction of the Malsby Dairy]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60942/
[The Construction of the Post Office]
Written on front of picture is the partial holograph legend: ".ade from the North east ...ner looking Southwest made May the 3rd 1912" It shows the construction of what would eventually be the third Post Office at 201 N.E. 2nd Street. A shear-legs is shown on the extreme left. The workers have clearly stopped work for the taking of the photograph, which is featured in "Time Once Was in Mineral Wells" on page 150. The building now [2014] houses the Women's Club. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39177/
[The Construction Site of the Mineral Wells Savings and Loan, 1 of 3, The Baker Hotel is in the Background]
This series of photographs was taken in 1975, during the construction of the Mineral Wells Savings and Loan at 101 SE 1st Avenue. The Howard Brothers Department Store was an early occupant of the site. Demolition of the Howard Building began March 17, 1975 to make room for the Savings and Loan. A new First State Bank currently occupies this entire city block. A good view of the south side of the Baker Hotel is visible in the background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29421/
[The Construction Site of the Mineral Wells Savings and Loan, 2 of 3: A Piggy Wiggly Is in the Background]
The construction of the Mineral Wells Savings and Loan, at 101 SE 1st Avenue in 1975, was documented in this series of photographs. The Howard Building, the first of the complex of Howard Brothers Department Stores, had been built on this location in the early 1900's. Demolition of the Howard Building began March 17, 1975, to make room for the Savings and Loan. The Piggly Wiggly Grocery Store (at the site of Mineral Wells' first Post Office) and the Green Stamp Store are visible across SE 1st Avenue, south of the Savings and Loan. The new First State State currently covers the entire city block at this location. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29420/
[The Construction Site of the Mineral Wells Savings and Loan, 3 of 3: The East Side of the Construction]
This series of photographs of the construction of Mineral Wells Savings and Loan was taken in 1975. Demolition of the Howard Building began March 17, 1975, to make room for the Savings and Loan. D.M. Howard was the first of five brothers to arrive from North Carolina. He later sent for his other brothers to establish the Howard Brothers Department Stores complex in the early 1900's. The Baker Hotel, directly across E. Hubbard north of the Savings and Loan, is seen to the left of the picture. Across SE 1st Street, to the south, were the Piggly Wiggly Grocery store (at the site of Mineral Wells' first Post Office) and the S & H Green Stamp store. The First State Bank now occupies this entire city block. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29419/
Convention Hall
The Convention Hall, built in 1925 to accommodate the 1925 West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention. An ice plant and electric plant built by Galbraith (owner of the Hexagon Hotel) had burned, and the rock foundation was used to build the Convention Hall. Demolition of the building began in 1975. A spokesman for the company tearing down the hall stated that the man who imported the London Bridge to Havasu City, Lake Havasu, Arizona, was interested in purchasing the rock foundation to restore an old fort at the London Bridge facility. This picture is featured in "Mini Edition" of "Time Was..." on page 34. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39233/
The Convention Hall and Its Surroundings
This picture shows the quondam Convention Hall in it glory days after its erection in 1925, and before its demolition in 1976. A house in the (possibly)the Colonial Revival style is visible. Another large house on a hill appears to be in the Neoclassical style. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60953/
[The Convention Hall, Built in 1925]
This photograph shows the Convention Hall, which was built in 1925 to accommodate the 1925 West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention. The lack of signage on the front of the building--along with copious bunting--suggests that the photograph was taken at its dedication. The picture is featured in "Time There Once was", page 164. The Convention Hall was later demolished. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39236/
A Convention, West Texas Chamber of Commerce
This photograph shows a view of Mineral Wells from East Mountain. It is inscribed "Convention West Texas Chamber of Commerce." A companion picture is dated "May 4-5-6, 1925". The train depot is in the left middle background. The church in the middle foreground is the First Methodist Church, and immediately behind and above it is the Lamar Bath House and Hotel. The home to the left (east) of the Methodist Church was the home of Pharmacist C. Y. Yeager. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20344/
[A Corner of N.W. 1st Avenue and 9th Street]
This picture may be found on page 138 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. The caption says, "George P. Barber residence, built in 1907 at the corner of NW 1st Avenue and 9th Street..." Dr. Barber, an early Doctor and financier in the city, joined with George W. Slaughter to donate land for Elmwood Cemetery. He established Barber's Addition (a housing development) in the north part of the City, and built a small lake for the City's first municipal water supply. The legend on the poster attached to the tree in front of the house begins, "Free Mineral Water." The rest of the sign remains obscure. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20266/
[A Corner of Oak Avenue and East Hubbard]
This picture shows the northeast corner of the intersection of Hubbard Street (US Hwy. 180) and Oak Avenue (US Hwy. 281), the center of downtown Mineral Wells. In this picture are The First State Bank, The Gentleman's Closet, and Lorene's Fabrics. The First State Bank began at this location, with Leon Cowan as president and Tony Street and Leon Groves as vice-presidents. The City National Bank was once located here, but moved to their new location at 1900 E. Hubbard Street. The Gentleman's Closet and Lorene's Fabrics occupied a newly-remodeled building to the right (east) of the bank. George's Men's Shop was one of the businesses in the building across Oak Avenue to the left and west of the First State Bank. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29851/
[The Crazy Bottling Plant]
The Crazy Water Bottling Plant and Crazy Water Tower are shown here. The plant was built in 1919 at a cost of $85,000, and is located at 300 NW 7th Street. The location was once the original site of the Sangcura-Sprudel Wells Pavilion. The Sangcura-Sprudel Pavilion was moved and converted into a rooming house, which burned in 1973. Notice the home in the background. The date on back of photograph is given as 1940. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29968/
[The Crazy Box Factory Crew 1940]
A. F. Weaver, Sr. (seated on the left) raised money--just before World War II--to build the new building just behind the Crazy Box Factory. He is pictured here with the staff of the building. The Polluck Paper and Box Company took over the plant right after the war. It later became the St. Regis Packaging. The photograph dates to 1940. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39221/
[The Crazy Crystal Bottling Plant]
A picture of the interior of the Crazy Bottling Plant, ladies are shown bottling Crazy Fiz, a copyrighted beverage created by infusing cooled mineral water with carbon dioxide. The men shown here appear to be checking the process in preparation for the bottling of the Crazy Fiz, while the ladies bottle and crate the finished product for shipment. Note the plant's scrupulous cleanliness, and the fact that all employees are dressed in white. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29960/
[Crazy Crystals]
Men and women are shown here packaging Crazy Water Crystals. Mineral water was evaporated, and the resulting crystal deposits were gathered and packaged in various sizes for shipment throughout the United States. Written on back of this photograph is: "Pkg Crazy Crystals 1930's" and the name "Buster." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29969/
Crazy Crystals in Parade 1936
This photograph shows two vehicles in the Crazy Crystals Parade in 1936. One of the vehicles (a van) is decorated with Crazy Crystals Shipping Boxes. It is covered with streamers on the hood, door handle, the running board, and all the tires--including its spare. The car following it is black with white panels in the doors. It also has streamers on the hood. Apart from the printed legend on the base of the photograph, there is no further information available about this photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39220/
[Crazy Fiz]
Products were developed to satisfy the public's search for health during the heyday of the Mineral Wells Health Industry. One of these was Crazy Fiz. Carbon dioxide was infused into mineral water under pressure to create a "Sparkling water" drink labeled "Crazy Fiz." The women in this photograph of the Crazy Water Crystal plant are packaging the Crazy Fiz for distribution. On the back of the photograph is printed "Crazy Fiz 1930's." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29971/
[The Crazy Flats and First Crazy Hotel]
A view of early Mineral Wells from East Mountain shows the Crazy Flats in the foreground, and the first Crazy Hotel at the left, at the rear of it. The small building at the right, rear of the Crazy Flats housed the "Crazy Woman's Well" that contributed the generic "Crazy Water" name to the local mineral water. Crazy Flats, the second Crazy Drinking Pavilion with "Rooms for Rent" on the second floor, was built in 1909. The first Crazy Hotel was built in two sections: The first section, at the left rear of Crazy Flats, was built in 1912, and the second section, left of it, was built in 1914, and joined to the first with a common lobby. The low building to the left of Crazy Flats and in front of the Hotel was the Crazy Bath House and Drugstore. A fire started in the drugstore March 15, 1925, and destroyed the entire city block. The second Crazy Hotel, covering this entire city block, opened in 1927. The original Crazy Well is now situated in the sidewalk at the northwest corner of the Hotel with a cover over it. The second Crazy Hotel is now [2008] a Retirement Home. It was forcibly closed down in 2010. Also visible in the picture above the "Crazy" Complex and below the gap between West Mountain and South Mountain are the "Old High School", the "Little Rock School" and the Fourth Ward School. Four blocks behind and above the Hotel in the picture, the domed First Presbyterian Church is visible midway between the "Crazy Block" and the schools. The Roman Catholic church with its white steeple is at the far upper right, and the second Carlsbad Pavilion is across First Avenue, directly to the west (right rear) of the Crazy Flats. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29442/
[The Crazy Flats Fire]
A note on back of photograph states,"Crazy Water flats fire 1925, March 15th. Picture taken from NE Corner on Oak". Thelma Hart's name appears on back of the picture, which was possibly taken by her husband, as his name, Lawrence, also appears. The picture is included in A. F. Weaver's book, "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells," on page 18. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29445/
[The Crazy Gang Bus]
A radio show, broadcast at noon and advertising Crazy Water Crystals over the Texas Quality Network, became so popular that the radio gang found themselves in great demand for personal appearances. To accommodate their audiences, the band traveled in their own bus, shown here. On the back of the photograph is stamped "A. F. Weaver Photography 412 N.Oak Avenue Mineral Wells, Texas 76067." Dated: 1940. Please note: ZIP codes were not in existence in 1940. Its appearance here with the date of 1940 cannot be easily explained. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29973/
Crazy Hotel
A postcard of the first Crazy Hotel, looking west-northwest, with part of a park visible at its east side is shown here. The photograph was given to A.F. Weaver by Margaret Tompkins. The entrance to the Crazy Hotel faced south on 100 NW 3rd Street, which is on the left side in this picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29812/
Crazy Hotel
The east side of the second Crazy Hotel in the 400 block of N. Oak Avenue. Across NE 3rd. street, to the left, is Renfro's Drugs. The low building on the right is the Hotel's drinking pavilion, and has a sign on it proclaiming a public auction of homes, business sites and farm land to take place January 20-21-22. Cars, of the late 1930's, are double-parked and visible in the middle of the street along the east side of the Crazy. (Head-in angle parking in Mineral Wells was changed to parallel parking in 1938, shortly before America was drawn into World War II.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29815/
[The Crazy Hotel]
This pictures shows the east side of the Crazy Hotel, which opened in 1927, and occupies the entire west side of the 400 block of N. Oak Avenue. The Crazy is now [2008] a retirement home. Across N. Oak Avenue (the main street in the picture) and on the right (east) of the Crazy, is the building (with the Community Aerial Cable Company sign) that once housed Stoker Pontiac. It is now [2008] occupied by Bennett's Office Supply. The Grand Theater (originally the Crazy Theater at 400 N. Oak, and now [2008] The Faith Covenant Church) can be seen at the far end of that block. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29963/
[The Crazy Hotel after the Fire of 1925]
A handwritten note on the back of the photograph identifies the picture as "Crazy Hotel southside after fire of March 15, 1925." Shown is the skeleton of the first Crazy Hotel, after a fire destroyed the entire Crazy "complex." The original hotel complex consisted of the two adjoined hotel sections with a common lobby, the Crazy Flats (a drinking pavilion with rooms for rent), a Bath House, and a drugstore (in which the fire started). The second Crazy Hotel opened two years later, in 1927. It covers the entire city block formerly occupied by the complex which it replaced. The famous second Crazy Hotel of the booming 1930's and 1940's is now [2008] a retirement hotel, that was forcibly closed down in 2010. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29446/
[The Crazy Hotel Barber Shop]
This photograph shows the barber Shop in the Crazy Hotel in 1974. "Shoe Shine Boy" Leon Cross is shown seated at his shoe-shine stand. Leon worked in the First Crazy Hotel before it burned in 1925, and (in 1974) he had been employed by the hotel in various capacities since. The new Crazy Hotel opened in 1927. After the Nazareth Hospital closed, rooms on the first two floors of the Crazy were used as a hospital while the new Palo Pinto General Hospital was under construction. The Crazy Hotel is now [2009]a retirement Home. It was forcibly closed down in 2010. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20426/
[A Crazy Hotel Brochure]
This photograph illustrates a fold-out brochure of the Crazy Hotel with various scenic views of things to see and do around the city, along with different modes of transportation to and from Mineral Wells. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60934/
[The Crazy Hotel, East Side]
This photograph was taken in front of the Weaver Photography Studio (412 North Oak)in 1974, and looking west across Oak Street to the Crazy Hotel. The east-side entrance to hotel is clearly visible. The picture was taken before the widening of US Highway 281 through town in year 2005. The automobile at the curb was Mr. Weaver's. The entrance to Crazy drinking water pavilion is on the far right of picture, through a hooded door, under a tile-covered shed roof. It is visible above the hood of the automobile in the foreground. The lobby entrance is beyond the pickup truck, under the "Crazy Hotel" sign. Steps that lead to Mr. Weaver's photography studio are on the front left of the picture. The curved effect of the picture comes from the wide-angle, short focal-length lens that Mr. Weaver used to obtain the photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20420/
Crazy Hotel: Formal Opening Menu
This photograph shows a SOUVENIR MENU on the occasion of the formal opening of the Crazy Hotel on March 11, 1927. The hotel, now [2008] a retirement hotel, is still located on the corner of N. Oak Avenue and NW 3rd Street, Mineral Wells, Texas. It was closed as a retirement hotel, under a considerable cloud, in 2012. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38088/
Crazy Hotel from East Mountain
In this view from East Mountain along NE 2nd Street toward West mountain, the West Ward School, Mineral Wells "Old" High School, and the "Little Rock School" are all visible in the upper middle of the picture on this side of the gap between West Mountain and South Mountain. The rebuilt Crazy Hotel is seen in the right middle of the photograph, and construction of the Nazareth Hospital to the northwest of the Hotel is underway at the right of and behind the hotel. Nazareth Hospital was built by the Crazy Hotel as a clinic, but was later sold to a catholic order of nurses and operated as a hospital. (In the early 1960s, two floors of the Crazy Hotel were used as a hospital while the new Palo Pinto General Hospital was being built.) Dr. A.W. Thompson's home(1896)is in the middle foreground of the picture and the Mineral Wells Sanitarium is beyond it. The Cliff House Hotel occupied this site initially, but it burned, and was replaced by the Plateau Hotel. The Plateau Hotel's name was later changed to the Exchange Hotel, and still later it was converted into the Mineral wells Sanitarium, also known as the Hospital. Next to and beyond "the Hospital" is Mineral Wells' (1912) Post office. The photograph was taken shortly after the second Crazy Hotel opened in 1927. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16221/
[The Crazy Hotel in Winter]
The Crazy Water Hotel is shown once again. It appears that the season this photograph was taken is winter, as snow may be seen on the ground. The truck in the photograph appears to be of a type common before 1939. Mineral Wells was a very popular convention city, and the bunting-draped section of the hotel in the foreground probably indicates preparation for a coming convention. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38069/
[The Crazy Hotel Lobby]
This picture shows the First Crazy Hotel Lobby in 1913. The first Crazy Hotel was built in two sections; the first section, which contained this lobby, was built in 1912. The second section was added in 1914, and joined to the first with the two sections sharing this same sky-lighted lobby. A fire on March 15, 1925 destroyed the first Crazy Hotel along with all the other businesses in this block. The second Crazy Hotel, covering the entire city block, opened in 1927. It is now [2008] a retirement home. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29443/
Crazy Hotel, Mineral Wells, Texas
This picture illustrates a postcard of the Crazy Hotel, taken about 1930, well after the "Crazy" burned in 1925. This is a view of the rebuilt hotel, which opened in 1927. It was considered completely up-to-date, and built with solid masonry interior walls to make it fire-proof. The facility is currently [2008] used as a retirement home. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38070/