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[First Presbyterian Church -- 11 of 13: Close Up of the Dome]
This picture is the eleventh in a series of pictures showing architectural details of The First Presbyterian Church. This picture details the dome atop the church in a close-up view. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25023/
[First Presbyterian Church - 12 of 13: Front View]
This is the twelfth picture in a series of pictures showing architectural details of the First Presbyterian Church prior to its demolition. This is a general view of the church from the southwest corner of the building. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25030/
[First Presbyterian Church, 13 of 13 : South Side]
The third in a series of thirteen pictures of the First Presbyterian Church. This picture shows details of the south side of the church. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25009/
[First State Bank & Trust]
Shown here is an interior view of the First State Bank & Trust Company, later known as the State National Bank, located at 102 East Hubbard. This bank was organized in 1906, and it opened on April 17, 1906. It became the State National Bank in 1925. The First National Bank was merged with the State National Bank in 1931. The official name of the institution became First National Bank in 1955. At the desk is H. N. Frost, then president. Standing is W. I. Smith, Vice-President & cashier. The teller is unidentified. The photograph was taken 1921. It is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 147. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39210/
[Fishing at Lake Mineral Wells]
Fishermen stand below a cataract of the spillway of Lake Mineral Wells. The photograph was taken in 1938. On the reverse of the picture is the and-written legend: Picture taken by A. F. Weaver. This picture is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells...." on page 112. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39229/
[Five Women on a Bridge]
The bridge shown here once spanned a stream in downtown Mineral Wells. It was channelized along the northbound Weatherford, Mineral Wells and Northwestern Railroad. The same women may be seen in the photograph "Women in Truck." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20445/
[Formation of OH-23 Helicopters]
Illustrated in this photograph is a formation of OH-23 Helicopters, presumably at Fort Wolters. Information in regard to the occasion of their flight, or any other data on the helicopters,is unfortunately lacking. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39202/
[The Foster Hotel]
A note on the back of this picture identifies it as the Foster House. It was located at 202 NW 6th Street (given in Polk's Directory for 1909 as "202 West Moore", two blocks north of the Crazy Well) and facing 6th Street. It was one block west of the Hexagon House, and within two blocks of other wells. The style of the building appears to be Queen Anne, spindle-work sub-type, with paired gables. The number "2231" is written on the photograph. A railroad ran a main trunk line on the other side of the hotel's block. It was built before 1904 but further history of this early hotel is not known at this time [2008]. Another picture (The Foster Hotel: Second Photograph, which please see) supplies a few more details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20313/
[The Founder of Mineral Wells - Portrait]
This unlabeled photograph appears to be of Judge J. A. Lynch and his third wife, Armanda Sweeny Lynch, possibly at a family reunion. Judge James Alvis Lynch was the founder of Mineral Wells. No identification of the people (numbered) around them appears to survive. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20240/
[Four Golfers at Mineral Wells Country Club - 1930's]
Four unidentified men in golfing knickers (apparently from the early 1930's, to judge by their dress) stand in front of, and across the lake from the original Holiday Hills Country Club house. They are putting on what is now the Number 12 green. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16253/
[Garett & Walton Cold Drinks & Sandwiches]
Shown here are Bill Garrett (left) and Walter Dalton (right), proprietors of Garrett & Walton Cold Drinks & Sandwiches. It was once located at 110 S.E. 1st Street. Th picture was taken around 1920. It may be seen in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 128. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39189/
[A Gazebo in West Park]
A gazebo, built during the 1970-1980's era, is visible through the trees in West City Park. The park is located on US highway 180 (Hubbard Street) where Pollard Creek crosses it--west of downtown Mineral Wells, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20416/
[The Gibson Well]
The Gibson Well was located on the 700 block of NW 2nd Avenue. In 1888, the label on a bottle of "Natural Gibson Well Water" boasted cures for "constipation, rheumatism, female complaints, nervousness, calculi, stomach, liver, kidney & bladder disorders." Please note the crossing of the "WMW&NW RR" tracks and the "Dinky Car" tracks in the left foreground of the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20471/
[Green Cottage]
The "Green Cottage", located at NW 1st Avenue and NW 2nd Street, was built by Tom Green, owner of Green's Livery Stables. This photograph appears on page 102 of "Time Was in Mineral Wells..." by A. F. Weaver. [The people in picture remain unidentified.] texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16205/
[The Ground-breaking for Mineral Wells High School, 1914]
The ground-breaking ceremony for Mineral Wells High School in 1914 is shown here. The school, finished in 1915, was located on the corner of W. Hubbard Street and NW 5th Avenue. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20237/
[A Group of men at Inspiration Point]
A group of businessmen and ranchers are shown at Inspiration Point in the 1920's. From left, they are (unknown); Mr. Henry Penix; Mr. Bowman; Mssrs. Henry and Charlie Fowler. Note the spurs on the boots of the Fowlers, and the cigars in the hands of Mssrs. Penix and Bowman. Inspiration Point, overlooking the Brazos in Southeast Palo Pinto County about ten miles south of Mineral Wells, commands a vast panoramic view of the rugged river valley stretching for miles below the viewer. It was a noted scenic attraction during the heyday of one of America's most popular health resorts. It is not available to the general public at this time, as it is located on private property. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24952/
[A Group Picture]
A picture of a large group of attendees at the Mineral Wells Annual Fair is shown. The picture was taken in the early 1900's at the Dance Pavilion at Elmhurst Park. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16305/
[A Guest Room in the Baker Hotel]
This photograph shows a guest room in the Baker Hotel, when it was operating. Please note the corner sofa, shag carpet, round coffee-table. Please note also the smoking stand at one end of the sofa--an amenity not encountered in modern hotel rooms. The decor suggests the late 1950's or the early 1960's. It is said that the door of the room had an apparatus in it that automatically turned off the lights when the key was turned. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39200/
[Hacks at a Railroad Depot]
Before the ascendancy of automobiles to public popularity, hacks met newcomers at the depot to take them to their favorite hotel or rooming house. This picture is probably typical week-end visitors from the Ft. Worth/Dallas "Metroplex" in Mineral Wells to drink the health-giving mineral water, and take the relaxing baths and massages. The men on the telephone poles were typical of the "spotters" who sought to deliver clients to local hotels and rooming houses. The photograph appears on page 44 of the "Time Was..." Second Edition. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20370/
A Hazy View of Mineral Wells
Photograph of the city of Mineral Wells, Texas, taken from a hill looking down at the buildings. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60955/
[Hell's Gate]
An old channel of the Brazos River cut a gap in a sandstone formation in the Possum Kingdom area. Water from the impounded Possum Kingdom Lake covered the area and created this spectacular scene when the Morris Shepard Dam was built by the W.P.A. for flood control in the late 1930's. For a feel of the magnitude of the vista, please note the two-story home atop the cliff to the right of the photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25101/
[The Hexagon Hotel]
The popular Hexagon Hotel, built in 1897, was the first structure in Mineral Wells to be electrically-lit. Electricity was supplied by a DC power plant next door. It was located at 701 N. Oak, and was torn down September 1959. This photograph is found on page 177 of "Time Was.." 2nd Ed. by A. F. Weaver. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20482/
[The Hexagon Hotel]
The Hexagon Hotel at 701 N. Oak Avenue, opened in December 1897. The brick building to the right was the Convention Hall (built in 1925 on the foundation of the Hotel's electric plant) for the West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention. The Hexagon Hotel was demolished in 1959, the Convention Center in 1977. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20358/
[The Hexagon Hotel]
A large group of people, most sitting on donkeys, are shown out front of the Hexagon Hotel. Donkeys were used to transport visitors to the top of East Mountain for an overview of the City of Mineral Wells. It appears the party in this picture is preparing for such a trip. The Caldwell family ran the Hexagon Hotel as a boarding house for a while, hence the sign on the second floor of the building. H. L. Milling and his father also ran the hotel for a while, too. The building visible behind the hotel is the DC generating plant that supplied electricity to illuminate the building. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20352/
[The Hexagon Hotel]
The Hexagon Hotel was built in 1895 by David G. Galbraith, the inventor of the paper clip, and co-developer of acetate synthetic fiber. According to Ellen Puerzer ("The Octagon House Inventory", Eight-Square Publishing, copyright 2011), the building was twelve-sided, clad with clapboard, built on a stone foundation. Two English stonemasons did all stonework, presumably also the work on the DC generating plant next to the hotel. The rooms within were hexagon-shaped, with a bath being shared between every two rooms. The well-ventilated "honeycomb" structure (a master-stroke in the days before air-conditioning)opened in December 1897. The stone building behind and left of the Hotel is the plant for generating electricity used for light and fans (for a fee) in every room in the hotel. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20365/
[The Hexagon Hotel Staircase]
The Hexagon Hotel had four staircases that spiraled down through its five floors. The interior trim was of "heart of pine"--a hardwood, despite its name. Pegs and square nails were used in the construction. The building was designed in a honeycomb pattern to maximize ventilation for the comfort of the guests. See also: Hexagon Hotel [with history] for further details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20477/
[The Hexagon Hotel Stairwell]
This picture shows the staircase in the Hexagon Hotel taken from the top floor. A view of the first-floor lobby can be seen at the lower middle of the picture with the stairs spiraling from floor to floor down to it. A writer in the Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.) in 1966 remarked that "[A]s one entered the lobby once could see the stairways as they encircled each floor giving a gallery effect." See also: "Hexagon Hotel [with history]" for further details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20476/
[A High School Coronation, 1947]
The High School Coronation of 1947 had its picture taken in the Convention Hall. The photograph was taken by Du-Caan Studios, Mineral Wells, Texas. The people involved--with two possible exceptions--are not known. [written on the back in pencil: Barbara Bowman Barbara Weaver] texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39232/
[A Hill With Power Poles]
This picture was taken from one of 17 (4"X4") negatives that were contained in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma, 73069), addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography and postmarked "Aug. 4, 1975." Also on the envelope are some telephone numbers and a remark: "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield.) This picture is taken from East Mountain, Mineral Wells, looking east along NE 4th Street. The ruins of a foundation of a building seen at the end of the street about half-way up the hill was the Chautauqua, completed in 1905 and demolished about 1912. The lookout tower at the top of the mountain was blown away by a tornado in 1930. There is a sign below the crest of the mountain (It appears to proclaim the "Young Photo Garden", which was located at 309 N. Oak Avenue)approximately in the place where the "Welcome" sign was erected in 1922. The Jaycees (Junior Chamber of Commerce) built a youth center on this site in the 1970's, that is still standing at the present time [2008]. Several unidentified people are also to be seen in the photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20375/
[A Home at 401 N. W. 6th Street]
This photograph is found on page 115 of the "Mini Edition, 'Time Was'..." and on page 140 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. J. S. Murphy (seen on the left) built this home in 1914 for L. E. Seaman (on the right). The style appears to be eclectic, with Prairie and Mission elements. Please note the unusual double porte-cochere and the shaped parapet of the front dormer. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20262/
[The Home of Dr. C.F. Yeager at 300 NE 1st Street]
A note on the back of the print states that this home was located at 300 NE 1st Street. This home, of physician Dr. C.F. Yeager, stood next door and east of the Old Methodist Church, which may be seen on the left side of the photograph. Dr. Yeager's drugstore was one block west of his home at the SW corner of of NW 1st Street and NW 2nd Avenue. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20263/
[A Horse-Drawn Fire Wagon]
Mineral Wells had an early horse-drawn fire wagon, pulled by two white horses (named Joe and Frank) and driven by a man named Cogdell. This picture is included on page 189 of the Second Edition of "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells...", by A. F. Weaver. The city's first fire station was located at 202 N. Oak Avenue, but the horses had difficulty responding to emergency calls from this fire station because the fire wagon's wheels tended to get trapped in the street car tracks that ran down the center of Oak Avenue, which was not paved at that time. This fire was in the central business district (note the roofs of two multistory buildings, visible at the upper left edge of the picture.) Fire hoses laid along the street are being used by two men in the left middle background to furnish water to fight the fire. The location of this particular fire is not specified, but is probably the Delaware Hotel (formerly the St. Nicholas.) Mineral Wells has experienced several disastrous fires in the past; one in 1914, two blocks west of the Delaware' location, destroyed six city blocks. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38080/
[A House at 401 NW 4th Avenue]
A home at 401 NW 4th Avenue taken June 1974 is illustrated here. The house was built by P.E. Bock, in what appears to be Colonial Revival style. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16159/
[A House at 401 NW 4th Avenue]
This picture gives a better view of the house shown in the succeeding photograph. It was taken in June of 1974. The house was built by P.E. Bock. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16158/
[A House at 1004 SW 10th Street]
A picture of the home at 1004 SW 10th Street, Mineral Wells, Texas is shown here. The picture does not afford a sufficiently good view to determine its style, but Neoclassical elements are evident. A 1940 telephone book lists it as the address of one Alvin Maddox. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16164/
[A House at 1004 SW 10th Street]
This photograph affords a wider view of the house shown in the previous picture. It is of eclectic style, with Prairie, and Neoclassical elements. A telephone book dated 1940 lists it as the address of Alvin Maddox. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16163/
Howard's Hardware Store 1903
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60940/
[In Front of the Schoolhouse, ca. 1885]
The back of this photograph shows three notes: 1: "Taken in front of school house about 1885." (This photograph appears to be of the students and teachers of Mineral Wells' first public school, the "Little Rock Schoolhouse," built in 1884.) 2: "Donated by James H. Perry", and 3: "Some are dead. Some are married, and we are all scattered, never to meet on earth again." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25072/
Inside a Howard Department Store
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60917/
[Inside of the Crazy Water Bottling Plant]
Handwriting on the back of this photograph identifies it as "Crazy Fiz 1930s" It is a section of the Crazy Water Bottling Plant, where carbon dioxide appears to have been added to the mineral water in order to compete with the popular soft drinks of the era. Note the bottling machine in the right foreground of the picture. Women are packing the carbonated "fizz water" for shipment. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29448/
[Inside the Electric & Ice Plant]
A "Major" J[ohn] D[avis] Beardsley (who had fought for Maine in the Civil War) had been granted a 99-year franchise by the City of Mineral Wells for the generation and sale of electricity. Major Beardsley is also credited (By the Abilene "Daily Reporter of 1905) of being the moving authority behind a railroad that was planned to run from Abilene to the Texas Central Line. The panic of 1907 brought ruination to Mr. Beardsley's enterprise; and in 1910, a syndicate bought out Beardsley's plant and Galbraith's DC plant as well. The Mineral Wells Electric Company was organized in 1913. In 1925, the Texas Power and Light Company bought the Mineral Wells Electric Company. It continued to operate under the original Beardsley franchise. The old Electric and Ice Plant was once located on SW 1st Avenue. This photograph was taken around 1908. Pictured is D. L. Austin, father of Myrtle Butler. It is featured in "Time Once Was in Mineral Wells" on page 83, in reversed form. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39174/
[Inspiration Point?]
There is some controversy concerning the location shown in this photograph. Two notes on back of the picture read "So. of city on 281", and "Lake M W." (Lake Mineral Wells is east of the city.) This picture appears to be taken just east of Inspiration point, instead, and looking southwest, where the highway starts down the mountain. The area was a popular picnic spot from the 1930's to the 1950's. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20343/
[Inspiration Point]
The view from Inspiration Point, overlooking the Brazos River seven miles south of Mineral Wells. Billy Sunday, a popular evangelical preacher in America, visited Mineral Wells in 1900. He exclaimed "This is an inspiration!" when he saw the beautiful scenery south of the town. He unwittingly gave the Point its name. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16349/
[The Interior of a Barbershop]
This photograph shows of the early-day barber shops in Mineral Wells. The persons shown and the location of it are unknown. Please observe the point on the bottom of the best-illustrated light bulb. The room was located, it appears, in a re-modeled building whose place has not been determined. A legend on the photograph dates it to 1905; however, calendars in the picture show April. April 1st fell on a Sunday in 1906. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39188/
[The Interior of a Grocery Store]
A legend on the back of the photograph reads: "D.M. Howard Grocery Simon Gilbert on Left Great Uncle of Estes Gilbert" A different hand has written "2nd is D. M. Howard himself" Please notice the moustaches on nearly all the gentlemen pictured. Please notice also that all of the men but two are wearing jackets. The store shows no sign of electric lighting. There may be a gas fixture at the left edge of the picture, which, along with the appearance of the men, may serve to indicate that the photograph was taken in the early part of the twentieth century, but definite information on this issue is lacking. The picture is featured in "Time Once was in Mineral Wells" on page 123. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39172/
[The Interior of The First National Bank]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60923/
[The J.S. Murphy Home]
The J.S. Murphy home, located on East Mountain (facing West), overlooks the city. The house was built by Murphy in 1905, and remodeled into a full two-story home in 1915. Mr Murphy was a partner of Goodrum, Murphy and Croft, Contractors, who built many of the homes and buildings of Mineral Wells, including the Old High School. The picture appears on pages 114 and 140 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells...", 2004, Mini Edition. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20367/
[J. W. (Doon) Deberry and His Well machine]
Drilling of the Vichy Well was done by J.W. "Doon" Deberry in the 600 block of North Oak Street. The Vichy Well Natatorium, later the Beach, and still later the Standard Well, was located across N. Oak Avenue from the Hexagon House Hotel, which can be seen at the right edge of the photograph. The wooden building on the left, with the false arcades, has not yet been identified. The Standard Pavilion boasted a variety of attractions including a swimming pool, movie theater, bowling alley, and dance floor. It was torn down during World War II, and replaced by a USO Canteen to serve the soldiers training at local Camp Wolters. At the end of the War, the USO was given to the City and utilized as a Community Center and later Senior Center. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25087/
Jack Amlung
The band in this photograph is identified as "Jack Amlung." It consists of nine players, including its leader. The instruments visible are: A sousaphone; two (?)pianos; a violin; an alto saxophone; a clarinet, a guitar, a bass viol; percussion. Further information about this band is, sadly, lacking. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39164/
[Jarmon Alvis Lynch and wife]
A photograph of Jarmon Alvis Lynch and his wife, taken October 1, 1977. He was the grandson J. A. Lynch, the founder of Mineral Wells. He is shown standing on the steps of the Rock School House (in Mineral Wells)in this 1977 photograph, and holding his drawing of the Lynch cabins, which also shows the drilling rig his grandfather used to dig the first mineral well. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16139/