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[John Mathiews Inspects a Well]
John Mathiews, owner of the Crazy Hotel, inspects the first known Crazy Water well under the sidewalk of the northwest corner of the present [2012] Crazy Hotel. The photograph was taken in 1974.It is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 29. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39157/
[A Joint Meeting of Kiwanis and Rotary Clubs]
This photograph is found in A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells...", first edition, on page 101. The caption reads, "Inside the Damron Hotel at a joint meeting of Kiwanis and Rotary Clubs. Dr. McCracken is third from the right." Dr. Joseph Hill McCracken was President of the Texas Medical Association in 1911. The Damron Hotel, in the 100 block between W. Hubbard and SW 1st Street, burned in 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25061/
[Judge J. A. Lynch]
. This picture,of Judge J. A. Lynch (1827-1920), founder of Mineral Wells, Texas, may be found published on page 32 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. It is taken from a painting that is owned by the Lynch family, and executed by Thomas Beauregard. A label at the bottom of the frame cannot be read, but presumably identifies the subject of the painting. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20259/
[Judy Garland in Mineral Wells]
This picture, found on page 161 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver, identifies the man selling a money order to Judy Garland in the Old Post Office (on NE 2nd Street) as D. C. Harris. The man on the right is identified as W. A. Ross. It has since [2102] been determined that the reason for Miss Garland's presence in the post Office was to lead a procession of children there in order to purchase Defense Stamps. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20255/
A July Crowd
This photograph,labeled "A July Crowd", shows a ladies' gathering about 1920. The photograph shows what is possibly a tea party or a ladies' club meeting. Some of the ladies shown were members of prominent Mineral Wells families. Identified in a typed note - and graph - accompanying the photograph are: (starting at back left) the 4th lady is Mrs. D. G. Galbraith [wife of the owner of the Hexagon House], the 8th is Mrs. E. F. Yeager [wife of Dr. E.F. Yeager, Pharmacist/ Owner of the Lion Drug Store), 16th is Mrs. J.H. McCracken [wife Dr. J.H. McCracken, president of the Texas Medical Association], 17th may be Mrs. Raines (Mrs. McCracken's mother); (middle row, starting in front of Mrs. Yeager) the second from left is Mrs. Dr. Beeler; (first row from left) the 3rd lady may be Mrs. Coon, the 6th lady is Mrs. Paul Bock, the 8th is Mrs. Reba Williams. The children in front are Langdon Bock on the left and Elizabeth Galbraith on the right. There were forty people in total. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20253/
[The Kidwell Heights Elementary School]
Kidwell Heights School was built in 1910 at 1508 SE 6th Avenue as an elementary school for grades one to four. It was used for various purposes after being closed as an elementary school--including the administrative offices for Mineral Wells' fledgling Silk Industry before and during the early part of World War II (when the supply of silk for parachute material was embargoed). The development of nylon as a substitute, however, was accelerated. The cheaper and more versatile artificial material doomed the native silk industry, and the offices were closed in 1942. Kidwell Heights was used as a Junior High School for about three years, 1951 to 1954, after which time, the Junior High moved to the (then) new Mineral Wells third High School building at 900 SW 5th Avenue. The inset in the picture is the south entrance of Mineral Wells' second High School at 101 NW 5th Avenue. The building currently [2010] houses the Knights of the Pythias Hall. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25047/
[A Ladies' Athletic Team]
Nine ladies in uniform (?), with kerchiefs on their heads, are shown seated on a rug in front of what is presumed to be a painted background. The basketball in front of the center-most lady is marked "'14". They are, perhaps a ladies' basketball team. Further information concerning them is lacking. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39253/
[The Ladies Civic League Fountain]
The Ladies Civic League Fountain, shown in this photograph, is now [2009]located in the "Towne Common" (behind the Mineral Wells Office Supply), surrounded by "Memorial Bricks." It was originally located at the corner of SE 2nd Street and SE 1st Avenue as a watering trough for horses. It was moved in 1911 to the back part of the Gibson Well Park in the 700 block NW 2nd Avenue. (It may have been moved to facilitate the flow of the expected traffic around "the old Post Office", construction of which started in May the following year, 1912.) The fountain was relocated in October of 1972 (the time of the photograph) to West City Park on W. Hubbard Street (Highway 180W), and placed at its present location in 2007. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20449/
[Ladies Hold Flowers]
This photograph presents a mystery. Ten ladies, dressed in 1920's-style fashion, stand on the steps of the Baker Hotel, holding bouquets of chrysanthemums; one lady has roses; a basket of flowers with a tulle ribbon stands in foreground. The occasion for this display is entirely unknown. A legend on back reads: "For Q from L Mrs Joe Young." The identities of the people mentioned are entirely unknown. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39246/
[Ladies with parasols]
"Sllew La Renim" (a social club) was "Mineral Wells" spelled backwards. Its members pose in front of the Old Post Office in 1913. Identified in the photograph are: Anna Mae Guinn, Ernestine Pollard, May Belle Smith, Ann Locke Galbraith, Ruby Andrews, Mattie Withers. Note the Mineral Wells Sanitarium in the left background. This photograph may be found on page 118 of "TIME WAS...", First Edition by A.F. Weaver. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16273/
[A Lady Viewing Mineral Wells From East Mountain]
A lady is shown viewing city of Mineral Wells while standing on a rock formation. She is on East Mountain, looking southwest. A popular activity for tourists was to climb the mountain and view the city. The picture appears to have been taken about 1920. This picture is one of 17 (4"X4") negatives that were found in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma, 73069), addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography, and postmarked "Aug. 4, 1975." Also on the envelope, some telephone numbers and "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield)." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20385/
[Lake Mineral Wells]
This photograph shows the Civic League Island at Lake Mineral Wells, four miles east of Mineral Wells, Texas, with a rustic bridge connecting the two small islands, picnic tables, and grilles. In the foreground, there are two small boats with canopies, carrying passengers on the water of the lake. A forested shoreline is visible in the background of the image. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39230/
[Lake Mineral Wells]
Rock Creek in Parker County was dammed up in 1919 to form Lake Mineral Wells, the third lake built as a water-supply for the popular resort town. This photograph appears to be on the east side of the lake where boat docks were located. The lake has been a popular recreation area from the beginning, and is now part of Mineral Wells State Park. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25092/
[Lake Mineral Wells]
This is a view from a spot near the dam looking across the lake to Ed Dismuke's Famous Water Company, where mineral water was piped to his drinking pavilion on NW 3rd Street. It was here also, that the Famous crystallizing plant, where "Pronto Lax" crystals were made, was located. Lake Pinto supplied water to the City of Mineral Wells from the time of its creation in 1902, until Rock Creek was dammed to form Lake Mineral Wells in Parker County in 1918, and completed in September of 1920. This photograph is taken from one of 17 (4X4) negatives in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds, addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography, and postmarked "Aug. 4, 1975." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20380/
[Lake Mineral Wells, 1 of 4, Flood Stage]
Lake Mineral Wells, Mineral Wells State Park, is shown here in flood stage. Heavy spring rains dumped 7.2 inches of rainfall into the area over a violent week-end in March 1976, resulting in a flood that claimed 24 lives in fire- and water-related incidents. The dam is visible on the far left side of the picture, with water flowing over it. Flood waters cover a large part of the land between the photographer and the dam. The public boat ramp and fueling station are on the peninsula at the far right side of the picture. The picture is part of a group of films labeled "1977", but related news articles give the date as March of the previous year. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29919/
[Lake Mineral Wells, 2 of 4,]
The dam of Lake Mineral Wells is shown here during a flood, March 1976. A large area of Palo Pinto and Parker counties received heavy rains (up to 7.2 inches in places) during a three-day period. The road directly below the dam was entirely under water, and the effect of water flowing over the road is barely visible. Heavy damage was also reported over a substantial part of the City of Mineral Wells as a result of the downpour. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29918/
[Lake Mineral Wells, 4 of 4: Spillway]
Shown here is the lower end of the spillway from Lake Mineral Wells after the flood in March 1976. The dam is barely visible at the upper end of the spillway in the middle of the picture. The road directly below the dam is under water, and is not visible in any other pictures of this flood. It suffered such severe damage that it had to be rebuilt. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29916/
Laying the Cornerstone of the Post Office
Shown here is the laying the cornerstone of the Post Office at 201 NE 2nd Street on May 13, 1912. The Chautauqua is at the upper left corner of the picture, and the Cliff House Hotel is visible in the upper middle of the picture. Buildings on the right side of the picture were situated on the east side of Mesquite Street (now NE 1st Avenue). Buildings on the far right of the picture were once located where the Baker Hotel now [2008] stands. Early automobiles and horse-drawn carriages also appear in the picture. The photographer appears to have been standing on the north side of NE 2nd Street, looking east. A holograph inscription above and below the picture cannot be read. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20419/
[The Lazine Home]
This picture illustrates the John and Gracie Lazine home, located at the corner of S. Oak Avenue and SW 7th Street. The Lazines had three boys, Oscar, O.D., and Olen, and two girls, Evelyn and Dora. The Lazines were quite prominent in the community. This photograph appears on page 183 of A.F. Weaver's "Time Was...", Second Edition. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20290/
[The Lion's Club Womanless Wedding]
The Lion's Club presented an annual comedy skit known as a "Womanless Wedding." This one took place about 1940, and appears on page 119 of "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells," First edition, 1974, by A. F. Weaver. He identifies the men as, "Standing in back: G. Ritchie, Weaver, B. Joiner, B. Holmes, ?, N. Glenn, J. McGaha. Middle row: F. Brewer, ?, H. Cohen, ?. Front row seated: G. Johnson, ?, L. Gambrell, ?, C. Lodal, N. Carlock, ?, M. Mullins." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20254/
[Lovers Retreat]
Lovers' Retreat has been called one of the most scenic spots in Texas. This popular picnic spot, located on Eagle Creek north of US Highway 180 (four miles west of Palo Pinto, and south of the creek) was used for many years for camp meetings, and the annual Palo Pinto Old Settlers Reunion. This photograph shows some of the huge boulders in the area north of Eagle Creek, which were accessible from the picnic area by a suspension foot-bridge that spanned a popular swimming and fishing hole. This spectacular recreation area is currently [2007] on private property, and no longer accessible to the public. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25096/
[Lynch Plaza, 2 of 3, Different View]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29859/
[Lynch Plaza 3 of 3]
Lynch Plaza, in the center of this picture, is located on the corner of North Oak and East Hubbard Streets. This structure, originally called the Firstron Building, replaced the First National Bank at this location. The bank was located in the northwest corner of the Oxford Hotel. The hotel building, including the bank, was destroyed by fire in 1983. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29857/
D. M. Howard Millinery Department
The D. M. Howard Department Store was once located at 101 SW 1st Street. This photograph illustrates its millinery department. The portly gentleman on the far left has been identified as D. M. Howard himself. The identities of the five ladies, the girl, and the remaining gentleman have not been discovered. If one may judge by the clothes of the people shown in the picture, it is conjectured that the photograph was taken within the first two decades of the twentieth century. Five Howard brothers came from North Carolina to settle in Palo Pinto County. D. M. was the first one to come He later sent for his other brothers. The first Howard buildings were at the northeast corner of Oak & Hubbard Streets, facing Hubbard. This picture is featured in "Time Once Was" on page 123. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39186/
[A Man, A Woman and a Portrait]
Ruby Shattles (Mrs. Jesse Shattles) presents a portrait of Achilles Corcanges to Mr. Corcanges, founder & owner of radio station KORC in Mineral Wells. Mrs. Shattles owned and operated Pavilion Studios at 412 North Oak. This picture may be found in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 185. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39180/
[A Man and a Woman on Donkeys]
Shown here is a rocky, bosky hillside. A man and a woman are both on donkeys; he leans over with a hand on her donkey; five photographer, under veils, catch the scene with cameras. Note that the photographers all wear vests. The clothing of the woman suggests early 20th century. No more is known about this picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39242/
[A Man With a plow]
A note on back of photograph states that it shows preparation for paving the brick highway from Mineral Wells to Millsap. The note contains the name D. M. Shrum, but does not indicate that it is the person in the photograph. The brick highway to Millsap was part of the nation's first transcontinental highway, the Bankhead highway, from mile zero in Washington, D.C. to San Diego in California. It was built through Mineral Wells in about 1921. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20459/
[A Marina on Possum Kingdom Lake]
Shown here is a view of Possum Kingdom Lake, at possibly Harmar Harbor, showing one of its many marinas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38093/
[A Mayor Being Pushed in a Wheelbarrow]
The visiting Mineral Wells High School football team had just defeated the Weatherford Kangaroos 21 to 6 in their annual football rivalry some time around 1940. The exact date of the event remains unknown as of 2013. Mayor George Barber of Mineral Wells, is enjoying a victor's ride, supplied by the Mayor of Weatherford, across the football field at Weatherford Stadium. The wheelbarrow, used in payment of the wager between rival mayors, is decorated for this purpose. Such whimsical wagering (and the high jinks that accompany the pay-off) is common in Texas High School football. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25080/
[A Mayor's Granddaughter on a Donkey]
A copy of this photograph may be found in A. F. Weaver's, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", First Edition, on page 151. The caption reads, "Mary Berta Perry, granddaughter of Mayor Laverty, 1908." Jim Laverty was the first City Marshall of Mineral Wells. He was elected mayor when the City was first incorporated in 1882. The first incorporation was defeated by vote in 1894, and Mineral Wells was reincorporated with G.C. Green as the first elected mayor. This picture was the style of souvenir photograph which local photographer J. C. McClure, first owner of the donkeys, took on an East Mountain path frequented by visitors. Mr. McClure was killed while riding a wild stallion on Oak Avenue. J. L. Young and his wife later owned the photography studio and the donkeys. They later built a log cabin as a scenic backdrop at a photograph stop where the donkey trail crossed a footpath up West Mountain. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24996/
[Men and a Woman Around a Microphone]
Five men and a lady are pictured congregating around a microphone. The numbers "5195" are seen obscurely on it. An alert-looking boy in the background holds a musical instrument, as does one of the men. A man in striped pants talks into the microphone. The occasion is entirely unknown. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39248/
[Men on a Trail]
This picture is taken from one of 17 negatives that were found in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma, 73069), postmarked "Aug 4, 1975", and addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography. Also on the envelope were some telephone numbers, and the remark "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield.) The picture appears to have been taken atop "Welcome" Mountain (East Mountain) in Mineral wells. The structure at the top of the Mountain could be an observation tower that is known to have been erected at this location. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20378/
[Men With Bricks]
Thirty-one men in shirtsleeves, some with straw hats, some in fedoras, all in white shirts, most with ties, each proudly hold up a three-holed brick in front of an undistinguished-looking building that is flanked by a live-oak tree. A van with an obscure legend (perhaps a laundry)stands behind them. The occasion that prompted this photograph remains obscure. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39244/
[The Middle Panel of the Oldest Known Panorama of Mineral Wells]
Shown here is the middle photograph of three that are arranged on pages 40 and 41 of A. F. Weaver's book, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", to create the "Earliest known panoramic view of Mineral Wells around 1882." It was taken from East Mountain looking to the southwest. The photograph includes the center of today's [2008]downtown Mineral Wells. A large white two-story building is shown at the left center of the picture on West Hubbard Street, at the site of the (later) Southern Hotel. The building at the far left edge of the picture occupies on the site of the current Mineral Wells Fire and Police Departments in the 200 block of South Oak Avenue. The center of Mineral Wells' Business District is now [2008] the intersection of Oak Avenue (US 281) and Hubbard Street (US Highway 180). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38089/
[The Milling Sanatorium]
Dr. H. H. Milling was the first of Mineral Wells' "rubbin' doctors." He operated the Mineral Wells Sanatorium at 315 NW 1st Avenue before building this sanitarium in the 2500 block of SE 6th Avenue - the old Millsap Highway) about 1929. The building was later sold and renamed Irvine Sanitarium. It now [2010] belongs to the Veterans of Foreign Wars, is located at 1400 SE VFW Highway (a branch of SE 6th Avenue), and houses VFW Post 2399. Dr. Milling also owned 60 acres on Pollard Creek in north Mineral Wells that were donated to the state of Texas to use as a State Park, which became SP8. During the Great Depression of the 1930's, the WPA and the CCC made several additions to that park to improve its recreational value: Bridges, a small dam, steps up the mountain, restrooms, etc., all using native sandstone. When Milling Park was determined by the state to be surplus property, it was deeded to the city and later renamed North City Park. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24950/
[Milling's Sanitarium and Water Well ]
The gazebo-like structure shown in the picture protects a water pump in front of the Milling Sanitarium. The sanitarium was built about 1929 on what was then the 2500 block of SE Sixth Avenue. It later became the Irvine Sanitarium. The Veterans of Foreign Wars (Post 2399) occupies the building as of 2010. The fate of the structure shown here is unknown. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60948/
[The Mineral Wells Annual Fair]
Typewritten on the back of the photograph (probably by A.F. Weaver)is: "We attended the Mineral Wells annual fair at the Dance Pavilion at Elmhurst Park." The photograph is probably a copy of an earlier image. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20395/
[The Mineral Wells Fire Department in 1975 ]
Shown in the top row are: Rene James, Weldon Hood, Jerry Kidwell, Walter Carter, Jerry Loftis. In the middle row: Eddie Bell, Eldred Fryer, Horace Roe, Bud Smith, Joe Knight, Kenneth Kinder. In the front row: B.H. Gilstrap, Eddie Fryer, Melton Brewton (Chief), Jerry Van Natta, Allen Fryer, Rickey Epperson, Larry Clutts, Louis Clutts, Butch Clutts, Gene Knerr, Davis Light, John Gilbert, Byron Kizziah, Bazil Wright, R.S. Purcell, W.G. Mullins, Sam Smith, Arthur Schulte, Cecil Holifield. Information for these names was taken from the back of photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29828/
[Mineral Wells' First Police Department]
Mineral Wells' first Police Department is shown on horseback here. On the far left is Jim Barrett, Chief, and in the middle is Paul Granbury. The man on the right remains unknown. This photograph comes from A. F. Weaver's, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", page 153. The picture appears to have been taken at the photographer's souvenir picture stand on the donkey trail about halfway up East Mountain. J. C. McClure, an early photographer, first owned the donkeys for the trail; but he was killed while riding a wild stallion on Oak Avenue. J. L. Young and his wife took over the photographer's stand. They built a rock house, here as a background, for souvenir pictures. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25000/
[Mineral Wells' First Public School]
Mineral Wells' first public school was erected in 1884, and located on what is now [2008] NW 5th Avenue. The building is now used as a museum. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20281/
[The Mineral Wells Golf Country Club and Lake]
Please note the men in golf attire standing on bank, one of whom is holding a bag of golf clubs. Knee-length knickers with decorated socks were typical golf wear in the Roaring Twenties. Others are lounging around on the bank between club house and lake on a typical lazy Sunday afternoon. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16269/
[Mineral Wells Heritage Association, 1975]
This picture immortalizes the signing of the 25-year lease at $25 per year of the 1884 Little Rock School building for the purpose of establishing it as a museum. Pictured, left to right are: A. F. Weaver, President of the Mineral Wells Heritage Association; L. Gordon Nelson, Vice President; Mrs. Gordon Nelson, Chairperson for the Restoration Committee. Seated is Bill Hall, Superintendent of Mineral Wells Schools. The photograph was taken in July, 1975. The Little Rock School, in 2007, remains a museum dedicated to the preservation of the History of Mineral Wells. This picture appears in "Time Was in Mineral Wells...." on page 173. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20247/
[Mineral Wells High School]
This view of Mineral Wells High School, taken from the east in 1940, shows the 1884 "Little Rock School House" (Mineral Wells' first public school) on the north side of the high school. The larger school was built at 101 NW 5th Avenue in 1915. The second high school in Mineral Wells, it still [2008] stands. Three other high schools have been built since the last class graduated from this one in 1955. It is now the property of The Fifty Year Club of Mineral Wells, and it is being restored. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25051/
[Mineral Wells High School]
This photograph was taken at the completion of Mineral Wells High School in 1915. The Mineral Wells Independent School District donated the building to the Fifty Year Club in 2007. The Fifty Year Club intends to restore the school. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20238/
[The Mineral Wells High School Band in the Bicentennial Parade]
The Mineral Wells High School Band in the "Time Was" Bicentennial Parade of 1976 (celebrating the United States Bicentennial) is shown here, as taken from a perspective looking northeast at intersection of N. Oak Avenue (Highway 281 left to right) and E. Hubbard Street (Highway 180, one-way right to left.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16148/
[The Mineral Wells High School Marching Band]
The Mineral Wells High School marching band is shown here performing on a football field in the late 1930's. The band director at that time was Mr. Dave Brunswick. See also "Mineral Wells High School Concert Band." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16347/
[Mineral Wells High School's First Graduating Class, 1903]
Shown in this picture are, from left to right: Maggie McDaniel, Annabel Cushman, Myra Hunt Oliver and (Valedictorian) Ferdinand "Doc" Howard. The title of his valedictory address was "The Electrical Age." The diplomas were presented by Judge F.C. Highsmith. This photograph is to be found in the second edition of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver on page 189. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20472/
[Mineral Wells' Municipal Airport]
An aerial View of Mineral Wells Municipal Airport and Downing Heliport is shown here. Further information about them is not yet available. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39203/
[The Mineral Wells Police Force and City/County Ambulance Service]
Shown here is a picture of the Mineral Wells Police force and the City/County Ambulance Service, taken in 1974. From left to right are: Bennie Hutcheson, R.A. Hodges, Jim Elmore, Jimmy Davis, Walter Graves, Orville West, Montiford Parker, Henry Childress, Don Farriel, Larry Brandenburg, Bill Meaders, Raymond Jones, Mike Poe, Ricky Shank, Fred Foreman (Police Chief), Gene Knerr, Gilbert Sommerfield (Investigator), David Jared, and Ronnie Edwards. The information was taken from the back of photograph, which itself was taken at the West City Park. It is published on page 153 of A.F.Weaver's book, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29831/
[Mineral Wells Policemen]
On back of this photograph is written: "T. Row. L to R. Harry Shuffler, Gilbert Summerfield, L.D. Hill, Bill Patton & Odie Heath 1953 B. Row L. to R. Chief Frank Granbury, B Lain (probably "Blain") Price, John Fletcher, E. Scott Tobey & Alfred A Perkins" The picture was donated to the Mineral Wells Heritage Association on February 12, 1988, by Scott Tobey. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29827/