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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 Decade: 1970-1979
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 10 of 21]
Another in the extensive series of photographs that covered the spectacular holiday fire that completely consumed the Damron Hotel during the 1975 holiday season. This picture shows some of the early response to the fire. Note, for example, the electrical utility truck, which has arrived to cut off electrical power to the buildings. The Damron Hotel (which was built during the days when Mineral Wells was a resort) was originally named the Colonial Hotel. It was built in 1906 by rancher J. T. Holt for his second wife. The name was changed in 1917 when Mr. Holt traded the hotel to Agnew and Bessie Damron for a ranch. It was located at 109 W. Hubbard. The spectacular fire received extensive photographic coverage. The sign "Pemberton Appliance and Plumbing", located across the street west, is visible. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29895/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 11 of 21: Fighting the Fire on W. Hubbard St.]
Shown here is another picture in the series of photographs of the fire that destroyed the Damron Hotel during the holiday season of 1975. This smoke-shrouded scene of W. Hubbard, shows the front entrance to the hotel in the earlier stages of the fire's progress. The Damron was built in 1906, during the days that Mineral Wells was a popular resort spa. It burned completely on December 22,1975. The hotel was located at 109 W. Hubbard Street, between Hubbard and S.W. 1st Streets, and was originally built as The Colonial Hotel by rancher J. T. Holt for his second wife, who would not live in the country. The hotel's name was changed in 1917 when Mr. Holt traded it to Agnew and Bessie Damron for a ranch. It was a very popular hotel through the Roaring Twenties, the Great Depression and World War II. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29894/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 12 of 21: Numerous Fire Hoses Lying in Front of the Hotel]
Another view of the front entrance to the Damron Hotel at 109 W. Hubbard during the earlier stages of the fire that completely destroyed it on December 22, 1975. The hotel was originally built in 1906 during Mineral Wells' heyday as a popular resort spa. It was built by rancher J. T. Holt for his second wife, who would not live in the country. Originally named The Colonial Hotel, the name was changed 1n 1917 when Mr. Holt traded it to Agnew and Bessie Damron for a ranch. The spectacular Holiday fire that destroyed the hotel received extensive photographic coverage. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29893/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 15 of 21: Passenger Cars on a Back Street]
The Damron Hotel, built in 1906 during the days that Mineral Wells was a popular resort spa, burned completely on December 22, 1975. It was located at 109 W. Hubbard Street. This picture shows the dense cloud of smoke that resulted from the holiday catastrophe. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29890/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 16 of 21: Black Smoke Billowing Over Businesses]
Shown here is another view of the huge column of black smoke accompanying the Damron Hotel fire that completely destroyed the hotel on December 22, 1975. The hotel was built in 1906 as the Colonial Hotel by rancher J. T. Holt for his second wife, who would not live in the country. The popular hotel was traded to Agnew and Bessie Damron in 1917 for a ranch, and its name was changed to reflect the new ownership. It was located at 109 W. Hubbard Street, and the spectacular fire that destroyed it received extensive photographic coverage. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29889/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 17 of 21: Two Individuals on the Street Northwest of the Fire]
Shown here is another view of the plume of thick black smoke at the height of the fire that completely destroyed the Damron Hotel December 22, 1975, along with two hard-hatted individuals (presumably fire-fighters) standing in the street. The hotel was originally built as the Colonial Hotel in 1906 by J. T. Holt for his second wife, because the second Mrs. Holt would not live in the country. Mr. Holt traded the hotel to Agnew and Bessie Damron for a ranch in 1917, and the hotel's name was changed to reflect the new ownership. It was a very popular hotel during the mineral water industry's heyday through the Roaring Twenties, Great Depression and World War II. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29888/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 18 of 21: Individual in Front of the Burning Hotel]
The Damron Hotel, built as the Colonial Hotel in 1906 during the days that Mineral Wells was a popular resort, burned completely on December 22, 1975. It was built by Mr. J. T. Holt for his second wife who would not live in the country. It was traded to Agnew and Bessie Damron for a ranch about 1917 and the name was changed to reflect the new ownership. Shown here is another view of the front entrance to the hotel as flames burst through the front wall of the building. The gesturing individual with the hard hat has not been identified. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29887/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 19 of 21, Two People Looking South from North]
The Damron Hotel was built as the Colonial Hotel in 1906 during the heyday of Mineral Wells as a popular resort city. Mr. J. T. Holt built it for his second wife, who would not live in the country. It was traded in 1917 for a ranch to Agnew and Bessie Damron, and the name was changed to reflect the new ownership. It burned completely on December 22, 1975. This picture shows the front entrance under a dark plume of black smoke, with flames breaking through the upper floors of the front wall. Two people (one with a hard hat, and one without)stand observing the proceedings. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29886/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 20 of 21: Different View of the Fire]
Shown here is yet another view of fire at the Damron Hotel, December 22, 1975 is shown here. The hotel was located in the 109 W. Hubbard Street. The fire also destroyed Davidson Hardware, which was in the same building. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20302/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 21 of 21: An Early Stage, Looking East, Smoke Billowing]
Here is a view of the Damron Hotel (formerly located at 109 W. Hubbard Street)during the early stages of the fire (on December 22, 1975) that completely destroyed it. Built as the Colonial Hotel in 1906 by J. T. Holt for his second wife who would not live in the country, and traded to Agnew and Bessie Damron for a ranch about 1917, the name was changed to reflect the new ownership. It was a popular hotel during the heyday of Mineral Wells--through the Roaring Twenties, the Great Depression and World War II. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29885/
[The Demolition of the Convention Hall]
A holograph legend on the back of this picture states: "Tearing down Convention Hall 1976." The photograph illustrates the demolition of the building in full swing. Only the skeleton of the roof remains, and the walls are in ruins. This picture appears in Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells" on page 186. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39234/
[The Demolition of the Convention Hall--1 of 2: Front View]
The metal framework of the Mineral Wells Convention Hall is all that it readily visible during its demolition in 1975. Built on the rock foundation of the Hexagon House Electric Plant (for the West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention in 1925), it served as the site of numerous local functions including High School Graduation Exercises. The landmark Hexagon Hotel, Mineral Wells' first electrically-lighted hotel, stood on the vacant corner lot in the left foreground of this picture from 1897 to 1959. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29412/
[The Demolition of the Convention Hall, 2 of 2: From a Block Away]
This photograph was taken at an early stage of the demolition of the Mineral Wells Convention Hall on N. Oak Avenue. Built in 1925 to accommodate the West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention, it was constructed on the rock foundation of the Hexagon Hotel's electric power plant. The Hexagon Hotel, Mineral Wells' first electrically-lighted hotel, stood on the vacant corner lot in the foreground of this picture. It was torn down in 1959. When the Convention Hall was torn down in 1975, a member of the demolition crew said the new owner of the former London Bridge (to be re-erected at Havasu City in Arizona)was interested in acquiring the rocks to build the foundation for a fort to be constructed at the same site. (One local story credits that interest in the foundation stones as the reason for the demolition of the Convention Hall.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29413/
[The Fire at the Sangcura-Sprudel Well Building]
The Sangcura-Sprudel Well, located at 800 NW 2nd Avenue, was built around 1900. The building was later moved to 314 NW 5th Street, and the porches were enclosed. It was then re-modeled into a rooming house. The building burned down on December 5, 1973, five minutes before the annual Christmas Parade in Mineral Wells. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20338/
First National Bank
The first National Bank, at the SE corner of Oak Avenue and Hubbard Street in Mineral Wells, was originally located in the Oxford Hotel. The Lynch Building and Plaza were built on the site of the hotel, commemorating the location of the discovery of mineral water with "miracle healing powers" by a well drilled here by James A. Lynch in 1879, after the Oxford burned in 1983. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20423/
Fog
This booklet gives an overview of fog as it relates to aviation. According to the scope notes on the title page, it includes information about "Types of fog and factors for formation and dissipation; flight procedures when fog has been forecasted or encountered en route"; and the en-route weather aids available to the aviator." The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on the last page. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46571/
Frontal Weather
This booklet gives an overview of frontal weather as it relates to aviation. According to the scope notes on the title page, it includes a "Discussion of frontal weather systems to include identification, characteristics and flight techniques to be used when penetrating a given frontal system." The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on the last page. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46579/
[A House at 401 NW 4th Avenue]
A home at 401 NW 4th Avenue taken June 1974 is illustrated here. The house was built by P.E. Bock, in what appears to be Colonial Revival style. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16159/
[A House at 401 NW 4th Avenue]
This picture gives a better view of the house shown in the previous photograph. It was taken in June of 1974. The house was built by P.E. Bock. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16158/
[A House at 1004 SW 10th Street]
This photograph affords a wider view of the house shown in the previous picture. It is of eclectic style, with Prairie, and Neoclassical elements. A telephone book dated 1940 lists it as the address of Alvin Maddox. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16163/
Icing
This booklet gives an overview of icing as it relates to aviation. It includes information on "Three types of icing and associated cloud formations and temperatures" as well as "Hazards and flight procedures in icing", according to the scope notes on the title page. The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on the last page. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46570/
[Jarmon Alvis Lynch and wife]
A photograph of Jarmon Alvis Lynch and his wife, taken October 1, 1977. He was the grandson J. A. Lynch, the founder of Mineral Wells. He is shown standing on the steps of the Rock School House (in Mineral Wells)in this 1977 photograph, and holding his drawing of the Lynch cabins, which also shows the drilling rig his grandfather used to dig the first mineral well. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16139/
[Lake Mineral Wells, 2 of 4,]
The dam of Lake Mineral Wells is shown here during a flood, March 1976. A large area of Palo Pinto and Parker counties received heavy rains (up to 7.2 inches in places) during a three-day period. The road directly below the dam was entirely under water, and the effect of water flowing over the road is barely visible. Heavy damage was also reported over a substantial part of the City of Mineral Wells as a result of the downpour. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29918/
[Lake Mineral Wells, 3 of 4: Sign]
A sign in front of the spillway (which was part of the dam for Mineral Wells Lake before it was rebuilt to a higher level during World War Two) says, "Water For Texans." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29917/
[Lake Mineral Wells, 4 of 4: Spillway]
Shown here is the lower end of the spillway from Lake Mineral Wells after the flood in March 1976. The dam is barely visible at the upper end of the spillway in the middle of the picture. The road directly below the dam is under water, and is not visible in any other pictures of this flood. It suffered such severe damage that it had to be rebuilt. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29916/
[A Marina on Possum Kingdom Lake]
Shown here is a view of Possum Kingdom Lake, at possibly Harmar Harbor, showing one of its many marinas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38093/
Medical Facts for Pilots
This pamphlet gives an overview of information for pilots to maintain good health and recognize warning signs of problems they might face specific to flying. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46559/
[The Mineral Wells Fire Department in 1975 ]
Shown in the top row are: Rene James, Weldon Hood, Jerry Kidwell, Walter Carter, Jerry Loftis. In the middle row: Eddie Bell, Eldred Fryer, Horace Roe, Bud Smith, Joe Knight, Kenneth Kinder. In the front row: B.H. Gilstrap, Eddie Fryer, Melton Brewton (Chief), Jerry Van Natta, Allen Fryer, Rickey Epperson, Larry Clutts, Louis Clutts, Butch Clutts, Gene Knerr, Davis Light, John Gilbert, Byron Kizziah, Bazil Wright, R.S. Purcell, W.G. Mullins, Sam Smith, Arthur Schulte, Cecil Holifield. Information for these names was taken from the back of photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29828/
[Mineral Wells Heritage Association, 1975]
This picture immortalizes the signing of the 25-year lease at $25 per year of the 1884 Little Rock School building for the purpose of establishing it as a museum. Pictured, left to right are: A. F. Weaver, President of the Mineral Wells Heritage Association; L. Gordon Nelson, Vice President; Mrs. Gordon Nelson, Chairperson for the Restoration Committee. Seated is Bill Hall, Superintendent of Mineral Wells Schools. The photograph was taken in July, 1975. The Little Rock School, in 2007, remains a museum dedicated to the preservation of the History of Mineral Wells. This picture appears in "Time Was in Mineral Wells...." on page 173. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20247/
[The Mineral Wells Police Force and City/County Ambulance Service]
Shown here is a picture of the Mineral Wells Police force and the City/County Ambulance Service, taken in 1974. From left to right are: Bennie Hutcheson, R.A. Hodges, Jim Elmore, Jimmy Davis, Walter Graves, Orville West, Montiford Parker, Henry Childress, Don Farriel, Larry Brandenburg, Bill Meaders, Raymond Jones, Mike Poe, Ricky Shank, Fred Foreman (Police Chief), Gene Knerr, Gilbert Sommerfield (Investigator), David Jared, and Ronnie Edwards. The information was taken from the back of photograph, which itself was taken at the West City Park. It is published on page 153 of A.F.Weaver's book, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29831/
Moisture and Clouds
This booklet gives an overview of moisture and cloud formations as they relate to aviation. According to the scope notes on the title page, it includes information about "Cloud formation, international classification, abbreviations, and symbols" as well as "General flight conditions associated with stratiform and cumuliform clouds." The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on the last page. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46580/
Mountain Circulation
This booklet gives an overview of mountain circulation as it relates to aviation. According to the scope notes on the title page, it includes information to "Identify mountain circulation patterns, flight hazards, and recommended flight procedures for mountainous operations." The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on the last page. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46572/
[The Old Katie Ware Home, 911 North. Oak]
The old Katie Ware Home is also shown here. The style appears to be Queen Anne, Free Classic sub-style but it shows signs of extensive remodeling. Note the slightly unusual polygonal tower, and the front porch (which also serves as a car-port)that is level with the ground. It was located at 911 N. Oak Street. The photograph was taken taken during June of 1974. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16156/
[The Old Katie Ware Home , 911 North Oak] Avenue
The old Katie Ware Home, of Queen Anne Style, shows possible remodeling. Please note the slightly unusual octagonal tower. Also note the front porch, level with the ground. The building was located at 911 N. Oak Avenue. It has since [2008] been demolished. The picture was taken on taken June of 1974. The picture shows the home from the front. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16157/
[The Old Matt Skeen Home - 516 NE 4th Avenue]
This is a picture of old Matt Skeen Home at 516 NE 4th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas. The porch, the face of the gable, and the differing roof lines all suggest later remodeling. Note the unusual candle-snuffer roof of the unusually-placed tower. The picture was taken June of 1974. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16154/
[Palo Pinto General Hospital]
Palo Pinto General Hospital opened in 1970 and is located west of Mineral Wells. It has been, since this picture was taken, enlarged and remodeled extensively. This hospital replaced the downtown Nazareth Hospital. While the hospital was been built, the first two floors of the Crazy Water Hotel was used as a hospital. This picture is featured in "Time Once Was in Mineral Wells" on page 168. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39173/
[Panorama 1974 (fourth)]
A view of Mineral Wells,is shown, looking southwest from East Mountain over the First National Bank (now Bank of America). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16242/
[Panorama 1974 (ninth)]
A panorama of the Baker Hotel and First United Methodist Church (in front) is show, taken from Welcome Mountain. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16237/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (eleventh)]
A panorama of East Hubbard Street, taken from Welcome Mountain, showing Elmwood cemetery is illustrated here. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16235/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (fifth) ]
A panoramic view, probably from South Mountain, looking north-east is shown here. A portion of the mountain has been dug out and leveled for a gasoline station. Also visible are the Baker Hotel and First National Bank (now Bank of America) to the left of center. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16241/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (first)]
Shown here is a panoramic View of Mineral Wells, Texas taken August 8, 1974. The Baker Hotel and the Crazy Water Hotel are visible. The Convention Center is seen in the far left of the photograph. The view is from West Mountain, looking toward East Mountain over north Mineral Wells. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16245/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (second)]
This picture shows a panoramic view of northwest Mineral Wells from West Mountain, looking toward East Mountain. Included in photograph are the Convention Center, the Box Factory, and the Crazy Water Hotel. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16244/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (seventh)]
A panoramic view of the city from Welcome Mountain is shown. Elmwood Cemetery is visible in the upper left part of the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16239/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (sixth)]
A panorama, taken from West Mountain, looking toward East Mountain over North Oak Street in Mineral Wells. The Convention Center, Box Factory, and The Crazy Water Hotel are visible. Native plants are visible in the foreground. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16240/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (tenth)]
Shown here is a panorama of the Baker Hotel and First United Methodist Church, taken from the west. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16236/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (third)]
illustrated here is a panorama of Mineral Wells, looking east from West Mountain. The Baker Hotel and First National Bank (now Bank of America) are visible in center of photograph. Native plants are pictured in the left of photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16243/
[A Panorama Taken in1974 (eighth)]
A panorama of houses and streets, taken from from Welcome Mountain s shown here. The purpose of the photograph remains uncertain. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16238/
[A Piano Recital, 1 of 10]
A photograph of a piano recital, from a roll of film labeled "Ina Howard Ramsey." Mrs. Ramsey's parents once operated the former Star Boarding House on NW 2nd Street. She is shown playing an upright piano at the base of a stage in the First Presbyterian church's Fellowship Hall. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29441/
[A Piano Recital, 2 of 10]
According to the notes that accompanied this series of negatives, a piano recital was held about the same time as the auction of Mr. Weaver's book, "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells..." Mr. Weaver photographed both events. The piano recital was given in the Fellowship Hall of the First Presbyterian church. Ina Howard Ramsey is the pianist. Mrs. Ramsey was visiting her native home of Mineral Wells at the time. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29440/
[A Piano Recital, 3 of 10]
This photograph was taken from a roll of film labeled, "Ina Howard Ramsey." The note included in this series of pictures suggests that a piano recital was held about the same time as the auction of Mr. Weaver's book. Mr. Weaver photographed both events. The site of the recital was the Fellowship Hall of the First Presbyterian church. Ina Howard Ramsey is the pianist. The recital was an entertainment for the Mineral Wells Heritage Association. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29439/