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Delaware Hotel
The Delaware Hotel, at 316 N. Oak Avenue, is shown here in its glory days. Formerly named "The St. Nicholas Hotel", the Delaware was destroyed by fire. This photograph has been restored. It appears in its original form (as the St. Nicholas) in picture [St. Nicholas Hotel]. The current picture was "modified" with the name changes (to the Delaware) on signs and re-named at the bottom of the picture. At the time it became the Delaware, this was probably the best picture of the structure. (Subsequent adjacent buildings and power lines interfered with the view). The Chautauqua is identifiable at the immediate left and behind the hotel. This version of the picture is on page 104 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells..." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20340/
[The Delaware Hotel Fire]
The Delaware Hotel (formerly the St. Nicholas), at the corner of NE 3rd Street and N. Oak Avenue, is shown in the process of burning down. Also pictured is the Brazos Valley Land Company advertising FARMS RANCHES and CITY PROPERTY. The photograph appears on page 104 of "Time Was...", Second Edition. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20288/
[The Delaware Hotel on fire]
The destruction of the Delaware Hotel in Mineral Wells, Texas is illustrated here. The hotel was located at the corner of N. Oak Avenue and NE 3rd St. The fire was fought by horse-drawn fire wagons and a pumper. Trolley rails visible in middle of unpaved street date the picture as being between 1907, when the street car began operations, and 1914 when the street was paved. A partly obliterated legend on the photograph declares that it was taken by "Ellis." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16277/
[The Demolition of the Convention Hall--1 of 5: Front View]
The metal framework of the Mineral Wells Convention Hall is all that it readily visible during its demolition in 1975/1976. Built on the rock foundation of the Electric Plant that Galbraith had erected in order (Unsuccessfully, it is guessed) to light the city. The Convention Hall was built for the West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention in 1925. It served as the site of numerous local functions including High School Graduation Exercises. The landmark Hexagon Hotel, Mineral Wells' first electrically-lighted hotel, stood on the vacant corner lot in the left foreground of this picture from 1897 to 1959. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29412/
[The Demolition of the Convention Hall, 2 of 5: From a Block Away]
This photograph was taken at an early stage of the demolition of the Mineral Wells Convention Hall on N. Oak Avenue. Built in 1925 to accommodate the West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention, it was constructed on the rock foundation of the electric power plant built by the owner of the Hexagon Hotel to light the city (presumably with DC electricity). The Hexagon Hotel, Mineral Wells' first electrically-lighted hotel, stood on the vacant corner lot in the foreground of this picture. It was torn down in 1959. When the Convention Hall was torn down in 1975, a member of the demolition crew said the new owner of the former London Bridge (to be re-erected at Havasu City in Arizona)was interested in acquiring the rocks to build the foundation for a fort to be constructed at the same site. (One local story credits that interest in the foundation stones as the reason for the demolition of the Convention Hall.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29413/
[The Demolition of the Convention Hall, 4 of 5]
A holograph legend on the back of this picture states: "Tearing down Convention Hall 1976." The photograph illustrates the demolition of the building in full swing. Only the skeleton of the roof remains, and the walls are in ruins. This picture appears in Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells" on page 186. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39234/
[The Demolition of the Convention Hall, 5 of 5]
The Convention Hall met its end in 1979--after forty-five years of use. The exact location of this photograph in relation to the interior of the convention hall remains unknown. The picture shows two Roman arches, which must have been stress-relieving as well as serving as portals of access to various parts of the basement. The ends of two girders, which must have helped support the floor above them, are clearly visible above the nearer arch. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60959/
[The Demolition of the Convention Hall: Interior, 3 of 5]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60958/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 1 of 11: Wood Pile and Building]
The third building of the First Baptist Church was built in 1920; it was used until 1967, at which time it was demolished for the current building. The First Baptist church was originally located in a frame building on the southwest corner of the Crazy block in 1883. A second church was built at the corner of SW 4th Avenue and West Hubbard Street, facing SW 4th Avenue. It was a frame building with two steeples. A brick church, facing Hubbard Street, was erected to accommodate the congregation in 1920. These photographs illustrate the demolition of this building. The present church was erected in 1967 at the corner of SW 4th Avenue and SW 1st Street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29915/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 2 of 11: Another Angle]
The first house of worship of the congregation of First Baptist Church, located in the southwest corner of the Crazy Well block, was purchased in 1883 and was used until 1900. The First Baptist Church was re-located to the corner of W. Hubbard and Pecan Street (now SE 4th Avenue) in 1900, and used until 1967. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29914/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 3 of 11: East View]
The second home of the congregation of the First Baptist Church was built in 1920. It was used until 1967, when it was demolished. The current First Baptist Church is the third one built in the same location. Please see Number 1 of this collection for details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29913/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 4 of 11: The Beginning]
The second home of the congregation of the First Baptist Church was built in 1920. It was used until 1967, at which time it was demolished. The current First Baptist Church building was built in the same location. Please see Number 1 in this series for details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29912/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 5 of 11: Looking Northeast.]
The church building, shown here as being demolished, was built in 1920; and was replaced in 1967 by the present church building. It is the third Baptist church built on this site. Please see photograph number 1 for details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29911/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 6 0f 11: Frame ]
The second home of the congregation of the First Baptist Church was built in 1920; and used until 1967, at which time it was demolished. The current First Baptist Church is the third one built in the same location. Please see photograph number 1 for details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29910/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 7 of 11: Frame and Rubble]
The First Baptist Church's second building was built in 1920, and used until 1967. It was demolished to build the third, and current, church on the same site. Please see photograph number 1 for details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29909/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 8 of 11: Frame of Building]
The second building of the First Baptist Church was built in 1920, and used until 1967. It was then demolished to build the third and current church on the same site. Please see photograph number 1 for details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29908/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 9 of 11: Workers]
Workers are shown helping to demolish the First Baptist Church building in 1967. It was built in 1920. The current building is the third First Baptist Church built on this site. Please see photograph number 1 for details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29907/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 10 of 11: Frame and Rubble]
The second First Baptist Church building was built in 1920, and used until 1967. It was demolished to build the third and current church on the same site. Please see photograph number 1 for details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29906/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 11 of 11: Partially Demolished]
The second First Baptist Church building was built in 1920, and used until 1967. It was demolished to build the third and current church on the same site. Please see photograph number 1 for details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29905/
[A Discus Throw at Elmhurst Park]
This photograph appears to be of a discus-throwing competition at Elmhurst Park. ("Elmhurst Park" is written on the back of the photograph.) A gentleman on the right, leaning on the fence, appears to be holding a tape measure. Please note the spectators on the roof of the building in the background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20322/
[Dismuke's Famous Mineral Crystals Label]
One of the by-products of the water which made Mineral Wells famous was mineral crystals, which were shipped all over the world. Purchasers could dissolve the crystals in tap water and (reportedly) receive the same benefits from the reconstituted water as from the well water. The Famous Water Company and the Famous Crystal Company were founded by Ed Dismuke, a druggist from Waco who came to Mineral Wells for his health. The Famous Water Company is still in operation (under different ownership) and it is the only mineral water company in Mineral Wells at this time. Ed Dismuke is buried in Elmwood Cemetery. He died in 1957 at the age of 97. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24972/
[A District Baptist Meeting]
This is a picture taken by A.F. Weaver during the District Baptist Meeting of 1964, held at the high school football stadium on the west side of town. Miller Stadium, where this photograph was taken, has been replaced by a new one at the High School complex on the east side of town as of March, 2008. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29976/
[A Donkey on 6th Street Mineral Wells, 1916]
Donkeys were still prevalent in 1916, and so were the grass-grown steel tracks of the "Dinky Cars" (Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway which had ceased operations in 1909) on NW 6th Street. The house to the left is an example of the architecture of this time. The source of the photograph is A. F. Weaver's, "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells..." first edition, 1975, on page 82. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24998/
[The Donkey Trail up East Mountain - 1901]
A trail ride, going up East Mountain on burros, is pictured here. The participants listed on back of picture are: "Jessie Padgett - Dallas, Mr. Oscar Levin, Miss [unidentified], Mr. Coy Wimberly - Tyler, Miss [unidentified], Miss Burriss - Terrel, Mr. Jacobs - Atlanta, Lilian Webster - Dallas, Raymond Caruth - Dallas, Johnetta Armstrong - Dallas, Mr. Cousins - Tyler, Maggie Street - Dallas, Katie Elliott - Dallas, Miss Hyman - Min. Wells, Mr. Nance - Dallas, Mr. Brown - Tyler, Mary Roberts - Terrel, Will Caruty - Dallas. Mineral Wells, June 11, 1901." Burro rides on the Donkey Trail up East Mountain were a popular pastime around the turn of the twentieth century. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25001/
[The "Doodle Bug" Interior]
This photograph illustrates the interior of a McKeen motor car, known locally as a "Doodle Bug", with its dust-proof round windows. This one, owned by the Weatherford, Mineral Wells and Northwestern Railway, was an 81-passenger, 70-foot-long, 200-horsepower, gasoline-powered, motor coach. It traveled from Graford through Oran and Salesville to Mineral Wells, thence on to Dallas. It made a round trip daily from 1912 to 1929. There was a turntable at Graford to turn the coach around. There were two "Doodle Bugs" on the WMW&NW. The third similar coach, owned by the Gulf, Texas and Western Railroad (GT&W), traveled from Seymour through Guthrie, and Jacksboro to Salesville beginning in 1913. It proceeded thence over the WMW&NW track to Mineral Wells, and on to Dallas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20357/
[Downtown Mineral Wells: 1 of 3]
This photograph of downtown Mineral Wells was taken looking north on Oak Avenue (US Highway 281) from SE 1st Street (US Highway 180 E). The visible buildings are: (on the left), Hill's Ladies' Apparel, Cole's House of Flowers, (at the intersecting street, [Hubbard Street--US Hwy. 180 W]), and George's Men's Store. Lynch Plaza and a parking lot are on the right, with the Texas Historical Commission marker on the wall in the lower right-hand corner commemorating the first mineral-water well in the City. In the background, the First State Bank can also be seen (also on the intersecting Hubbard Street, US Highway 180 W.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29839/
[Downtown Mineral Wells, 2 of 3: A Different View]
This photograph of downtown Mineral Wells shows (left to right): Hill's Ladies' Apparel; Cole's House of flowers; (Intersecting street): George's Man's Shop; the Professional Building (formerly the Texas Theater); Poston's Dry Goods;Palace Saloon; Marsden's Shoe Store (former Gem theater). The Crazy Hotel is visible in the background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29838/
[Downtown Mineral Wells, 3 of 3: The 100 Block]
This photograph shows downtown Mineral Wells. The dominant building is Mineral Wells Office Supply (formerly Lattner Funeral Home), followed by R.P.'s Western Outlet; next door: Jann's Boutique; next, Jann's Fashions. Next is Hill's Style Shoppe. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29837/
[Downtown Mineral Wells, Texas : January 11, 1919]
Downtown Mineral Wells, Texas is shown here, as taken on January 11, 1919. The first Crazy Hotel is the prominent building in the right middle portion of the picture. The first Roman Catholic Church can be seen on the side of West Mountain in the upper middle of the picture and the old High School, the "Little Rock School", and the West Ward School are at the base of West Mountain in the far upper left part of the picture. The Dr. A.W. Thompson home is at the foot of East Mountain in the lower middle foreground of the picture. The wide street in the left middle of the picture is NW 2nd Street, looking west. The First Presbyterian Church is the domed building on the right of 2nd Street at NW 4th Avenue, near the far end of NW 2nd Street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29459/
[Downtown Park]
This photograph shows one of several city parks maintained by the ladies of Mineral Wells. Some pictures identify one or the other of these parks as "Wylie Park." It may be that the separate parks on vacant lots throughout the town were all part of a civic "Wylie Park" program. The Cannas here are quite tall. Brick work edging of the flower beds kept the grass from invading the garden. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25097/
[Dr. J.H. McCracken Home, 1 of 3: Little Rock School and Fannin School]
The Dr. J.H. McCracken home was built in 1904 at 516 W. Hubbard Street, and was restored by Gil Hull. Joseph Hill McCracken was born on a farm near Springtown, Texas, October 1, 1867. He graduated from the University of Tennessee Medical School in 1891, and returned to Texas. On October 15, 1895, he married Marie Sue Wilson, the daughter of Oliver Loving's youngest daughter, Margaret. He was elected President of the Texas Medical Association in 1911, and practiced medicine in Mineral Wells for over fifty years. He frequently laughed about having "delivered babies of babies of babies." Dr. McCracken died in March of 1954, and his wife died in November of 1955. Both are buried in Mineral Wells' Woodland Park Cemetery. Professor John N, McCracken, who established the Mineral Wells College directly across the street west of the McCracken home, is believed to be Dr. McCracken's father. [For details of the Mineral Wells College, please see the picture "Mineral Wells School,Texas"] The "Old High School" and the "Little Rock School" (left side of the picture) are visible in the background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29845/
[Dr. J.H. McCracken Home, 2 of 3]
The Dr. J.H. McCracken home built in 1904 at 516 West Hubbard Street, and was restored by Gil Hull. Joseph Hill McCracken was born on a farm near Springtown, Texas, October 1, 1867. He graduated from the University of Tennessee Medical School in 1891, and returned to Texas. On October 15, 1895, he married Marie Sue Wilson, the daughter of Oliver Loving's youngest daughter, Margaret. He was elected President of the Texas Medical Association in 1911, and practiced medicine in Mineral Wells for over fifty years. He frequently laughed about having "delivered babies of babies of babies." Dr. McCracken died in March of 1954, and his wife died in November of 1955. Both are buried in Mineral Wells' Woodland Park Cemetery. Professor John N, McCracken, who established the Mineral Wells College directly across the street west of the McCracken home, is believed to be Dr. McCracken's father. [For details of the Mineral Wells College, please see the picture "Mineral Wells School, Texas."] texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29850/
[Dr. J.H. McCracken Home, 3 of 3: Different View]
The Dr. J.H. McCracken home, built in 1904 at 516 West Hubbard, and restored by Gil Hull. Joseph Hill McCracken was born on a farm near Springtown, Texas, October 1, 1867. He graduated from the University of Tennessee Medical School in 1891, and returned to Texas. He married Marie Sue Wilson, the daughter of Oliver Loving's youngest daughter, Margaret on October 15, 1895. He was elected President of the Texas Medical Association in 1911 and practiced medicine in Mineral Wells for over fifty years. He frequently laughed about having "delivered babies of babies of babies." Dr. McCracken died in March of 1954, and his wife died in November of 1955. Both are buried in Mineral Wells' Woodland Park Cemetery. Professor John N. McCracken, who established the Mineral Wells College directly across the street west of the McCracken home, is believed to be Dr. McCracken's father. [For details of the Mineral Wells College, please see the picture "Mineral Wells School, Texas"] texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29842/
[Drinking Pavilion in the Crazy Hotel]
A caption on the back of the photograph states, "This picture, taken in the 1930's, shows the drinking pavilion in the [lacuna] Crazy Hotel." Recognizable are Boyce Ditto, standing third from right; N.E. Adams, last on the right, standing reading a newspaper; and Mrs. Veale, mother of Cecil Young, seated on left. Many people came to Mineral Wells to bathe and to "Drink their way to health" at the many wells and pavilions that catered to the public. This drinking pavilion is still extant, just off the lobby of the "Crazy" (now [2008] a retirement home), but it no longer dispenses mineral water. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25069/
[Dry Cleaning Bag from Baker Hotel]
A dry-cleaning bag from the Baker Hotel in Mineral Wells, Texas is shown here. The bag has an image of the hotel, taken from the front, as well as "The Baker Hotel - Mineral Wells, Texas, World Famous Health Resort". Further information on this artifact has not been forthcoming. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16325/
Dry Goods--W.H.H.Hightower
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60912/
DUPLICATE OF The Bimini Bath House, Mineral Wells, Texas
A photograph of an old postal card showing the Bimini Mineral Bath House, later known as "The Wagley Building." It was constructed by Goodrum, Murphy, and Croft and located at 114 NW 4th Street. A vintage automobile is shown at right side of the picture. This building was demolished before 2008. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16178/
[Dust-proof, Round Windows of Motor Chair Car]
An interior view of a McKeen motor car, called by the locals "Doodle Bug", showing its dust-proof, round windows. Two of these 70-foot, 200-horsepower, gasoline-powered, 81-passenger motor cars made a round trip daily from Graford, Texas, through Mineral Wells to Dallas from June 11,1912 to April 23, 1929. They were joined March 27, 1913 by a similar coach on the Gulf Texas & Western (GT&W) line that ran from Seymour through Olney and Jacksboro to Salesville where it traveled over the WMW&NW (Weatherford, Mineral Wells,& Northwestern) rails through Mineral Wells and on to Dallas. This picture is on page 93 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells...", First Edition, 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20366/
[An E-mail Dated 3/9/'99 to A. F. Weaver from Dr. Meyer, of Texas A&M]
An e-mail to A.F. Weaver, concerning Ike Sablosky, written by Greg Meyer of Texas A & M, March 9, 1999. Mr. Weaver apparently had inquired about Mr. Sablosky in connection with a photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29809/
[An Early Bird's-Eye-View of Mineral Wells]
A very early panoramic view of Mineral Wells (taken around 1882) from East Mountain and looking southwest is illustrated here. Locations identified by numbers are: 1: Judge Lynch's cabin, now Lynch Plaza at S. Oak Avenue and E. Hubbard Street; 2: The Mesquite Street well, middle of NE 1st Avenue (the second well in town, now [2008] abandoned); 3:The current center of downtown Mineral Wells, showing the intersection of Oak Avenue (US 281) and Hubbard Street (US Highway 180); 4: The current Fire and Police Departments; 5: S. Oak Avenue; 6: The Southern House Hotel; 7: The present "Business District", NE 1st Avenue; and 8: N. Oak Avenue (a residential area at the time.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20219/
[An Early Car at the Crazy Well Flats]
Frank Richards (The driver, identified as "Dad") sits in a Thomas Flyer, parked at the Crazy Pavilion, in late October (or early November) of 1909. Dust on the car, extra spare tires, and a sign on the spares, indicate they have been involved in a "Pathfinder Endurance" run (from Fort Worth to San Angelo) for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. The driver and passenger are dressed in typical "duster" clothing for cross-country travel. Frank Richards went on to maintain a successful Abstract company in Mineral Wells. His father, Thomas Richards, had the Star Wells Company in Mineral Wells. A cigar sign in the window suggests this was the drug store, then located in the southeast corner of the Crazy Flats. A sign on the hotel also advertises rooms for rent in addition to its being a mineral water drinking pavilion. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25082/
[An Early Couple]
This picture is probably a photographic portrait of Col. and Mrs. W.R. Austin, mentioned on page 54 of "Time Was in Mineral Wells..." second edition. He established the Austin Well where "Blind Nellie" was employed. See also, [Col. and Mrs. W. Riess Austin] texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20239/
[An Early Delivery Truck]
An early delivery truck, whose wording (on the side reads) "R.O. Norman, Tailor, Cleaning & Pressing, phone 514", is shown here. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20454/
[Early Downtown Mineral Wells]
This early view of the west side of Mesquite Street (In 2008: NE 1st Avenue) from a vantage near the "old Post Office", looking south toward the depot. (This is a cropped version of the picture that appears on page 44 of "TIME WAS ...." by A.F. Weaver). The building on the right with the arched windows was M. H. Coleman's Clothing and Shoes for gentlemen at 205 N.E. First Avenue. The light sandstone building on the right is the Yeager Building. The Lion Drug Store was located in it, as indicated by the lion figure on top of the building. Please observe the unpaved street, and the shallow ruts formed in it. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20446/
[An Early Oil Field]
An early oil field, probably in Palo Pinto County, is shown here. The photograph, perhaps a composite of several smaller ones, as originally in the possession of M. A. Howell, who was once the county surveyor. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20342/
[An Early Panoramic View of Mineral Wells, Texas: 1882]
This photograph is an early panoramic view of Mineral Wells (taken approximately in 1882) from East Mountain, looking Southwest. Numbers on the photograph represent specific locations: 1. Judge Lynch's cabin, location of the first mineral water well; 2. N E 1st Avenue (second water well dug); 3. Oak Avenue and Hubbard Street; 4. Present location of the Fire and Police Station; 5. South Oak Avenue; 6. The Commercial Hotel (present location of the Gas Co.) 7. NE 1st Avenue business district; 8. North Oak Avenue. Note: The picture identifies number 6 as "The Commercial Hotel", but that hotel has been determined to have been located on South Oak Avenue. The hotel shown in the picture was the Early-Southern Hotel, which an 1893 guidebook clearly states was on Hubbard Street. The guidebook goes on to give the hotel's further location as "[O]n the same block with the post-office [sic] and three blocks from the depot." A Mr. Early is named as the proprietor. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20218/
[An Early Parade on N. Oak Avenue]
A parade on N. Oak Avenue around the turn of the twentieth century is shown here. The Hexagon House (at the right center of the picture) was built in 1897, and a street car ran down the middle of the street from 1907 to 1913 (no tracks are visible here). Please observe the condition of the street. It was not paved until 1914. The Vichy Well drinking pavilion (later known as the Standard Well) is visible on the right skyline. This pavilion was torn down for the USO at the beginning of World War II. The large two-story building at the left middle of the picture was the Carlsbad Hotel. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20354/
[An Early Photograph of Mineral Wells on a Bottle]
This picture illustrates an early Mineral Wells photograph on a bottle-shaped brochure. It was taken from Welcome Mountain, and attached to the bottle. Identifiable in the picture is Poston's Dry Goods building near the bottom middle of the picture,the Catholic church at the top left of the picture, and the rear of Dr. A. W. Thompson's residence in the near middle of the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20309/
[An Early Street Scene in Mineral Wells]
This photograph shows the corner of Mesquite and Coke Streets (Now [2008] NE 1st Avenue and NE 2nd Street) The picture was taken in 1912 after the Ben Hur motor car had stopped running (note its tracks). The Whatley Motor Company is now located where the Livery Stable was on the left at the time of the picture. The "Old Post Office" replaced the buildings on the right, and the Chautauqua was the large white building a block further up the street at the center. Information about this photograph was taken from A. F. Weaver's book "Time Was in Mineral Wells...", on page 82. The former Coke Street is labeled "Moore Street" (which was actually four blocks further north). The picture dates to 1905 when the "Dinky" car operation began and the Chautauqua was constructed. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20425/
[An Early View of Mesquite Street]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60916/