You limited your search to:

  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 Language: No Language
[Three Women and a Man In Front of a Car]
Three unknown women and a man are shown standing in front of a large automobile. The man sports a celluloid collar & a straw hat. One lady carries a reticule, another an umbrella. Benches are visible behind them all. The date of the picture is also unknown. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39247/
[Three Women at a Swimming Pool]
Three women are shown at the "old" Mineral Wells City Pool. A male lifeguard, to their right, looks on unconcernedly. Only one woman can be identified: Jill Hickey, Mineral Wells High School graduate of 1966,the woman on the right, now Jill Hickey Moore of Stafford, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16189/
[The Thurber Smokestack and Related Buildings]
Thurber, Texas: A dirt road meets another road in distance; a smoke stack stands in distance; a red fire-house with white roof shows to left. A building, in the far left, now [2008] houses the eponymous Smokestack Cafe. An historic plaque can be seen at the base of the smokestack, but it cannot be read from this photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38092/
[The Thurber Tipple and Thurber Monument]
Photograph of buildings in Thurber, Texas, taken from a parking lot. A gas station is on the left; it has a second story serving as an overhang as well as a taller platform with a railing and the words "Thurber Tipple" written near the roof. A car is parked at the gas station and a couple is looking inside the engine. The Thurber smokestack is visible near the center of the photograph and several unidentified buildings are on the left. Three other cars are parked on the left side of the photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29460/
[Time Was, 1st Edition, Auction, 1 of 8, Mayor H. Authur Zappe ]
When the book, "Time Was in Mineral Wells," First Edition, by A. F. Weaver was published in 1975, the first ten copies were autographed by the author and auctioned to the highest bidder. The auction was held at the "Little Rock Schoolhouse", and shows Mayor H. Arthur Zappe addressing the crowd in attendance at the auction. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29431/
[Time Was, 1st Edition, Auction, 2 of 8, A. F. Weaver]
This picture shows Ed Ford, standing before the picture he had painted of Mineral Wells' First Public School. It was built in 1884, and restored in 1975 by The Mineral Wells Heritage Association as a museum to preserve the history of the city. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29422/
[Time Was, 1st Edition, Auction, 3 of 8, Reverend Mr. Bobby Moore]
The picture shows the auctioneer, the Reverend Mr. Bobby Moore, acknowledging a bid on a First Edition print of A. F. Weaver's "Time Was in Mineral Wells." To the auctioneer's right is author A. F. Weaver. The author's wife, Patsy, is standing in the window to the author's right. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29429/
[Time Was, 1st Edition, Auction, 4 of 8, Reverend Mr. Bobby Moore Auctioneer ]
The auction of copies of the first Edition of "Time Was in Mineral Wells," by A. F. Weaver, was held at the "Little Rock Schoolhouse." The auctioneer, the Reverend Bobby Moore, is asking for bids on a copy in this picture. The author, A. F. Weaver, stands between the windows to the auctioneer's right. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29428/
[Time Was, 1st Edition, Auction, 8 of 8, Auctioneer]
The auction of copies of the first edition of "Time Was in Mineral Wells..." by A. F. Weaver, held at the "Little Rock Schoolhouse." This picture shows the auctioneer, the Reverend Mr. Bobby Moore, with the autographed Copy Number 1. Author A.F. Weaver looks on in the background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29430/
[The Tour of Homes, 1976, (1)]
A home, apparently of Neo-classical style, located at 516 NE 3rd Avenue. This home was built in 1909 by J. S. Murphy. It was owned in 1976 by Kenneth and Mary Brewer. This negative was part of a collection of photographs take by A. F. Weaver, and was found in an envelope marked "Homes, Tour of, 4/76" The following names were listed: "McFall, Brewer, Catrett, John Moore, Hull, McLaughlin." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20275/
[The Tour of Homes, 1976, (2)]
This concrete-block house, of Queen Anne style, free classic subtype, parapeted gable, was built in 1904 by Robert Wylie, rancher, at 416 NW 6th Street. This view is of the front, southern elevation of the house. There are 10 room and 8 fireplaces (all coal-burning), each one unique, and believed to have been imported. There are many stained- and leaded-glass windows. The house was purchased in 1917 by the attorney of Mrs. Wylie, Judge W.H. Gross. The Gross family lived there until Mrs. Gross' death in 1952. Subsequent owners were the Luther Waddy family, and Mr. and Mrs. Jack Catrett in 2006. Another view of it is in "Time Was...", by A. F. Weaver, on page 141. This negative was part of a collection of photographs taken by A. F. Weaver, and was found in an envelope marked "Homes, Tour of, 4/76" The following names were listed: "McFall, Brewer, Catrett, John Moore, Hull, McLaughlin." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20273/
[The Tour of Homes, 1976, (4)]
This picture illustrates the McFall home, three miles west of the city of Mineral Wells. It was opened in 1927 as the Indian Creek Brazos Valley School. It saw use as a community center, and as a polling place from 1946 to 1970. The McFall's purchased it and converted it into a residence. This negative was part of a collection of photos take by A. F. Weaver and was found in an envelope marked "Homes, Tour of, 4/76" The following names were listed: "McFall, Brewer, Catrett, John Moore, Hull, McLaughlin." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20277/
[The Tour of Homes, 1976, (5)]
The Cunningham House (502 NW 23rd Street, Mineral Wells, Texas) was built in the 1930's. It is in Italian Renaissance style, and it shows evidence of later remodeling. It later became the home of E.B. Ritchie, Palo Pinto County Judge from 1904 to 1908. Judge Ritchie was the first of four generations (son George M., grandson John P., great grandson Richard P.) of attorneys and civic Leaders in Palo Pinto County. This negative was part of a collection of photographs take by A. F. Weaver and was found in an envelope marked "Homes, Tour of, 4/76" The following names were listed: "McFall, Brewer, Catrett, John Moore, Hull, McLaughlin." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20270/
[Trolley Tracks]
Tracks for electric trolley are shown here, being laid along Hubbard Street, at the corner of Oak Avenue and looking east. The Mineral Wells north-south electric railway ran south on Oak Avenue, from approximately NE 9th Street, to SW 21st street, then west to Pollard Creek. The creek was dammed up to form a lake around which a casino, dance pavilion, race track for horses, and playground were built. Elmhurst Park, as it was called, was abandoned when the trolley ceased operations in 1913. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20362/
[Twenty Men and One Woman in Front of a Building]
Illustrated here are 20 unidentified men (some in uniform) and 1 unidentified woman standing in front of an unidentified building. Four of the men have removed their hats. The dress of the woman suggests the early 1920's. The occasion is not known. The photograph taken by Young's Studio of Mineral Wells, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39252/
[Two Men and a Woman]
This picture shows two unidentified men and a woman. The photograph is believed to have been taken during construction of the road up Wynn Mountain east of Palo Pinto (prior to construction of the Bankhead Highway, which was built following passage of "Good Roads Act" in 1916.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16280/
Two Unidentified Men on Welcome Mountain
Two unidentified men are here seen sitting on a bench on East Mountain. The photograph is believed to have been taken about the year 1920. Benches were located atop East Mountain for the benefit of visitors who climbed the 1,000 steps from NE 3rd Street. East Mountain became better known as WELCOME Mountain after the WELCOME sign was erected in 1922. The sign was the largest non-commercial electric sign in the world and was a gift from George Holmgreen (Governor of the Texas Rotary Club) owner of the San Antonio Iron Works, following the State Rotary Convention the previous year. The sign was moved east to Bald Mountain in 1972. [A careful examination of the photograph suggests that the two men are possibly holding hands under a blanket which has been laid across both laps.] texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16226/
[Two women in a Wheelbarrow]
Two unknown young ladies are shown posing in a wheelbarrow in Wylie Park, located in the 100 block of NE 2nd Street (see page 115 of "Time Was", second edition). Wylie Park seems to have been a project of the local ladies' garden Club, who developed various empty areas around town into garden plots. The first Catholic church on the side of West Mountain appears to be barely visible in the far distance, indicating that the photograph has been taken looking to the west. The photograph unfortunately bears no date. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20427/
[Two Women in Wylie Park]
Two women are pictured strolling in Wylie Park. Notes on back of the photograph read: "Corner of N. Oak and N.E. 1st Street, the West side of Wylie Park, a popular place for strolling." N. Oak Avenue is in background, with North to the right in the picture. Hazelwood Drugs is on the west side of Oak Ave, opposite the park. Mineral Wells. The streets of Mineral Wells were paved in the summer of 1914. A wagon can be seen traveling north on Oak Avenue. What appears to be a work crew may be seen at the corner indicates that the finishing touches may have been in the process of being applied to the paving as the picture was taken. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20441/
[The Tygrett House]
The Tygrett Hotel, built as a Room-and-Board Hotel about 1910, is still located at 415 NW 4th Street. The house is named "Silk Stocking Row" at this time [2008], and is currently Mineral Wells' only Bed and Breakfast Inn. The house is Queen Anne style, free classic sub-type. Note the unusual two-story wrap-around porch and the the polygonal tower. The Palladian windows and classic columns are characteristic of this sub-type. This photograph appears on page 105 of the "Time Was"..., Second Edition. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20289/
U.S. O. Club, Mineral Wells, Texas
The only information available about this photograph is solely the legend on it, identifying it as the U.S.O. Club of Mineral Wells, Texas. Further details in regard to this club would be welcome. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39182/
[An Un-named Water Well]
Since the mineral water that was needed for commercial purposes did not flow in convenient springs, it was necessary to pump it out of the ground by way of wells. The wells were abandoned when the fad for the water evaporated. For example, what remains of this water well(only its head)is at the North West corner of NW 9th Street and NW 3rd Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39225/
[The Una McLaughlin Home]
The "Una McLaughlin" home is located on NW 23rd Street. This photograph was taken in July, 1975. Built in 1927 by J.C. Cunningham, an oil operator. The home was sold in 1931 to Judge E.B. Ritchie. It was purchased in 1973 by Una McLaughlin. The tile in the living room fireplace is the same as used in the Baker Hotel. The tile, stained glass in the breakfast room, and the light fixtures are in the Art Deco style. The architectural style of the house is Italian Renaissance. It shows signs of remodeling. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16174/
[An Unknown Boarding House]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60895/
[Unloading Grain From Box Cars]
This picture depicts men unloading grain from box cars at the Mineral Wells railroad yards into horse-drawn wagons. During the days if the Great Depression years of the 1930's, grain and cotton were the principal cash crops of farmers around Mineral Wells, and Mineral Wells' WMW&NW Railroad was a prime shipper of the crops to market. This photograph is featured on page 92 of A.F. Weaver's "Time Was in Mineral Wells," second edition. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20372/
[A View from East Mountain about 1901-1912]
A view from East Mountain, looking southwest with West Mountain at right, taken in the interval about 1901-1912, is shown here. In the left foreground is the Thompson house on NE 2nd Avenue. This house was built in 1896 as a wedding present for [Mrs.]Thompson. To the right of this house is the Mineral Wells Sanatorium. The Baker Hotel and the Crazy Water Hotel were not yet built. In the far right of the photograph is First Baptist Church, on the block between 4th and 5th Avenues and Hubbard and West 1st Streets. The first Catholic church is shown at the top right, near the base of West Mountain. The Yeager Block (Drug Store)is the large white sandstone building in the left-middle of the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16231/
[A View From South Mountain Toward East Mountain]
A view from South Mountain, toward East Mountain, before the Baker Hotel was built in the 1929 is shown here. The Old Post Office building, built in 1912, is in the upper left quadrant. This picture is one of 17 negatives that were in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma, 73069), postmarked "Aug. 4, 1975", and addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography. Also on the envelope were some telephone numbers and "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield)." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20382/
[A View from West Mountain, about 1912]
This photograph was taken after the Chautauqua was demolished (that is, about 1912). The foundation can be seen in the upper right quadrant. The Post Office, completed in 1913, is visible to the right of the Chautauqua ruins. The old viewing tower on the top of the hill, destroyed by a tornado in 1930, is just barely visible in the trees on top of the hill. The first Crazy Hotel and Crazy Flats drinking pavilion, which burned in 1925, are seen one block northwest of the Post Office. The Murphy home is on top of the hill in the middle of the photograph. The Hexagon Hotel (torn down in 1959) is just above and left of the center. The Vichy Well is just to the right of the Hexagon House, and is now the location of the North Oak Community Center. In the the next block north (left) of the Hexagon House, facing west, is the Fairfield Inn with a ground-level entrance on each floor. Note the city's water tower at left center. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20256/
[A View of Mesquite Street, Mineral Wells]
An early scene of Mesquite Street (now [2008] NE 1st Avenue) looking North toward old U.S. Post Office from the corner of East Hubbard Street. Electrical lines are present as are cars and trucks typical of the post-1914 era, when the streets of Mineral Wells were paved. The cornerstone for the Post Office was laid in May, 1912. The building on the near right housed Campbell's Bargain store. It occupied the site of the current Baker Hotel (Opened in 1929.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16286/
[A View of Mineral Wells]
A panoramic view of Mineral Wells, possibly taken from East Mountain. This picture was sent to A.F. Weaver, in 1975, from Charles Windell Simonds of Norman, Oklahoma, with a note indicating they were taken by his father (Clarence Winfield Simonds) on January 11,1919. The view appears to be from East Mountain looking southwest. A power plant is visible in the right center of this picture, but other landmarks have not been identified. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29458/
[A View of Mineral Wells from East Mountain]
A view from East Mountain, looking down on Mineral Wells and taken about 1910, includes: The First United Methodist Church, the Yeager Building, and the train depot in the background. This photograph was taken before the Baker Hotel was built. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16219/
[A View of Mineral Wells from East Mountain]
A view of Mineral Wells and South Mountain, taken from atop East Mountain is shown here. Notable buildings are the West Ward School next to the "Little Rock" school house in upper right and Poston Dry Goods in left-center. The photograph was taken before the second high school was built in 1914. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16229/
[A View of Mineral Wells from East Mountain]
A view of Mineral Wells from East Mountain looking west along NW 3rd Street is shown here. Visible landmarks include: The first Crazy Water Hotel, (built in two sections in 1911 and 1912) with its common lobby entrance on NW 3rd Street; the U.S. Post Office in the left foreground; the first Roman Catholic Church on the side of West Mountain at NW 3rd Street; Mineral Wells High School; West Ward School in the gap between West and South Mountains; and the Presbyterian Church on NW 2nd Street, one block northeast of West Ward School. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16216/
[A View of Mineral Wells from East Mountain]
This is a view of Mineral Wells, taken from East Mountain, looking southwest. Poston Dry Goods (now [2008]the Palo Pinto County Courthouse annex)is shown in the left foreground); the First Baptist Church (upper right); the Dr. A.W. Thompson residence in middle foreground, with Mineral Wells Sanatorium to its right (west). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16220/
[A View of Mineral Wells From South Mountain]
A view of Mineral Wells, looking north from South Mountain, taken after 1929, is pictured here. The front of the old Mineral Wells High School is visible in the lower left corner. The Crazy Hotel is just to the right of center. This picture comes from one of 17 (4X4) negatives that were found in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma, 73069), addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography and postmarked Aug. 4, 1975. Also on the envelope were some telephone numbers and the remark "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield)." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20384/
[A View of NE 1st Avenue]
In this view of NE 1st Avenue, the Old Post Office Building is shown at the end of the street and at the left of the picture. It is now [2007] The Woman's Club. The Baker Hotel (apparently under construction) can be seen at the far right of the picture. The Southwestern Bell Telephone Company building in the center of the picture sits across NE 1st Street, and to the north of the Baker. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29862/
[D. W. Griffith]
D. W. Griffith is shown standing on the roof of the new Crazy Hotel, which opened in 1927 and replaced the First Crazy Hotel which had burned in 1925. Mr. Griffith, who produced silent movies including the "Keystone Kops" comedies, and the classic film "Birth of a Nation", was a guest at the Crazy Hotel while visiting Mineral Wells in 1929. A commemorative postage stamp was issued in his honor on May 27, 1975. Mr. Griffith was impressed by the "WELCOME" sign on East Mountain (the world's largest non-commercial, electrically-lighted sign at the time). He developed the "HOLLYWOOD HILLS" addition with other partners when he returned to California, and he erected what is probably the most recognizable landmark in America: The HOLLYWOOD sign in Los Angeles. Both signs have survived similar difficult times in their histories. This picture appears on page 19 of A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells", second edition, 1974. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38073/
[W. W. Howard's Hardware Store]
The Howard Hardware store was once located at 101 E. Hubbard St. The dimness of the store makes discerning the items on sale difficult. A double row of "air-tight" stoves ranks down the center, flanked at the foreground by a display of guns. Persons identified in picture are: Helin Howard, Flora Howard, A. L. Howard and one unidentified person. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39215/
[Walker's Grocery and Market]
Shown here is the J.J. Walker Grocery & Market, once located at 614 Southeast 6th Avenue. The picture is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 176. The identities of the three people pictured is not known. Note, however, the hand-operated gasoline pumps, the oil pumps in the background, and a sign that advertises Texaco gasoline at 18 cents per gallon! texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39212/
[The Weatherford, Mineral Wells, Northwestern Railroad Depot]
The Weatherford, Mineral Wells, and Northwestern (WMW&NW) Railroad began operations October 1,1891. The Texas & Pacific Railway bought out the WMW&NW in 1902, and shortly thereafter built this depot to replace a former wooden structure that had been destroyed by fire. The rail line had a colorful history, operating through World War II and into the 1990's. Construction of an extension of the line to the city of Oran was completed in 1907, and on to Graford the following January. In 1912 two McKeen motor coaches (called "Doodlebugs" by the locals)were added. These were self-contained, 200 Horsepower, 70-foot long, gasoline-powered, 80-passenger coaches which provided service between Mineral Wells, Weatherford, Fort Worth and Dallas. A round trip took less than six hours, and two "Doodlebugs" provided service in each direction every three hours. In 1913, the Gulf Texas and Western Railroad, building south from Seymour, Texas, began operations over the WMW&NW line from Salesville to Mineral Wells, thus connecting the cities of Seymour, Olney, Jacksboro, Graford, Oran, Salesville, Mineral Wells, and Weatherford with daily round-trip service to Dallas. In 1928, passenger traffic had declined to a point that passenger service was discontinued, and did not resume until the nation began mobilizing for World War II in 1940. Nearly a half million troops (429,966) passed through the depot during the war years in transit to and from Ft. Wolters training base. The City of Mineral Wells bought the 22.8 miles of track to Weatherford October 1, 1989. It was the last operator, and kept the road open for freight traffic, for the benefit of local businesses. The passenger depot was restored after the trains ceased operations, and it is now [2008] the offices of the Elliott Waldren Abstract Company, and lawyer George Gault. The right-of-way from Mineral Wells to Weatherford was converted to a Texas Parks and Wildlife trail in June 1998. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29853/
[The Wells Hotel]
This is a picture of the Wells Hotel, in the W. E. Mayes Building, once located on the northwest corner of NW 1st Avenue and NW 3rd Street. This photograph appears on page 105 of the "Time Was", Second Edition. Please note the complete lack of automobiles in the picture. Although it is not apparent from the photograph, the street is not likely to have been paved. The picture was most likely taken in the early years of the twentieth century. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20296/
[The West Ward School]
Exterior of the West Ward School in Mineral Wells, TX. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16348/
[West Ward School]
This photograph appears to have been given to A. W. Weaver with the following information on the back of it: "Wasn't it Whittier who said 'Still stately stands the old school house, beside the babbling brook'?--well this one no longer stands. It was a firm & strong old building when they tore it down 4 years ago. I thought you would cherish this picture as a fond recollection of yours, mine & Hugh's school days & days of happy childhood, where, as we romped & played barefoot in the soft sands & green grass, we were not as yet familiar with the hidden stones & thorns that one encounters down the highway of life. "All the sheet metal contained in the top of this building including the tin roof was made & fabricated by Papa in Grandpa's store. The metal work consists of the ornamental cornice fittings, the steeples at each corner of the building, metal banisters on the roof top, pinnacles around cupolas, flag pole with large metal ball on top & all drain piping and roof ventilators. "The barren oak trees in the yard are very familiar. Far to the right, not shown in the picture were several mesquite trees, whose limbs were platted & tied in knots when they were saplings, by Grandpa Caylor. The trees grew in the fantastic shapes. All school boys were mystified at the strange shape of the trees and Grandpa was amused." The school was located at 205 NW 5th Ave. It is both interesting and amazing how much of our history is not evident in the pictures that preserve such a vital part of it. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20214/
[The West Ward School]
The West Ward School is shown with "Dinky Car" tracks in foreground. The picture was taken around 1909. The first Mineral Wells School with a graduating class, built in 1902, it was located just north of Little Rock School on NW 5th Avenue. Mineral Wells' first High School graduation class, consisted of four students in 1903, as evinced by a photograph in "Time Was...", page 189. It was later named "Houston School" in 1915. The West Ward School was subsequently torn down. Another school, constructed on SW 4th Avenue, was then named "Houston School." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20246/
[Women in a Truck]
An unknown group of six women is shown posing on a truck. The type of truck is also not known. There are two photographs of this group of women with not a clue concerning who they were. See also, the photograph "Five Women on Bridge." The Bimini Bath House is in the background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20456/
[The Woodmen of the World Convention at the Chautauqua]
The caption of this picture, shown on page 50 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver, states: "Part of the Woodmen of the World convention men gathered in front of the Chautauqua [building] for this picture in 1911. Many thousand attended." Note the men in two of the trees to the right of the observer, and also those sitting on top of the sign at the left of the picture. The building was demolished, probably during the following year, 1912. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39214/
[The Zappe Home -- NW 4th Avenue]
Trees in full foliage in July of 1975 obscure the Zappe House on NW 4th Avenue. This Tudor-style home with a native sandstone porch was built in 1929 by Mr. R.S. (Bob) Dalton, a pioneer rancher and developer of the Dalton oilfield in north Palo Pinto County. Dr. H. Arthur Zappe, a local dentist, member of the Texas State Board of Dental Examiners, and former mayor of Mineral Wells, bought the house in 1947. The house is currently [2011] owned by an oculist, Dr. Adams. There are arched entrances throughout the house, leaded and stained-glass windows, French doors, stippled stucco walls and doors that are inlaid with mahogany panels. In addition to fireplaces, the house obtains heat from gas-fired steam radiators. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16153/