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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[An Early View of Mineral Wells, Left Portion]
An early panoramic view of Mineral Wells, looking from the South Mountain to the northeast is shown here. Note: The Hexagon House (middle upper right), First Baptist Church (two white spires in middle right), Chautauqua (far upper right), West Ward School (large building at left middle with "Little Rock School" immediately to this side). [This is the left portion of a contiguous pair of pictures that make up this view. The right portion of the photograph is shown following.] texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16212/
[An Early View of Mineral Wells: Right Portion]
An early panoramic view of Mineral Wells from South Mountain looking northeast, this picture gives the other side of a photograph, which, with the preceding, comprise one picture. The Exchange Hotel (upper left of the picture below East Mountain, with Dr. Thompson's home to its immediate right is visible) This is approximately the northeast edge of the City Business District, but other landmarks cannot be identified. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16211/
[The East Side of the (Third) First Presbyterian Church Building]
This picture shows the back (east) side of the third First Presbyterian Church of Mineral Wells, Texas. It features an arched window, and (presumably) the dedicatory cornerstone. Due to structural damage, this building was torn down in the 1980's, and replaced with the fourth First Presbyterian Church - the third building at 300 NW 4th Avenue. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25008/
[The East Ward School]
This photograph, taken around 1909, shows the East Ward School. Built in 1906, and located at 400 NE 9th Avenue, this served as Mineral Wells' first High School as well as an elementary school. It was closed in 1930, and Murphy and Murphy Concrete is now at this location. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20242/
[Ellis White Shows Off the Book About Mineral Wells]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60905/
[Elmer Seybold With a Rifle]
Elmer Seybold [(?)-1979] replaces the ramrod on a reproduction rifle. A powder horn & other paraphernalia are visible in foreground. The presence of a small card catalog in the background establishes the locale of this performance to be the old Boyce Ditto Library, in what is now [2013] part of the City Hall complex. The date of Mr. Seybold's presentation is unknown. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39243/
Elmhurst Park
This illustration appears to be a picture postcard of the entrance to Elmhurst Park, an amusement park on Pollard Creek, about five miles southwest of Mineral Wells. The park operated from 1907 to 1913, and was a major attraction in "the nation's most popular health spa" at that time. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20326/
[An Engraving of a Crowd of Men]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60964/
[The Entrance to Camp Wolters]
Found on page 158 of "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells" by A. F. Weaver, the caption to this picture reads, "Entrance to the original Camp Wolters around the 1930's. This entrance was located near and behind the present National Guard Armory." The Texas National Guard 112th Cavalry Service Troop maintained an armory on West Mountain, from a time before 1923. The hill itself was dubbed "Cavalry Hill." The Service Troop was later re-named 124th Cavalry, Troop F--which attained to fame as part of the task force that cleared the Burma Road in World War II. Camp Wolters was built for summer training of the Texas National Guard in 1927. It was to be used for a minimum of three weeks each year. The famous CCC (The Civilian Conservation Corps) stayed in the camp in 1930, and built several of the rock structures in the camp--and also around Mineral Wells. The original site had sen many uses: It was a P.O.W. camp for German prisoners taken during World War II; it was Texas National Guard property; and it was later given over to commercial use. An embedded star that was once on the headquarters of the parade ground of the original camp (now on the propery of Mineral Wells High School) is still visited by those who were stationed there--and by those World War II prisoners who were interned in Mineral Wells. The Texas Historical Commission recognizes its significance with a marker. The "new" Camp Wolters was located farther east in 1941. It has also had many uses: The U.S. Army IRTC; (Infantry Replacement Training Center) in World War II; Wolters Air Force Base in the early 1950's. It was returned to the army in 1956, and re-named Fort Wolters in 1963. It was the U.S. Army Primary Helicopter School (USAPHS)during the Vietnam War in 1966. The entrance to the original Camp Wolters was constructed of native sandstone with red-clay-tile roofs. Part of the property was distributed to Mineral Wells and Weatherford after Fort Wolters was decommissioned following the Vietnam War. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38085/
Entrance to Camp Wolters; Kitchens & Mess Halls
A legend on the bottom of the photograph clearly reads: Left: Top, Entrance to Camp Wolters. Bottom, Kitchens and Mess Halls, Camp Wolters." It shows seven rock-faced buildings with a curb in front of them. Ash cans, and trash repositories--also rock-faced--are visible on left. Five men--unidentified--stand around. The date of the photograph has not been preserved, but Camp Wolters was the World War I predecessor of the later Fort Wolters. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39201/
Ex- Confederates, Mineral Wells Camp No. 772
No information is available about this photograph, other than inscription "Ex. Confederates Min. Wells Camp no. 772" written in white or silver ink. There are twenty-three men in the picture (16 standing, 7 kneeling) apparently taken on NE 1st Street, beside the rock-constructed Yeager Drug Store. The apparent ages of the men indicates they were probably surviving veterans of the Civil War, either living in Mineral Wells or attending a convention here. The photograph is mounted on cardboard. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20229/
[Excavation for the Baker]
Excavation work and clearing of the two blocks in downtown Mineral Wells for the Baker Hotel is shown here. In the background is the Dr. Thompson home, the old First Methodist church and parsonage. The parsonage was moved to the corner of SE 3rd Street & SE 5th Avenue. The filling station in the foreground was located where Murray's Grill parking lot once was [ca. 1950]. The Piedmont Hotel was across the street (NE 1st Avenue.) where the Baker Hotel garage building is now [2009]located. The work has just begun clearing the lots. The tower on top of East Mountain is barely visible above the welcome sign that was erected there in 1925. This photograph comes from the Young collection. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39166/
Exchange Hotel
[The] Exchange Hotel (also known as [The]Plateau in 1909, and later as the Hospital) was built on he site of the Cliff House, which was destroyed by fire. The house to the right was built in 1896 by Dr. A. W. Thompson as a wedding present for his second wife. The Mineral Wells Post Office was built on the vacant lot at the left of the hotel in 1912. The Mineral Wells City Directory of 1924 listed the former Exchange/Plateau building as the Mineral Wells Sanatorium. Dr. A.W. Thompson was still living in the house to the right at the time. The Hotel/Hospital was finally demolished. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16183/
[ F. Troop 124th Cavalry ]
Shown here is a picture of the F Troop, 124th Cavalry, taken on the steps of the Baker Hotel at one of their annual meetings in the 1960's. From left to right 1st row: J. Harrington, P. Henson, M. Yell, J. Scott, L. Holt, J. Cooper, W. McQueary, W. Holt, G. Rankin, 2nd row: F. Crow, J. Warner, T. Owens, L. Knight, A. Lee, R. Huddleston, H. Warren, C. Baker, L. Hudspeth, T. Newton, T. J. Newton, 3rd row: G. Hines, E. Warren, O. Keller, N. Yates, J. Kincaid, R. Bell, H. Rochelle, D. McMinn, G. Lee, T. Blanton, 4th row: J. Harrington, V. Poe, N. Stockstill, A. Hudspeth, H. Blanton, N. Kimbrough, W. Bell, 5th row: C. Kirby, J. Harrison, O. Martin, S. Whatley, J. Dews, Dr. J. Huey. F Troop served with distinction in the China-Burma-India Theater of war in World War II. England's Lord Mountbatten, Commander of the C-B-I Theater, dedicated a monument to F Troop in Mineral Wells, October 14, 1972. The monument still stands on the south side of the 500 block of SE 1st Street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25071/
Facts about the U. S. Army Replacement Center, Mineral Wells, Texas
This item appears to be about the size of a bookmark. It contains a list of facts and statistics about the facilities and personnel at Camp Wolters in Mineral Wells, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46562/
The Fair Grounds and Race Track, Mineral Wells, Texas
Shown here is a picture of a dirt horse-race track and fair grounds,located southeast of town. It is not known if thoroughbred horses raced, but sulkies are known to have raced here. This course was the first of its kind in Mineral Wells. Another track was constructed at Elmhurst Park, in the southeast part of town, after this one was torn down. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20364/
The Fairfield Hotel
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60885/
Fairfield Inn
The Fairfield Inn, built by Col. Walter H. Boykin around the turn of the twentieth century, was a very popular rooming and boarding house in the early days of Mineral Wells. It was located at 814 North Oak Street, across Oak Street and one block north of the contemporary Hexagon Hotel. Part of the retaining wall shown in the picture still exists. Mr. Boykin built his home at 1501 SE 4th Avenue. The home was later sold to William Whipple Johnson, who operated the Rock Creek coal mines in eastern Parker County around 1910. Mr. Johnson, with his brother Harvey, had previously opened the coal mines at Thurber on the Palo Pinto/Erath county line in 1908. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16206/
Fairfield Inn, Mineral Wells, Tex
Shown here is a an extensively damaged and repaired postcard of the Fairfield Inn. The inn, built by Colonel Walter H. Boykin around the turn of the twentieth century, was located at 814 N. Oak Avenue and faced west. The postcard is addressed to A. J. Ryder, Mallory Docks, Galveston, Texas. The postmark it bears dates to 1911. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20341/
Famous Mineral Water
The Famous Water Company, founded by Ed Dismuke (still located at 215 NW 6th Street) has been restored, and still [2007] sells mineral water. The large concrete bottle depicts the original shape of the container of the product sold. Dismuke also established a plant on the east bank of Lake Pinto, west of Mineral Wells, to manufacture his "PRONTO-LAX" Crystals. He organized the Mineral Wells Lakewood Scenic Railway in partnership with local banker Cicero Smith, whose gasoline-powered "Dinky Cars" operated quarter-hourly between Lake Pinto and Mineral Wells from 1905 to 1909. The Famous Water Company currently sells three grades of water: Regular, full-strength mineral water; deep (400 ft.) well water; and deep-well water that has been ionized and filtered by reverse osmosis. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24958/
Famous Mineral Water "At the Sign on of the Old Well"
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39260/
The Famous Water Pavilion--Damron Hotel
The Famous Water Wells maintained a pavilion in the lobby of the Damron Hotel, where guests could partake of mineral water. This hotel was located on the corner of W. Hubbard Street and SW 1st Street. It burned down in 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20310/
Famous Well
This picture is taken from a series of 17 (4X4) negatives that were enclosed in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma: 73069), postmarked Aug. 4, 1975, and addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography. The photographs were taken January 11, 1919. Also written on the envelope were some telephone numbers and the following: "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield)." The rock building housing the original well was located on Lake Pinto, across West Mountain from the City of Mineral Wells. Mineral water was piped to the Famous drinking pavilion. The Famous Water Company is still [2007] in operation at 215 NW 6th Street, vending "crazy" mineral water, deep-well water, and drinking water filtered by reverse-osmosis. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20381/
[A Farm House]
A color photograph of a farmhouse in Palo Pinto County is illustrated here. The exact date of the picture is unknown. This one was found among other photographs taken in Thurber, so the locale shown may have been found there. Please note the red soil, which characteristically forms over limestone. Its typical of the county. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38068/
[Farmer's Market at the Dancing Pavilion at Elmhurst Park]
This photograph, printed in A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS IN Mineral Wells..." on page 88, illustrates a display of fruit jars at the Mineral Wells Fair, held at the Dancing Pavilion at Elmhurst Park. Canned fruits and vegetables were customarily entered in Palo Pinto County's annual fall harvest fair. Elmhurst Park hosted the fair, among other popular events during its heyday. The popularity of personal automobile transportation made transit by street car unprofitable by 1913, and the park closed shortly after the street cars were discontinued. The City of Mineral Wells' water treatment facilities are now located in the southwest part of town, on the former Elmhurst Park property. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29833/
[The Ferris Anderson Home]
This picture is may be found on page 183 of the book "Time Was..." Second Edition by A. F. Weaver. His caption reads, "Ferris Anderson home with Anderson on the left family group. Home is located off SE 25th Avenue. The American Legion Post 75 was named after Ferris Anderson." Anderson was a war casualty in World War I. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20265/
The Fiftieth Reunion of the Graduating Class of 1934
This picture reproduces a newspaper clipping that reports the fiftieth reunion of the 1934 class from Mineral Wells High School. It was published in the Mineral Wells Index on June 28, 1984. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16344/
The Final page of the Minutes of the Bicentennial Committee, 1975
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60938/
[The Fire at the Sangcura-Sprudel Well Building]
The Sangcura-Sprudel Well, located at 800 NW 2nd Avenue, was built around 1900. The building was later moved to 314 NW 5th Street, and the porches were enclosed. It was then re-modeled into a rooming house. The building burned down on December 5, 1973, five minutes before the annual Christmas Parade in Mineral Wells. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20338/
[A Fire in Mineral Wells, Texas]
This picture is probably a photograph of the fire which destroyed the Delaware Hotel (Formerly known as the St. Nicholas Hotel) on North Oak Avenue at NE 3rd Street. The open ditch in the right foreground shows that the streets were not paved, indicating that the fire occurred prior to 1914. The pump-and-ladder fire wagon used to battle the fire was drawn by two beautiful white horses named Joe and Frank. The hotel was never rebuilt. The standing building in the photograph is Mineral Wells Grain and Feed, but its location has not been confirmed. The signification of the number "6" on the picture invites conjecture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29830/
[Firing and Deflection Conversion Tables]
This document (FT 81 B3, abridged) consists of two pages, each with a separate table. The first table is a chart that shows range and elevation for firing particular mortar shells. The second page includes a chart with range and deflection (presumably for the same kind of shells), as well as notes which give additional instructions. The significance of the notation "CW 41-46 (11)" in the upper right-hand corner remains unknown. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46561/
[The First Air-Mail Service to Mineral Wells]
The first batch of airmail arrived in Mineral Wells, 1947, 6:30 pm. Individuals from left are: John Chamberlain, Manager of the Chamber of Commerce, Fred Parnell, Bill Cameron, of the Index, Fred Brown, Manager of the Baker Hotel, Mayor John Miller, an unidentified pilot, D.C. Harris, Postmaster (holding the mail bag) and R. T. Jones. The airplane in the background, a Cessna 190, was probably the one used to transport the mail. It appeared to be a cold day, as the officials are all wearing coats. (A negative accompanying this picture depicted a "Christmas rush at the old Post Office") texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20227/
The First Anniversary of the Aviation Engineer Force Activation
Troops and spectators celebrate the first anniversary of Aviation Engineer Force Activation at Wolters Air Force Base on April 10, 1952, with Colonel A.B. Campfield, the Commander of Troops; Brigadier General H.W. Ehrgott, Commanding; Colonel Philip G. Kemp, the Base Commander. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16324/
[The First Boy Scouts in Mineral Wells, 1902]
A note on back of this photograph states, "1902, 1st Boy Scouts in Mineral Wells, organized by Frank Creighton (L) met in old Sangcura Sprudel Well Pavilion." The picture was taken in front of Green's Transfer Building. This photograph possibly shows the youth division of a local lodge, probably Shriners. Please note the military-style stripes and guns. This historic photograph captures a precursor to the Boy Scout movement, that started six years later in England. It spread to America in 1910 to generate an interest in outdoor and educational activities among teen-age boys. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25062/
First Car of Shale
"First car of shale" is the legend printed on the original photograph. The car bears the marking "H.M.X. 20" on the rear. The picture probably commemorates the opening of Mineral Wells' fledgling brick manufacturing industry, as the appearance of a gentleman wearing a tie and wielding a shovel suggests a celebration of sorts. His attire shown is typical of summertime 1930's dress. The photograph bears the legend that it was restored by A.F. Weaver. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20363/
[First Christian Church]
On the back of photograph is typed: THIS PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN BY, A. F. WEAVER 1901 N. W. 6TH AVENUE MINERAL WELLS TEXAS DATE JUL 27 1964. First Christian church occupies the site of the former Gibson Well Park and Pavilion in the 700 block of NW 2nd Avenue (the address on the photograph was A.F. Weaver's home.) Some of the limestone used to build the church was donated by latter-day owners of the historic Rock Pens on Dillingham Prairie, where the first meeting of the Northwest Texas Cattle Raisers' Association was held in 1876. Oliver Loving's son, J.C. Loving, wrote a letter to northwest Texas ranchers after the meeting, inviting them to meet the following February in Graham, where the Association was organized. C.C. Slaughter, once the richest man in Texas, owned the Rock Pens at the time of the Stock Raisers' meeting. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29978/
[First Christian Church]
Typed on the back photograph is: THIS PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN BY A.F. WEAVER 1901 N. W. 6TH AVE. MINERAL WELLS, TEXAS DATE JUL 27, 1964. It is a view of the limestone church occupying the site of the former Gibson Well Park and Pavilion. Some of the rock used in this church came from owners of the historic Rock Pens on Dillingham Prairie. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29977/
[First Country Club]
Illustrated here is a picture of the first Mineral Wells Gold country club, taken about 1950. The picture shows it on the shore of a lake that was located about three miles east of Mineral Wells. Further information is,sadly,lacking. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60919/
[The First Crazy Hotel]
This picture shows the front of the first Crazy Hotel, which was destroyed by fire March 15, 1925. Built in two stages and joined together, the first (back) section was built in 1912, and the second (front) section was completed in 1914. A handwritten note on back of photograph states, "Crazy Hotel 1913. Front of Hotel Facing South Mineral Wells, Tx." This picture is included on page 15 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS...", and was probably taken before the second section of the hotel opened for business. The back of Crazy Flats (the second Crazy Water Drinking Pavilion) can be seen to the right, north of and behind the hotel in this picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29966/
[The First Crazy Hotel and Crazy Flats]
A view of the Crazy Flats and first Crazy Hotel, as seen from East Mountain. Crazy Flats, at the right middle of the picture, was the second Crazy Drinking Pavilion--also with Rooms for Rent--was built in 1909. One feature of the Flats was "Peacock Alley", where the men gathered on Sundays to watch the ladies parade and show off the latest fashions in female gear. The first Crazy Hotel is to the left rear of the Flats; the first section of the Hotel, on the right, was built in 1912, and the second section, on the left, to its left, was built in 1914 and connected to the first with a common lobby. The Crazy Bath house adjoined Crazy Flats on the left, and a drugstore was located in the left corner of the Bath house building. A fire, starting in the drugstore on March 15, 1925, burned the entire block, sparing only the small building housing the first Crazy Pavilion (the right rear of the Flats.) The current (second) Crazy Hotel opened in 1927, and replaced all of the former businesses in this block. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29449/
[The First Mayor of Incorporated Mineral Wells]
Judge J. A. Lynch bought eighty acres, laid out the city of Mineral Wells, and was its first self-appointed Mayor. The city itself incorporated in 1882, and Jim Laverty became the first Mayor of the newly-incorporated Mineral Wells. Mineral Wells adopted a change of charter in 1894; and a new corporation was formed, which elected G. C. Green the first Mayor of this new corporation. This picture shows Jim Laverty and his dog in 1882. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20251/
[The First Motorcycle in Mineral Wells]
A caption, taken from "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver, on page 116 states: "Pictured in 1908 is Frank Richards, owner of the first motorcycle bought in Mineral Wells. D. C. Harris owned the second motorcycle." Frank Richards was the manager of the Star Well during Mineral Wells' heyday as a popular health spa resort, and the boy on the motorbike with him has been identified as his son, Robert Frank Richards. D. C. Harris was the postmaster, and served as Mayor of the city at one time. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38072/
First National Bank
The first National Bank, at the SE corner of Oak Avenue and Hubbard Street in Mineral Wells, was originally located in the Oxford Hotel. The Lynch Building and Plaza were built on the site of the hotel, commemorating the location of the discovery of mineral water with "miracle healing powers" by a well drilled here by James A. Lynch in 1879, after the Oxford burned in 1983. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20423/
[The First National Bank]
The First National Bank was organized about 1900 by Cicero Smith. It was located on the corner of Mesquite & Throckmorton Streets (Now, [2013] Southeast 1st Avenue and Northeast 1st Streets). The Index Printing Company is visible in the rear of the building. Fourteen men (and no women) are shown around the building, all dressed in three-piece suits--including the two lounging on the steps of the Index. The picture is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 146. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39207/
[First National Bank]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60921/
[The First Presbyterian Church]
Shown here is the south side of the third First Presbyterian Church building, at 300 NW 4th Ave., and the second one at this site. Due to structural damage to the foundation, the building was torn down during the 1980's and replaced with the fourth First Presbyterian Church building - the third at this location. The building reflects an eclectic architecture, principally in Neo-classic style. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25007/
[First Presbyterian Church - 1 of 13: Front View]
This photograph is the first in a series of pictures of architectural details that was taken prior to demolition of the Presbyterian church of Mineral Wells. The first church in Mineral Wells built by the Presbyterians in 1883 was located at the southwest corner of what is now the Crazy Hotel block. The early church served both the Presbyterian and Baptist Churches, and was sold to the Baptist congregation. The First Presbyterian Church was built at 300 NW 4th Avenue in 1896, and burned in 1908 This domed structure replaced it. This picture shows the front entrance to the Sanctuary of this second First Presbyterian Church in Mineral Wells, Texas, built in 1909, at this location. This picturesque building survived the disastrous fire of July 4, 1914, that destroyed the two-by-three city block area surrounding it. The building suffered serious structural deterioration to its foundation, and was replaced in the the 1980's by a more modern structure. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25022/
[First Presbyterian Church - 2 of 13: SW Corner]
This picture is the second in a series about the First Presbyterian Church, showing the juncture of the south side of the building and the main entrance, which was at the southwest corner of the building (left in the photograph.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25015/
[First Presbyterian Church - 3 of 13: Front Entrance and Dome]
This photograph is the fourth in a series of pictures, showing architectural details of the First Presbyterian Church. This picture shows the dome over the Sanctuary. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25032/
[First Presbyterian Church - 4 of 13: Front Entrance and Dome]
This photograph is the fifth in a series of pictures of the First Presbyterian Church of Mineral Wells, Texas. This picture shows the front entrance, which was at the southwest corner of the church and the dome. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25035/