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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 Decade: 1900-1909
A July Crowd
This photograph,labeled "A July Crowd", shows a ladies' gathering about 1920. The photograph shows what is possibly a tea party or a ladies' club meeting. Some of the ladies shown were members of prominent Mineral Wells families. Identified in a typed note - and graph - accompanying the photograph are: (starting at back left) the 4th lady is Mrs. D. G. Galbraith [wife of the owner of the Hexagon House], the 8th is Mrs. E. F. Yeager [wife of Dr. E.F. Yeager, Pharmacist/ Owner of the Lion Drug Store), 16th is Mrs. J.H. McCracken [wife Dr. J.H. McCracken, president of the Texas Medical Association], 17th may be Mrs. Raines (Mrs. McCracken's mother); (middle row, starting in front of Mrs. Yeager) the second from left is Mrs. Dr. Beeler; (first row from left) the 3rd lady may be Mrs. Coon, the 6th lady is Mrs. Paul Bock, the 8th is Mrs. Reba Williams. The children in front are Langdon Bock on the left and Elizabeth Galbraith on the right. There were forty people in total. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20253/
[A LakeWood Park Scenic Railway, Dinky Car "Esther"]
This photograph shows the "Dinkey Car", Esther, that operated on The Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway to Lake Pinto from 1905 to 1907, at which time the lines were removed. The background indicates the picture was taken near Lake Pinto. This "Dinky Car" was one of two named "Esther" and "Susie" after local banker Cicero Smith's daughters. Banker Smith and Ed Dismuke, owner of The Famous Water Company, built the Scenic Railway. These little cars, powered by gasoline engines, ran every 15 minutes from Mineral Wells, around West Mountain, to Lake Pinto. A larger version, called the "Ben Hur", was added in 1907. Round trip cost 15 cents, and the cars ran on their own steel rails from 1905 to 1909. The Scenic Railway operation to Lake Pinto differed significantly from the trolley and tracks of the Mineral Wells Electric System. The trolley company served the City and ran some two miles southwest to Elmhurst Park and Lake between 1906 and 1907. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20397/
Lithia Well
The Lithia Well drinking pavilion was located on the southwest corner of the Crazy block at 400 NW 1st Avenue. The roof of the second Crazy Well drinking pavilion can be seen to the left of the Lithia. The Mineral Wells Library maintained its second location in this pavilion. The First Crazy Hotel was built on this location in 1914, but burned in 1925. The rebuilt and expanded Crazy Hotel (Now [2008] a retirement home) replaced the burned hostelry in 1927. See also the following picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24953/
Lithia Wells
The Lithia Wells and Drinking Pavilion was located on the southwest corner of the "Crazy Block." (400 NW 1st Avenue, the current [2008]location of the Crazy Retirement Home). The second Crazy Well Pavilion is the large building the upper left of the photograph. Note the three burros next to the horse. Riding burros up a trail on East Mountain was a popular tourist pastime, in addition to drinking and bathing in the mineral waters. The Mineral Wells Public Library was located in the Lithia Pavilion at one time. See also the preceding picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24959/
Looking south on Mesquite Street
A street scene, identified as Mesquite Street (now NE 1st Avenue)and looking south, taken at the turn of the twentieth century, shows businesses that antedate the coming of the automobile. On the right, in the middle of the picture, the Yeager Building is shown with a stone lion mounted on its roof. Many historians now refer to this building as the Lion Drug Store. However, current Yeager descendants now living in Mineral Wells do not remember the store ever being named anything but The Yeager Drug Store. The third building on the left (with the spire on top) was the Star Well whose manager, Frank Richards was an active participant in Mineral Wells' early business and social activities. At the end of the street is Mineral Wells depot built in 1902. Absence of the "Dinky Car" tracks in the middle of the street indicates that the picture was taken prior to the building of the Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway in 1905. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16279/
Lower End of Mesquite St.
A view of Mesquite Street (in 2008: NE 1st Avenue), taken in 1910, and looking south-east. The scene shows horse-drawn wagons loaded with cotton bales. Electrical lines are visible. The building at the northeast corner of East Hubbard Street and South Mesquite Street is the D.M. Howard Block. D. M Howard was the first of five Howard brothers to come to Mineral Wells and establish businesses. There was a Dry Goods store on the left end of the building, a millinery shop above it, and a grocery store was in the building to the right. Later the J.M. Belcher Furniture occupied the building; and still later, R&W Furniture. Demolition of the building began March 17 of 1975 to make room for the Savings and Loan Building and a parking lot. The First State Bank now [2007] occupies this entire block. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16293/
[A Mayor's Granddaughter on a Donkey]
A copy of this photograph may be found in A. F. Weaver's, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", First Edition, on page 151. The caption reads, "Mary Berta Perry, granddaughter of Mayor Laverty, 1908." Jim Laverty was the first City Marshall of Mineral Wells. He was elected mayor when the City was first incorporated in 1882. The first incorporation was defeated by vote in 1894, and Mineral Wells was reincorporated with G.C. Green as the first elected mayor. This picture was the style of souvenir photograph which local photographer J. C. McClure, first owner of the donkeys, took on an East Mountain path frequented by visitors. Mr. McClure was killed while riding a wild stallion on Oak Avenue. J. L. Young and his wife later owned the photography studio and the donkeys. They later built a log cabin as a scenic backdrop at a photograph stop where the donkey trail crossed a footpath up West Mountain. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24996/
Mineral Wells (1900)
This article and photograph from the Weaver Collection appeared in the Mineral Wells Index in the late 1960's--or possibly the early 1970's. The newspaper attributes the photograph to the "Courtesy of Tom Green," and the research to "Bill Cameron." The article states: "This is the way Mineral Wells looked at the turn of the [twentieth] Century. The Scott Livery Stable, foreground, is occupies the area the Whatley Motor Company does today. Across the street at left was the two-story Holmes Hotel. The barn in the corner, in the center of picture, was the T.J. Green Transfer Company. Mat Birdwell, who purchased horses for the government, had his headquarters in the Green barn. Other spots include the Frost Lumber Yard, next to the Green barn; [the] old Baptist Church steeples, top left; [the] Presbyterian Church, top right, that burned 60 years ago." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20390/
[A Mineral Wells Advertisement]
A 1906 seasonal advertisement, compliments Central Texas Realty Association, depicts a young lady (An Art Nouveau goddess?) half-kneeling before a frame that suggests stained glass. She is holding a water jug, from which pours a stream of healing elixir that splashes into the lowermost center of the brochure. Decorative scrolls reminiscent of wrought iron sculpture decorate the advertisement. Stars, both in the advertisement and on the lady's tiara, hint that Mineral Wells is the City of Light. What appears to be a coffee stain shows at the upper left. Someone has penciled "1905" in the upper right corner. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29836/
[The Mineral Wells Bottling Works]
A number of the early mineral water wells bottled their product and sold it nationwide for its reputed health benefits. The name of this particular well, associated with this turn-of-the-20th-century endeavor, is not identified. It may well have been the inventor of the bottled water industry. This photograph shows what has been tentatively identified as a threshing machine, driven by a steam-powered tractor, parked outside the plant. This bottling plant also produced "Country Red" and "Cream soda" in 1906. J.L. Tipton is shown, fourth from the left. The other men remain unidentified. The photograph dates from 1912. This bottling company also bottled "Country Red" and "Cream soda" in 1912. J.L. Tipton is shown, fourth from the left. The other men remain unidentified. Later development of a crystallizing process eliminated the substantial cost of shipping water, and adversely affected the bottled water industry. The concentrated crystals greatly expanded the distribution of the beneficial minerals inherent in the water, and created an industry of its own. However, it led to legal problems occasioned by the limited supply of crystals, and attempts to satisfy a voracious market. What appears to be a scar across the photograph indicates that the original picture was probably damaged, and was repaired by Mr. Weaver for the making of a duplicate photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38079/
[A Mineral Wells Electric System Trolley Car]
A "Major" Beardsley, a Canadian who fought for Maine in the Civil War, was granted a franchise to construct a railway street system in 1906. He was also granted a 99-year franchise for the generation and sale of electricity in Mineral Wells. He also bought about 600 acres of land, and established three additions: Lowe Place addition, Lawn Place, Lawn Terrace, and Elmhurst Park, which came to sport a dance pavilion and a Casino. The panic of 1907 brought an end to the enterprise. Beardsley's trustee, a Mr. W.B. Smith,and the City of Mineral Wells, sued Beardsley's creditors. A judgment awarded Smith the sum of $15,000, and gave the City of Mineral Wells some sixty acres--which included Elmhurst Park. The legal battle continued beyond 1917, when the decision was reversed and remanded by the Court of Civil appeals for Texas. Number 23 trolley car is illustrated here. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20361/
[Mineral Wells Firemen , about 1907]
An undated, hand-written note, in what appears to be Mr. Weaver's writing, and attached to the print says that it is "Sam Smith's Picture." In another person's handwriting, a second note states, "MW [Mineral Wells] firemen at McLendon and Burch Feed Store--where Brookshire Furniture store now is (213 SE 1st Street). Burned out between 1907 and 1915. Front Row: Guy Croft, Henry Russell, J W (Buck) Thomas, Jube Warren, Holland Cogdell, Bill Deck (mask on), Bob Bozzell, Oscar Bish -Chief- , John Moore. Top Row - John Gill, Ben McGowen, D.E. Odell, Henry Briley, Arthur Ford, Arthur Howard, C.H. Alexander, Henry Hester, J.W. Birdwell, Ernest Wallace, Reginald Cogdell (driver). 18 are known to be deceased." Then, in Mr. Weaver's handwriting again, "All but three deceased." There is another note subtracting 1907 from 1973, with 66 as the result. The photograph possibly dates from 1907, and Mr. Weaver's notes to 1973. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24983/
[Mineral Wells' First Public School Erected in 1884]
This rock structure is now [2008] a museum dedicated to the preservation of the history of the city. There was some construction around the school at the time of this photograph, probably due to the building of Mineral Wells' first high school, the West Ward School, on the same lot, next door to and north of the little Rock School in 1902. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25056/
A Mineral Wells Public Schools Certificate of Promotion
A certificate of Promotion from Mineral Wells Public Schools, certifying that Floy Stone has completed the 8th grade in May 1903 is shown here. It is signed by B. C. Osborn. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16360/
Mineral Wells School Texas (Architectural Drawing?)
This clipping had been mounted in a scrapbook, and the legible portion of the caption says, "Mineral Wells School, Texas." It appears to be a reproduction of a greatly reduced architectural drawing. The building pictured here has been shown to be the Mineral Wells College, under the direction of Professor John McCracken. An edition of the "Weatherford Democrat" of September 12, 1895 reports that the school has had "...six years of phenomenal success, and now finds larger quarters necessary. The beautiful building soon to adorn the campus will be a testimonial from the people as to the excellent work accomplished by Prof. McCracken and his competent faculty, as well as a guarantee to prospectors that their children will be as thoroughly instructed as in larger cities." Although the school touts itself as a "College", the modern reader is more likely to regard it as a private boarding school. The advertisement in the "Weatherford Democrat" shows the building, here, which may be the same picture. Its caption announces that the Mineral Wells College offers "Classical, Scientific, English, Music, Elocution, and Art Courses." Board is given (in 1895) at "$10.00 per month"; Tuition is listed as "$1,60 to $4.10." The modern reader [in 2014] is permitted to contemplate these prices, without further comment. The style of the building is Romanesque, which in 1895, represented the acme of this style for public (and apparently, semi-public) buildings, as well). It was considered, in its time, an expensive style of architecture (it was solid masonry). Professor McCracken's choice of this style of building may only be described as ambitious. At the present time [2014], no building of this description appears to be extant in Mineral Wells. It is conjectured that, for reasons unknown, the building was never built. The fate of the "College" remains unknown. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25053/
Mosquito Street, Looking North, Mineral Wells, Texas
Shown here is a postcard, reading "Mosquito Street(actually Mesquite Street),Looking North, Mineral Wells, Texas." Please note the Chautauqua Theater (1905-1912) at the end of the street. This picture was taken before street car tracks were installed in 1907. Also note the the absence of cars on the street--only horses and buggies. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20443/
[The Norwood Hospital]
A photograph of the Norwood Hospital during its completion. Note the "Parry and Spicer Architects" sign and the "Goodrum, Murphy and Croft Contractors" sign. Dr. Norwood was the first Osteopathic doctor to set up business in Mineral Wells. He departed this life at the age of 82 in 1953. The building was donated to the Mineral Wells Historic Foundation. Plans were announced to convert the clinic to a Bed and Breakfast facility, but no progress towards such a conversion has been made to date [2007]. The legend "1863" appears on the photograph, but it is not known what it signifies. It cannot possibly be the date of the building--or of its photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20235/
Old Elmhurst Park , Allen & Charles,1907
Two people are shown standing on the wooden bridge at Elmhust Park, Mineral Wells, in 1907. A holograph inscription on the photograph that reads "Old Elmhurst Park, Allen & Charles, 1907", probably refers to the man and boy in the picture. Elmhurst Park, a very popular recreation area during its heyday, was located in southwest Mineral Wells at the end of the streetcar line. Patrons walked from the streetcar (in the background) across the wooden bridge to the Casino and other attractions. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16309/
Palo Pinto County Star. (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 25, No. 16, Ed. 1 Friday, November 9, 1900
A weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417298/
[A Post Card of a Football Team]
This postcard, taken around 1909, features the Mineral Wells High School football team. Please note the guards, hanging around their necks, that were used to protect the noses of the players. Those guards were held in place by means of a strap that went around the head, and were further kept in place by clenching the teeth on a rubber bit on the inside of the guard. The back of the card lists the players' names from top left: 1) Jessie Turner, 2) Tulane Smith, 3) J.C. Hayes, 4) Faburt Holmes , 5) George Oliver, 6) Blake Turner, 7) Bertram Hedrich, 8) Lamar McNew, and 9) Mr. Dinsmore. Front row 10) Carodine Hootin 11) Gordon Whatley, 12) Vernon Durham, 13) Fred McClurhin, 14) Achie Holdrige, 15) Chester Baughn, and 16) Hugh Brewster. Jess Turner(1) was later a member of Mineral Wells' only undefeated team in 1912. C.N. Turner, father of teammates Jess(1) and Blake Turner(6), purchased one of the early telephone companies in Palo Pinto County. He operated it with his sons as a family business. Jess Turner became a pioneer in the telephone business, and purchased the other family interests in 1924 to become sole owner of the family enterprise. His son, Jess Turner, Jr., operated the telephone company following World war II, relinquishing his position in October of 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25054/
Presbyterian Church of Mineral Wells
Written on the back of the photograph is: "Presbyterian Church & Manse N.W. 4th Ave. & [NW]2nd St. Built 1896, Burned 1908" This was the first Presbyterian Church of Mineral Wells. It was replaced, after it burned in 1908, at the same location the next year by a unique domed church that endured for some seventy years. Deterioration of the foundation of the second church building dictated its prudent replacement by a third building at this same location in the early 1980's. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29454/
[R.L. Polk & Co.'s Mineral Wells City Directory, 1909]
The city directory for Mineral Wells, 1909, embracing a complete alphabetical list of business firms and private citizens; a directory of city and county officials, churches, public and private schools, banks, asylums, hospitals, commercial bodies, secret societies, street and avenue guide, etc. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20207/
Sangcura Sprudel Wells
The Sangcura Sprudel Wells. On back of photograph is written: "Located at 800 N.W. 2nd Avenue." The building was later moved to 314 NW 5th Street. The porches were enclosed and it was turned into a rooming house. The building burned down in 1973. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29821/
Sangcura Sprudel Wells
The Sangcura-Sprudel Wells Drinking Pavilion was originally located at 800 NW Second Avenue. The building was later moved to 314 NW 5th Street, the porches enclosed, and it was converted into a rooming house. The Crazy Water bottling plant was built on this site in 1919. The rooming house that was the former Sangcura-Sprudel drinking Pavilion burned on December 5, 1973, just five minutes before Mineral Wells' annual Christmas Parade was scheduled to start. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24970/
[The Second Crazy Water Well Drinking Pavilion]
The small building seen at the right of this picture was the First Crazy Well Drinking Pavilion. The large structure in the center of the picture is an early view of the second Pavilion, which was built in 1900. This picture was taken before its first two floors were enclosed. The Carlsbad pavilion, which was built around 1895 (across NW 1st Avenue and west of the Crazy) also appears in several pictures of the area around this time. Its absence in this photograph is probably the result of a combination of perspective, angle of picture, and depth-of-view of the camera. The Second Pavilion (shown in this photograph) was replaced in 1909 by the Crazy Flats, which burned in the fire of 1925. The current Crazy Hotel opened in 1927, and occupies the entire city block. It is now [2003] a retirement home. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29962/
Souvenir...Mineral Wells Volunteer Fire Department
Shown here is the cover of a souvenir booklet about the Mineral Wells, Texas, Volunteer Fire Department,published in 1906. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth21927/
[A Souvenir Photograph of a Donkey Ride up East Mountain]
Entertainment for the many visitors to Mineral Wells around the turn of the twentieth century was provided, in part, by donkey rides up a trail to the top of East Mountain. The donkey trail crossed a 1,000-step staircase, built in 1905, to the top of the mountain about half-way up. Photographers, first J.C. McClure and then J.L. Young, took souvenir photographs of the visitors at this crossing. This photograph of the Belcher family was a taken by J. D. McClure. Mr. John M. Belcher stands on the right and his son, John E. Belcher sits on a donkey at the left of the picture, with his mother standing beside him. The clothing suggests that the picture was taken in the early 1900's. The legend "19EE" in the lower left-hand part of the picture invites speculation concerning its significance. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25057/
[The St. Nicholas Hotel]
A group of men stand in front of the St. Nicholas Hotel. A colophon at the lower right designates this picture as a photographic souvenir from Minerals Wells, taken by Dan W. Evans. The building had a varied history. It was first (in 1904) an unnamed two-and-one-half-story sanitarium, then re-named the St. Nicholas Hotel, and then later it became the Delaware Hotel. It was located at N. Oak and NE 3rd Street. The building was eventually consumed by fire on October of 1907. The back of photograph has a T and P Railway logotype and this information about the Jericho Fine Photo Company: "Mountain and Donkey Groups, View Souvenirs and Scenery of Min-Wells, Kodak Supplies and Finishing, Button and Stamp Photos a Specialty. Dan W. Evans Prop. Min Wells, Tex." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16357/
Texas Carlsbad Water
This photograph illustrates the Texas Carlsbad Well at Mineral Wells, Texas, one of the early drinking pavilions in the "City built on water." It was located at 415 NW 1st Avenue, directly across the street west of the first Crazy Well drinking pavilion. Shown here is an early picture of the Carlsbad, as later views show slight additions and alterations in response to competition among drinking pavilions for business. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24986/
Texas Carlsbad Well
The Texas Carlsbad Well, 415 N.W. 1st Avenue is illustrated, this picture taken about around 1908. This first Carlsbad pavilion was directly across N.W. 1st Avenue, west of the second Crazy well pavilion. The Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway ran down N.W. 1st Avenue between the two pavilions from 1905 to 1909 providing service each 1/4 hour to Lake Pinto. The "Ben Hur" gasoline-powered motor cars were the last and largest of the "Dinky Cars" in service on the tracks that are visible in this picture. This picture can be found on page 82 of A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS ... ", first edition. A second pavilion, a modern brick structure, was added in 1909 and the original wooden building was later removed. The second pavilion was taken over by the Crazy Hotel for its Laundry and Dry Cleaning during World War II. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24969/
Texas Carlsbad Well [1 of 3: People on Porch]
The Texas Carlsbad Well was located at 415 NW 1st Avenue, directly across the street west of the first Crazy Well drinking pavilion. This picture appears to be a promotional advertisement for the pavilion. The name of the well was lettered at the top of the building under the large eaves of the roof. The pavilion was replaced with a brick building, the "New Carlsbad Well' around 1909. Stained glass windows were added to the new pavilion showing a picture of Ponce de Leon and his "Fountain of Youth" mineral water. This picture has been cropped, and the second picture of this image shows more of the outer detail. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24979/
Texas Carlsbad Well [ 2 of 3: People on Porch]
An early picture of the Texas Carlsbad Drinking Pavilion, located at 415 NW 1st Avenue. It stood across the street west of the Crazy Well and its first Crazy Drinking Pavilion. The large, two story Second Crazy Pavilion, built adjacent, and to the south of the first one, faced west toward the Carlsbad. The Carlsbad had been replaced by a brick structure by 1909. Stained glass windows were later added to the building that depicted Ponce de Leon and his "Fountain of Youth" mineral water that "Makes a man love HIS wife. "Makes a wife love HER husband, "Robs the divorce court of its business, "Takes the temper out of red-headed people, "Puts ginger into ginks and pepper into plodders." This is the second picture of this image. The first one has been cropped, and does not show the outer parts of the picture. The third one is a slightly clearer picture. A colophon on the lower left corner reads: "Evans Photo Min Wells Tex" texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24978/
Texas Carlsbad Well [3 of 3: People on Porch]
The Texas Carlsbad Well, located at 415 NW 1st Avenue, was one of the early mineral water wells in Mineral Wells. It was located directly across the street, and west of the first Crazy Water Well drinking pavilion. The Carlsbad slogan was: "Makes a man love HIS wife, Makes a wife love HER husband, Robs the divorce court of its business, Takes the temper out of red-headed people, Puts ginger into ginks and pepper into plodders." The Carlsbad Pavilion is prominent in several pictures taken in 1908, but this structure was demolished and replaced with a brick structure in 1911. This picture is slightly cropped but it is slightly sharper in certain areas than the previous two pictures. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24990/
Texas Carlsbad Wells, Mineral Wells, Texas
Shown here is another picture of the Texas Carlsbad Wells, Mineral Wells, Texas. The Carlsbad was one of the early mineral water drinking pavilions in "the city built on water," located at 415 NW 1st Avenue, directly across the street and west of the first Crazy Well pavilion. The Carlsbad slogan was: "Makes a man love HIS wife, Makes a wife love HER husband, Robs the divorce court of its business, Takes the temper out of red-headed people, Puts ginger into ginks and pepper into plodders." The Carlsbad was on the Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway Line. Gasoline-powered trolleys, known as the "Dinky Cars", operated at 15-minute intervals between Mineral Wells and Lake Pinto from 1905 to 1909. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24987/
[A Trolley Car of the] Mineral Wells Electric System
A "Major" J. D. Beardsley (1837-1911)--a Canadian who fought for the Union in the Civil war--built an electric trolley line that ran from North Oak, south to the train depot, west to Pecan Street (NW 4th Avenue), south on Pecan Street, to the ridge in the Lowe Place Addition, west to Pollard creek, where Mr. Beardsley laid out Elmhurst Park (q.v.). A cross-line on Hubbard street ran east to Elmwood Cemetery. By the end of 1906, Beardsley owned sixteen cars, running on approximately ten miles of tracks. He attempted to obtain backing to install an interurban railway to Weatherford, from Mineral wells, but he met with no success--despite receiving national coverage for his efforts. The panic of 1907 brought an end to the enterprise. Portions of the tracks were removed near the water wells dug by Mr. Ed Dismuke (q.v., in the description field.), by a syndicate of Beardsley's creditors ,including D. T. Bomar, (who bought the railway and assorted properties at auction for $75,000) and Morgan Jones. in 1911. His extensive properties went to several of his other creditors. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20351/
Vichy Well Natatorium
An off-season picture of the Vichy Well Natatorium, located in the 600 block of North Oak Avenue, where North Oak Community Center now [2008] stands. The picture dates to around 1900. The Vichy well featured a swimming pool, which it labelled a "Natatorium." Later improvements, when the name was changed to The Standard Well, included a motion-picture theater and a pavilion for dancing. (Note the Dr. A.W. Thompson residence and the Mineral Wells Sanitarium on the right skyline.) A USO was built on this location In World War II for white servicemen at Camp Wolters. The USO building was turned over to the city at the end of the war, and became known as the North Oak Community Center. Preservation efforts are underway [in 2008] to restore the Community Center. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24968/
West Side School -- Second Grade 1907
The second grade class at West Side School in 1907 sit on the steps outside the old rock building built in 1886. The teacher is Miss Amie Hensley. Some of the names of the children are listed on the back. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16359/
[The West Ward School]
The West Ward School is shown with "Dinky Car" tracks in foreground. The picture was taken around 1909. The first Mineral Wells School with a graduating class, built in 1902, it was located just north of Little Rock School on NW 5th Avenue. Mineral Wells' first High School graduation class, consisted of four students in 1903, as evinced by a photograph in "Time Was...", page 189. It was later named "Houston School" in 1915. The West Ward School was subsequently torn down. Another school, constructed on SW 4th Avenue, was then named "Houston School." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20246/
[West Ward School]
This photograph appears to have been given to A. W. Weaver with the following information on the back of it: "Wasn't it Whittier who said 'Still stately stands the old school house, beside the babbling brook'?--well this one no longer stands. It was a firm & strong old building when they tore it down 4 years ago. I thought you would cherish this picture as a fond recollection of yours, mine & Hugh's school days & days of happy childhood, where, as we romped & played barefoot in the soft sands & green grass, we were not as yet familiar with the hidden stones & thorns that one encounters down the highway of life. "All the sheet metal contained in the top of this building including the tin roof was made & fabricated by Papa in Grandpa's store. The metal work consists of the ornamental cornice fittings, the steeples at each corner of the building, metal banisters on the roof top, pinnacles around cupolas, flag pole with large metal ball on top & all drain piping and roof ventilators. "The barren oak trees in the yard are very familiar. Far to the right, not shown in the picture were several mesquite trees, whose limbs were platted & tied in knots when they were saplings, by Grandpa Caylor. The trees grew in the fantastic shapes. All school boys were mystified at the strange shape of the trees and Grandpa was amused." The school was located at 205 NW 5th Ave. It is both interesting and amazing how much of our history is not evident in the pictures that preserve such a vital part of it. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20214/
West Ward School Mineral Wells, Texas
This photograph illustrates a view from the east of the West Ward School at the time of its completion in 1902. It was located just north of Mineral Well's first public school, the "Little Rock School", at 205 NW 5th Avenue. West Ward housed first through twelfth grades. Mineral Well's first high school graduating class (four students) graduated from here in 1905. High School classes were moved from here to the East Ward School when it was completed in 1906. Only elementary school classes were taught here at the time West Ward school was torn down, about 1930. The Lilian Peek Cottage, Texas' first free-standing Home Economics building, was built by the W.P.A. in 1937 just to the north of where the West Ward School had been located. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24946/
"Where the Famous Crystals Are Made"
This is a photograph of a building with a sign that says, "Famous Mineral Wells Crystal Plant." There is a hill, covered in trees, behind the building. Writing at the bottom of the image reads: "Where Famous Crystals Are Made." Ed Dismuke, a drugist from Waco, came to Mineral Wells for his health after his family physician told him he only had a "short time" to live. After miraculously regaining his health, which he credited to the mineral waters of his new hometown, he sold water by the drink at the Damron Hotel, later opening his own company, The Famous Water Company. He also opened The Famous Mineral Crystal Plant on the east side of Lake Pinto in partnership with local banker Cicero Smith. The two also organized The Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway with its two gasoline-powered "dinky cars" named "Esther" and "Susie" after Smith's daughters. This is a picture of the plant where Famous Crystals, labeled "Pronto Lax" were made. Dismuke had outlived the doctors who had told him he only had a short time to live when he died at the age of ninety-four. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24961/