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 [Bank of Mineral Wells]

[Bank of Mineral Wells]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: This picture shows the interior of the Bank of Mineral Wells. Collie Smith, L.E. Hamen, and someone named only "O'Neal" are shown in the cages. The bank went out of business in 1924. The building was then used by Ball Drugs, and then by Massengale's Appliances. The building was eventually torn down, to make room for a parking in the downtown area. It is featured in "Time was in Mineral Wells" on page 148.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Barber Lake]

[Barber Lake]

Date: 1900?
Creator: unknown
Description: Many property owners in early Mineral Wells had their own water wells, but the city pumped water to a small standpipe on East Mountain for distribution to the city. When the wells became insufficient to supply the city's needs, Barber Lake was built in the Barber Addition - in the northeast part of town - as Mineral Wells' first city water supply lake. Around 1905, Cicero Smith and Ed Dismuke built a dam across Pollard Creek west of the city to form Lake Pinto, the city's next water supply. Barber Lake, the City's first municipal water supply, can still be found southeast of Cullen Grimes School (built in 1920 at 1800 NE 1st. Avenue as Barber School: the name was changed to Cullen Grimes in honor of a long-time principal when it was enlarged in 1942.)
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Baseball Team]

[A Baseball Team]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: This picture shows a men's baseball team in Mineral Wells, but the identification of the team and the men are unknown. Ike Zablosky (sometimes spelled Zabronski), a Russian immigrant, arrived in America in 1906. He entered the fur-trading business in Mineral Wells, and is credited with naming the Possum Kingdom area when a customer inquired about some premium pelts. Zablosky replied that he had none at the time, but "When my boys return from the possum kingdom, I'm sure they will have some." In Mineral Wells, Zablosky operated a class C professional league baseball team (the Resorters). He became owner of the first professional baseball team in Dallas, later in life. The Chicago White Sox are known to have held their Spring Training camp in Mineral Wells in 1911, and again in a three-year stretch of 1916, 1917, and 1918. It has not been established whether the players shown in this picture are part of the Resorters or White Sox teams. The man in the background, with an apparent uniform, is shown holding an instrument whose function has not been determined.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Basketball at Elmhurst Park]

[Basketball at Elmhurst Park]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: A note on the back of the photograph identifies this venue as Elmhurst Park. The park was located on Pollard Creek, some two miles southwest of downtown Mineral Wells; and was owned by The Mineral Wells Electric System which operated a trolley from downtown to the park. (The street car company went bankrupt in 1913, and both the park and trolley ceased operations that year.) The picture appears to be a tip-off to begin a period of play in a men's basketball game. Both men's and women's basketball games were held at the park when it was in operation (from 1907 to 1913).
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Basketball Game at Elmhurst Park]

[A Basketball Game at Elmhurst Park]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: Games at Elmhurst Park in 1910 included girls' basketball. The players here are wearing the typical basketball uniforms of "genteel ladies" of the day. Girls and ladies played on half of a normal basketball court with both teams shooting at the same basket. The game was restarted with a "jump ball" after each goal or foul (read: "Rule infraction").
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Bathing Beauties]

[Bathing Beauties]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: Three young women lounge at the "old" Mineral Wells City Pool. The woman on the right was Jill Hickey, Mineral Wells High School graduate of 1966, later Jill Hickey Moore of Stafford, Texas. This photograph, judging by the women's hair-do's, appears to have been taken in the 1960's.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
The "Ben Hur"

The "Ben Hur"

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The "Ben Hur" motor car is shown on Mesquite Street (the 200 block of NE 1st Avenue), Mineral Wells, Texas. This new and larger gasoline-powered car joined two "Dinky Cars" (Esther and Susie--named for the daughters of the railroad's co-owner, banker Cicero Smith) on the Mineral Wells Lakewood Park and Scenic Railway in 1908. The railway ceased operation in 1909, a year after the larger car was added to the fleet. Mineral Wells was probably one of the few cities in the United States which had gasoline-powered street cars. One of the boys shown standing beside it is Mr. Whatley of automobile fame. This photograph is shown on page 74 of "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", Second Edition. The Scenic Railway, on which the "Dinky Cars" operated, was owned by banker Cicero Smith; and Ed Dismuke, owner of the Famous Water Company. It carried passengers every quarter-hour from Mineral Wells around the south flank of West Mountain to the recreation area of Lake Pinto. A 'round trip fare was fifteen cents. Dismuke's Famous Mineral Water wells were located around Lake Pinto, and water was pumped over the mountain to the Famous Water Company and its drinking pavilion. The building on ...
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The Bethesda Bath House

The Bethesda Bath House

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The Bethesda Bath House was formerly located 406 N. Oak, with the top of the front of Chautauqua to the northeast of the bath house, visible over the top of the bath house roof's gable at the left side of the building. The Bethesda Bath House apparently contained the office of Dr. G. W. Hubbard. Bathing in the mineral waters was considered a health treatment, and was recommended by local doctors. There is a structure seen behind the bath house in the lower right quadrant of the photograph. This may have been the doctor's residence.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Bicentennial Parade in Mineral Wells]

[The Bicentennial Parade in Mineral Wells]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The Mineral Wells Heritage Association sponsored a float in the April 4, 1976 "Time Was" Bicentennial Parade (celebrating the United States Bicentennial). The float commemorates both the publishing of A. F. Weaver's photographic history, "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells...", which was published co-incident with the conversion of the "Little Rock Schoolhouse" into a museum, and restoration of the building itself. The ninety-member Mineral Wells Heritage Association was formed to preserve Mineral Wells' first (1884) public school. Mr. Weaver was a director and Charter Member of the Heritage Association, and served as its first President. He was also chairman of the Palo Pinto County Bi-centennial Committee. The parade is pictured going south on Oak Avenue (US Highway 281) at the corner of Hubbard Street (US Highway 180). Jeep's "The Thing" automobile is pulling the float.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Bicentennial Parade in Mineral Wells]

[The Bicentennial Parade in Mineral Wells]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The Rotary Club featured a float during "Time Was" Bicentennial (celebrating the United States Bi-Centennial) parade in downtown Mineral Wells, on April 4, 1976. It is moving south on Oak Avenue at the intersection of Oak and Hubbard Streets. Riders on the float depict "flappers" and a golfer of the "Roaring Twenties", dancing to jazz music.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library