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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Bimini Bath House, Mineral Wells, Texas
A photograph of an old postal card showing the Bimini Mineral Bath House, later known as "The Wagley Building." It was constructed by Goodrum, Murphy, and Croft and located at 114 NW 4th Street. A vintage automobile is shown at right side of the picture. This building was demolished before 2008. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16178/
[The Birch McClendon Food Store]
The only information about this picture comes from a legend on the back of it: Mrs. Vernon Hill father & n gof [sic] Chester Claywell Mr. Lord. grocery [illegible] Specialty Shop [written vertically] DW Griffith It is featured in "Time was in Mineral Wells" on page 128 as "Birch McClendon Food Store, located at 211 Southeast 1st Street." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39192/
Bird's Eye-view of Mineral Wells
Two contiguous negatives, taken from East Mountain, looking Southwest are shown here. Please note that some landmarks have been numbered in ink on the photographs. On the first [upper] photograph (No. 3), the pavilion with the steeple on the roof,is the Hawthorne well, located at 314 NW 1st Ave. (No. 4), the large two-story structure, is the Crazy Drinking Pavilion. The Lithia Pavilion is the structure between the Hawthorne and Crazy pavilions. Note also the Hawthorn House (No. 5?), located on North Oak. The large livery stable in the left foreground has not been identified by name. Please note the Poston Building on the second [lower] photograph, on North Oak (not numbered, but the three-part building in the middle left of the photograph). Also, please note the two steeples of the first Catholic Church on NW 3rd Street, in the 600 block, on the side of West Mountain. The large two-story frame hotel (No. 2) in the left foreground has not been identified. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16214/
[A Bird's Eye-view of Mineral Wells]
An early panoramic view of Mineral Wells is shown here. The picture is a composite of two views taken from East Mountain. Attached to the composite is a date "1901." The large building in the front middle of the picture is the Holloway & Haley livery stable. Some of the buildings are numbered on the photograph. Recognizable are: (2) The Hawthorn Well, with steeple (Right middle of the picture), (4) The original Crazy water drinking pavilion (two-story with smaller upper third floor, right middle of picture), The Lythia Well (between the Crazy Well and the Hawthorn Well), and The Hexagon House at the far right edge of picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20324/
[A Bird's Eye-view of Mountains in the Distance]
Illustrated here is a view of Mineral Wells from the southeast, looking northwest. On the left, the large building in front of the hill is the Chautauqua, built by public subscription in 1905. It was demolished sometime about 1912. The large white building near the edge at the left middle of the picture was the First Baptist Church, which served the congregation from 1900 to 1920. The dim building under the hill at the upper right of the picture is the East Ward School (Mineral Wells' first High School), built in 1906 and closed in 1926. Please note the windmills in the backyards. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16218/
[Blind Nellie]
Blind Nellie was brought to Mineral Wells by a cowboy, who sold her at auction for a dollar and a half. She eventually came into the possession of Colonel W.R. Austin, who used her to turn the wheel of the pump at the Austin Well. In that capacity, the horse became a tourist attraction. When she was retired, she continued to walk in circles in her pasture. She was given a ceremonial burial when she died in 1912, a burial attended by a large crowd of admirers. The story may be found on page 54 of "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells..." by A.F. Weaver. Written on the back of this photograph is "Blind Nellie at Austin Well located in the 900 block of N.E. 2nd Ave." This is clearly a photograph of a newspaper clipping. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25103/
[Blind Nellie at the Austin Well]
Colonel W. R. Austin came from Kentucky to Palo Pinto County about 1880, and settled on Staggs Prairie. When an infection in his eye responded to mineral water treatment, he established the Austin Well, later operated by his son-in-law, Tom Sims. Blind Nellie was a fixture of the Austin Well for years. She had an interesting history: A cowboy rode her into town one day, and auctioned her off to the highest bidder, J.H. Coleman, who bid a dollar and a half for her. Then Bob Kyle took Coleman's bargain off his hands, but Colonel Austin was the one who profited most from her when he devised a method that used her to "pump" water from his well. This unique method of bringing water to the surface was an added attraction at the Austin. Instead of drawing it up by hand or using a power pump, Blind Nellie was trained to walk around in circles, pulling the water up from below. She would pause long enough for the water to empty and, as if on a hidden cue, would go around again as the receptacle was lowered back into the well, repeating her performance accurately each time. In later years, when she became confused in her ritual, she was allowed to retire. In retirement, however, Blind Nellie selected a place in her pasture, and during the working hours of the day she repeated the ritual of walking her circle in a size corresponding to the one she had walked for so many years at the Austin Well. She died in 1912. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24964/
Boating on Pinto Lake, Mineral Wells
This appears to be a photograph of an old postcard entitled "Boating on Pinto Lake, Mineral Wells." It shows a boating party taking a cruise by motor boat, which was an activity enjoyed by many tourists to this area. The date of the picture remains unknown. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20484/
[A Bottle-Shaped Advertisement ]
This photograph shows an advertisement for the Gulf Texas and Western Railroad in the shape of a bottle of mineral water. In 1912, two gasoline-powered motor cars were added to the WMW&NW rolling stock to provide passenger service to Salesville, Oran, and Graford. The Golf Texas & Western Railroad,(GT&W)--sometimes referred to by locals as "Get your Ticket and Walk"--was built from Seymour through Olney and Jacksboro and contracted to operate motor coaches over part of WMW&NW north extension in 1912. The GT&W line joined the WMW&NW Railroad some 12 miles north of Mineral Wells. Although the contract for the use of WMW&NW system was signed February 6, 1912, actual operation over the WMW&NW line did not begin until March 27, 1913. The Gulf Texas and Western operated gasoline powered motor coaches, similar to the ones owned by WMW&NW, through Mineral Wells, Weatherford, Ft. Worth and on to Dallas. A round-trip from Seymour to Dallas was made daily by a 70-passenger gasoline-powered, motor car. Completion of Morris Sheppard Dam and the impounding of Possum Kingdom Lake necessitated abandonment of the Salesville to Graford line (and consequently the entire GT&W line) by August 15, 1936. The reverse side of this Mineral Water advertisement indicates that the building of the railroad was underwritten by Beetham and Sons. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20353/
[A Bottle-Shaped Map of Attractions]
A bottle-shaped flier is illustrated here, showing the attractions and services in Mineral Wells. Evidently, this is the interior of the flier. See "Bottle-Shaped Mineral Water Ad" for the cover. All hotels, boarding houses, wells, and activities are listed, including fox hunting. See also [Bottle-Shaped Romantic Mineral Water Ad]. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25104/
[A Bottle-Shaped Mineral Water Advertisement]
A picture of a mineral water advertisement, probably the cover of a flier is shown here. This is an example of the exaggerated claims made about mineral water. It advertises an "unscientific mixture of water, bottled in bond in Mineral Wells by Pleasant Memory, and marketed as "Donkaione." For the (probable) interior of the flier see [Bottle-Shaped Map of Attractions]. See also [Bottle-Shaped Romantic Mineral Water Advertisement]. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25106/
[A Bottle-Shaped Romantic Mineral Water Advertisement]
The interior of a bottle-shaped advertisement for mineral water is shown here. It claims romantic properties for the water. See also [Bottle-Shaped Mineral Water Ad] and [Bottle-Shaped Map of Attractions]. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25105/
[A Bottle-shaped Souvenir Booklet]
Two pages of a souvenir booklet touting the benefits of Mineral Wells, Texas are illustrated here. The shape suggests a bottle of mineral water. Dr. Dan Cupid has abandoned his bow and arrow in favor of mineral water to treat heart conditions. Among his stock of waters prescribed are bottles from the Crazy, Carlsbad, Gibson, and Lamar Wells. There are other pages of this booklet elsewhere in this collection. They could perhaps be placed together in a file at some time in the future. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20250/
[A Boy and a Girl in Fancy Dress]
This photograph shows a pre-pubescent boy in formal attire standing by a girl in furbelowed dress, with the train drawn in front of her, and wearing a fleury crown (of cardboard?). She carries a nosegay. He has a boutonniere. An inscription on the back of the picture reads: "Patsy Baughn I think Geo. Kossteson [?]" Further information about either person--or the occasion that warranted the photograph--is entirely lacking at the present [2012] date. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39241/
[Boyce Ditto's Social Security Card]
An envelope from the Crazy Water Hotel, containing Boyce Ditto's Social Security Card. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16338/
The Brain Busters
Black-face comedy was considered a socially acceptable form of entertainment until after World War II. The pamphlet suggests that "The Brain Busters" were a series of difficult questions sent in to the duo by listeners to their radio program. Further information about "Sugar Cane" and "February" is unfortunately lacking. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60967/
[A Brazos River Scene]
This 1925 photograph shows individuals, in clothing of the period, at the Brazos River. It appears to be a holiday outing. Some of the people sitting and standing are in full dress, and not wearing swim suits. The flat and sandy shore is reminiscent of the Village Bend area of the Brazos River in the vicinity of Oaks Crossing (the early Brazos ford on the main road from Palo Pinto to Weatherford) some 6 miles southeast of Palo Pinto. The opposite shoreline in the photograph is rocky, with heavy vegetation and high banks. The photograph comes from a Knights of Pythias Album. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25099/
[The Brewer Home]
The Brewer home on East Mountain is shown here, from a picture taken April 4, 1976. It is visible from most of North Oak Avenue. Originally the Murphy Home, the building underwent many renovations during the period of Mr. Murphy's residence. Mr. Murphy was a contractor who built many buildings in Mineral Wells, including the Mineral Wells High School (1914) and the third First Baptist Church. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20249/
[The Brick Factory]
The abundant clay in and around Palo Pinto County was recognized around the turn of the 20th century as a source of raw material for brick manufacturing. Rejected fine coal from the area's coal mines furnished heat to fire the clay and bake it into brick. This brick factory in far western Parker County, near the Rock Creek coal mine, was a major industry in Mineral Wells. The factory was first opened on January 21 of 1921. The factory is in full operation in this photograph, with train cars on the tracks and bricks stacked along the rail area awaiting shipment. Area-made bricks were used to build the seawall at Galveston after the disastrous hurricane of 1900, to pave both the highway from Mineral Wells to Ft. Worth as well as many of the streets in in that city, and to pave Congress Avenue in Austin. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25058/
[The Brick Highway Between Mineral Wells and Weatherford]
The 1936 ribbon-cutting ceremony to open the new brick highway between Weatherford and Mineral Wells, now U.S. Highway 180, is depicted here. This photograph was taken just seconds before the photograph found on page 97 of A. F. Weaver's book, "TIME WAS..." 2nd edition. Some of the dignitaries in the photograph are Allen Wallace, W.A. Ross, Pat Corrigan and Paul Woods. The new highway to Weatherford began at the 900 block of East Hubbard, and the brick was hand-laid by two strong Negro men. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20465/
[The Brick Road East of Mineral Wells]
The brick highway (emphatically not yellow brick!)east of Mineral Wells (the Bankhead Highway) was the nation's first transcontinental highway, beginning at milepost 0 on the steps of the Capitol in Washington, D.C. and ending at San Diego, California. Bricks for it in this area were made in Thurber, Texas (on the Palo Pinto/Erath county line). All bricks were laid by two (some say one) black masons. Bricks made in Thurber were also used to build the seawall at Galveston after the disastrous hurricane of 1900, to pave the streets of Fort Worth, and even Congress Avenue in Austin, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20467/
[The Bridge at the Old Elmhurst Park]
This picture illustrates the swinging bridge crossing Pollard Creek in Elmhurst Park. Note the Mineral Wells Electric Railway street car (trolley) in the background. Elmhurst Park was located about where SW 25th Street and SW 25th Avenue are located today. Both Elmhurst Park and the streetcar operated from about 1907 to 1913. The dam over Pollard Creek was broached, and the lake was drained after the park closed. A housing development was built on the old Elmhurst Park grounds during World War II. Writing on the photograph dates it to 1907, shortly after the Park opened, and identifies the two visitors on the bridge as Allen and Charles-- apparently father and son. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20316/
A Brief History or a Statement of Facts of Mineral Wells, Texas
A booklet about the history of Mineral Wells, Texas, from 1881 to 1921. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth21923/
A Brief History or A Statement of Facts of Mineral Wells, Texas From 1881 to 1921
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60968/
[A Brochure, Titled "Mineral Wells - A Town Built on Water"]
One side of a fold-out brochure produced by the Mineral Wells Chamber of Commerce, probably during the City's centennial year, 1981. On the reverse side is a statement: "Mineral Wells, a Texas Main Street City, looks back over a century of history rich with the tales of early day ranching and the discovery of mineral water and its medicinal qualities." Color photographs of the city and its scenic area landmarks are contained in the brochure, along with a listing of some annual local activities. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20216/
[The Budweiser Clydesdale Team]
A scene in the 400 block of North Oak, looking towards the south on Oak Avenue, taken in the 1930's. (Shadows indicate the picture was taken in the early morning.) The Budweiser Clydesdale team was introduced to the public in 1933, and is shown along the 200 block west. The "CRAZY" sign that spanned Hubbard Ave. (now US Highway 180) a block behind the Clydesdale team was erected in 1933 also, probably later in the same year the picture was taken. A two-story garage/office building, the former Seaman's Pontiac Agency (still standing in 2010) is visible alongside the Anheuser-Busch beer wagon. Other businesses noted are: Dr. M. S. Green, Chiropractor; King's Cafe. The prominent building behind the Clydesdale team is still standing at the corner of Hubbard Street and Oak Avenue. Advertising signs noted: Texaco, Mobilgas, and a sign on the seaman's building for Crazy Water Crystals. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16285/
[A Buffet Table]
A buffet table, presumably in the Baker Hotel, is shown ready for guests to use it. Its opulence would reflect the quality of the Baker Hotel. The exact location of this buffet table is [2014] unknown. An ice sculpture of a sleigh and reindeer suggests a Christmas occasion. Further details are lacking. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39161/
[A Buggy in front of Presbyterian Church]
A copy of this picture is found in A. F. Weaver's, "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells", Second Edition", on page 188. The caption states "Cumberland Presbyterian Church at 901 North Oak Avenue." Note the surrey with the fringe on top. The person in the buggy has been identified as Mrs. Flora Howard, daughter of William Winfield Hayworth "Howard", the minister of the church. Howard owned a hardware store, going under the name "W.W. Howard." He is also listed as a member of the I.O.O.F. The Cumberland Presbyterian Church takes its name from Cumberland Street, Pennsylvania, where the sub-denomination was founded. The Cumberland Presbyterian Church is currently [2014] in Newberry, Texas. The building was sold to the Church of Christ, torn down and rebuilt. The North Oak Church of Christ still stands [in 2011] at this location, 901 N. Oak Ave. The picture is reliably dated to have been taken in 1912. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24995/
[A Building at the 500 Block of SW 4th Avenue]
This house, now [2009]located at 510 SW 4th Avenue at the corner of SW 4th Avenue and 5th Street, was a part of the original Mineral Wells College. The large structure was built in 1891 at 101 NW 5th Street. The front half of it was moved to its current location, and turned into a residence around 1902. The style is Queen Anne, but without a tower. Please note the two-story wraparound porch, which is rare in all parts of the nation, except for the south. This photograph may be found on page 170 of "Time Was..." by A.F. Weaver. [For more details about the College of Mineral Wells, please see the picture "Mineral Wells School, Texas."] texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16176/
[A Building Being Demolished]
This building, once the second Post Office, had stood at the corner of 201 SE 1st Avenue and Hubbard Street. This building was subsequently demolished, and a Piggly Wiggly grocery store was located there. As of March 2, 2009, the site was occupied by the Dollar General Store. This picture may be found in A.F. Weaver's "Time Once was in Mineral Wells" on p. 149 texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39175/
[The Building of Camp Wolters]
An automobile--presumably of the late 1930's--is parked by a building in the process of being built. Workmen may be seen at the site. A legend under the original reads: "Buildings seem to literally spring from the earth when the construction of the then Camp Wolters began in November, 1940. The camp was completed in less than four months and became the nation's largest infantry Replacement Training Center. Construction cost was approximately $14,200,000." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60911/
[The Building of the Baker Hotel]
Construction of the Baker HOTEL. [sic], which opened on November 22nd,1929 It was the work of Wyatt C. Hendricks, and Company, Architects. The building cost $1.2 million dollars to construct, of which Mineral Wells residents raised $150,000 towards it. A legend on the back of the photograph states: "Unknown man looks on. Photograph taken approximately from site of Methodist church, looking towards the southwest." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39169/
[The Burning of the Crazy Flats]
The "Crazy Flats" drinking pavilion, with rooms for rent, replaced a two-story Crazy Water drinking pavilion in 1909. The first Crazy Hotel was built in 1912, and an annex was added to it in 1914. A fire in the Drug Store of the "Crazy Flats" (SE corner of the Crazy Flats building) on March 15, 1925, destroyed the entire Crazy block. The "New", completely rebuilt, Crazy Hotel was enlarged to cover the entire block. It opened in 1927, and replaced all of the burned buildings. The new building was promoted as fireproof, since it was built with solid cement walls and ceilings. The former "new Crazy Hotel" is now a Retirement Home, after a colorful past that included; a daily radio show originating in its Lobby and broadcast nationally over TQN (the Texas Quality Network), the Great Depression of the 'thirties, World War II, the Korean "Police Action", and The Viet Nam War. (Compliance with current Building Codes applying to residential rental property, is creating some problems for the present owners of the 80+ year-old structure.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25068/
[The Burning of the First Crazy Hotel]
The first Crazy Hotel burned in 1925. This photograph shows the fire as it is burning out, and only a few pieces of the structure still stand. The sign seen in the left part of the photo says "Crazy Drug Co." which was the pharmacy inside the hotel. The hotel was rebuilt and claims to be fire proof. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39218/
The Burro, Yearbook of Mineral Wells High School, 1913
Yearbook for Mineral Wells High School in Mineral Wells, Texas includes photos of and information about the school, student body, teachers, and organizations. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth299177/
The Burro, Yearbook of Mineral Wells High School, 1914
Yearbook for Mineral Wells High School in Mineral Wells, Texas includes photos of and information about the school, student body, teachers, and organizations. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth299178/
The Burro, Yearbook of Mineral Wells High School, 1920
Yearbook for Mineral Wells High School in Mineral Wells, Texas includes photos of and information about the school, student body, teachers, and organizations. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth299179/
The Burro, Yearbook of Mineral Wells High School, 1921
Yearbook for Mineral Wells High School in Mineral Wells, Texas includes photos of and information about the school, student body, teachers, and organizations. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth299180/
The Burro, Yearbook of Mineral Wells High School, 1922
Yearbook for Mineral Wells High School in Mineral Wells, Texas includes photos of and information about the school, student body, teachers, and organizations. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth299181/
The Burro, Yearbook of Mineral Wells High School, 1923
Yearbook for Mineral Wells High School in Mineral Wells, Texas includes photos of and information about the school, student body, teachers, and organizations. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth299182/
The Burro, Yearbook of Mineral Wells High School, 1924
Yearbook for Mineral Wells High School in Mineral Wells, Texas includes photos of and information about the school, student body, teachers, and organizations. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth299183/
The Burro, Yearbook of Mineral Wells High School, 1925
Yearbook for Mineral Wells High School in Mineral Wells, Texas includes photos of and information about the school, student body, teachers, and organizations. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth299184/
The Burro, Yearbook of Mineral Wells High School, 1926
Yearbook for Mineral Wells High School in Mineral Wells, Texas includes photos of and information about the school, student body, teachers, and organizations. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth299185/
The Burro, Yearbook of Mineral Wells High School, 1927
Yearbook for Mineral Wells High School in Mineral Wells, Texas includes photos of and information about the school, student body, teachers, and organizations. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth299186/
The Burro, Yearbook of Mineral Wells High School, 1928
Yearbook for Mineral Wells High School in Mineral Wells, Texas includes photos of and information about the school, student body, teachers, and organizations. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth299187/
The Burro, Yearbook of Mineral Wells High School, 1953
Yearbook for Mineral Wells High School in Mineral Wells, Texas includes photos of and information about the school, student body, teachers, and organizations. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth299188/
The Burro, Yearbook of Mineral Wells High School, 1955
Yearbook for Mineral Wells High School in Mineral Wells, Texas includes photos of and information about the school, student body, teachers, and organizations. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth299189/
[A Cabin on the East Mountain Stairs]
Shown here is a photographer's cabin about halfway up East Mountain. A staircase of (reportedly) 1,000 stairs ascend the "Mountain" from Oak Avenue. A cabin was built about halfway up these stairs (visible in the lower right corner of the picture) to provide tourists with photographic souvenir opportunities. This photograph comes from the Knights of Pythias 1925 album. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20404/
Cafe Royal
The caption on the photograph identifies it as the Cafe Royal. This building that houses it, on the NW corner of NW 1st Avenue and 3rd Streets, was known as the W.E. Mayes Building. Upstairs rooms were rented as the Carlsbad Hotel in recognition of the nearby Carlsbad Drinking Pavilion at the opposite (or NE) corner of the block: 700 NW 2nd Avenue. (The first edition of "Time Was in Mineral Wells", page 105, identifies it as the Wells Hotel.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20460/
[The Calvary Baptist Church]
The Calvary Baptist Church was originally located at 708 SE 5th Street. This picture was taken in 1975, shortly before the building was torn down and replaced by a more modern facility. Both the red-brick-trimmed native rock church and parsonage suffered substantial structural deterioration, which necessitated replacement. This series of pictures was probably taken for both a pictorial history of the old church, as well as photographic evidence of the deterioration of the structure that warranted its destruction and replacement. The new church, at this same location, now faces SE 6th Avenue. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29455/