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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. [103], No. 30, Ed. 1 Thursday, January 22, 1981
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417187/
Palo Pinto County Star. (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 25, No. 16, Ed. 1 Friday, November 9, 1900
A weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417298/
Palo Pinto County Star (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 61, No. 27, Ed. 1 Friday, December 24, 1937
A weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417299/
Palo Pinto County Star (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 66, No. 6, Ed. 1 Friday, July 31, 1942
A weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417304/
Palo Pinto County Star (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 68, No. 13, Ed. 1 Friday, September 15, 1944
A weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417287/
Palo Pinto County Star (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 68, No. 18, Ed. 1 Friday, October 27, 1944
A weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417286/
Palo Pinto County Star (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 68, No. 19, Ed. 1 Friday, November 3, 1944
A weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417303/
Palo Pinto County Star (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 68, No. 32, Ed. 1 Friday, February 9, 1945
A weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417282/
Palo Pinto County Star (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 74, No. 1, Ed. 1 Friday, June 22, 1951
A weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417283/
Palo Pinto County Star (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 74, No. 4, Ed. 1 Friday, July 13, 1951
A weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417289/
Palo Pinto County Star (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 80, No. 46, Ed. 1 Friday, May 10, 1957
A weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417295/
[Palo Pinto General Hospital]
Palo Pinto General Hospital opened in 1970 and is located west of Mineral Wells. It has been, since this picture was taken, enlarged and remodeled extensively. This hospital replaced the downtown Nazareth Hospital. While the hospital was been built, the first two floors of the Crazy Water Hotel was used as a hospital. This picture is featured in "Time Once Was in Mineral Wells" on page 168. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39173/
PALOCADE Palo Pinto County
Palo Pinto County celebrated 100 years of existence in 1957. Shown here is a picture of the cover of the official program of the pageant that commemorated this milestone in the county's history. Palo Pinto County began with its formation by act of the Texas legislature in 1856, and its subsequent organization in 1857. As part of the year-long centennial observance, a pageant noting significant events in the county's past was presented at the local football stadium. The program itself contains 28 pages of tidbits of history about people, places and events in the county's heritage, along with a schedule of events organized by the official Centennial Committee. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25091/
Palocade - Palo Pinto County - Official Centennial Program - back page
Shown here is a picture of the reverse (back) page of a souvenir program from the Palo Pinto Centennial Celebration of 1957. It consists of advertising, extolling the virtues of the First National Bank in Mineral Wells. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16329/
Palocade - Palo Pinto County - Official Centennial Program - front side
The obverse (front) page of a souvenir program from the Palo Pinto Centennial production, "Palocade," which tells the history of Palo Pinto County, which includes the names of the Centennial Queen and her court, is illustrated here. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16328/
[Panorama 1974 (fourth)]
A view of Mineral Wells,is shown, looking southwest from East Mountain over the First National Bank (now Bank of America). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16242/
[Panorama 1974 (ninth)]
A panorama of the Baker Hotel and First United Methodist Church (in front) is show, taken from Welcome Mountain. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16237/
Panorama of Camp Wolters, TX
This picture is a panoramic photograph of Camp Wolters in Mineral Wells, Texas, the largest infantry replacement center in 1941. Labels on photograph identify (left to right) Target Range, Regimental Area No. 4, Dental Clinic,Guest House, Service Club, Theater, Regimental Area No. 3, Infantry Replacement Center/Headquarters Area, Regimental Area No. 6, Warehouse Area, Corps Area Service Command and Hospital Area, Regimental Area No. 2, Regimental Area No. 1, and Machine Gun Range. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16323/
[A Panorama of Mineral Wells, Texas: Looking East]
Shown here is Mineral Wells, Texas looking east. This photograph was taken from Northwest Mountain, by A.F. Weaver on September 5, 1997. The Baker Hotel is in the center of the picture, with the Second Crazy Water Hotel in front of and left of the Baker; and the Nazareth Hospital, to the left of the Crazy Hotel. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20346/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (eleventh)]
A panorama of East Hubbard Street, taken from Welcome Mountain, showing Elmwood cemetery is illustrated here. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16235/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (fifth) ]
A panoramic view, probably from South Mountain, looking north-east is shown here. A portion of the mountain has been dug out and leveled for a gasoline station. Also visible are the Baker Hotel and First National Bank (now Bank of America) to the left of center. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16241/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (first)]
Shown here is a panoramic View of Mineral Wells, Texas taken August 8, 1974. The Baker Hotel and the Crazy Water Hotel are visible. The Convention Center is seen in the far left of the photograph. The view is from West Mountain, looking toward East Mountain over north Mineral Wells. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16245/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (second)]
This picture shows a panoramic view of northwest Mineral Wells from West Mountain, looking toward East Mountain. Included in photograph are the Convention Center, the Box Factory, and the Crazy Water Hotel. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16244/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (seventh)]
A panoramic view of the city from Welcome Mountain is shown. Elmwood Cemetery is visible in the upper left part of the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16239/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (sixth)]
A panorama, taken from West Mountain, looking toward East Mountain over North Oak Street in Mineral Wells. The Convention Center, Box Factory, and The Crazy Water Hotel are visible. Native plants are visible in the foreground. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16240/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (tenth)]
Shown here is a panorama of the Baker Hotel and First United Methodist Church, taken from the west. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16236/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (third)]
illustrated here is a panorama of Mineral Wells, looking east from West Mountain. The Baker Hotel and First National Bank (now Bank of America) are visible in center of photograph. Native plants are pictured in the left of photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16243/
[A Panorama Taken in1974 (eighth)]
A panorama of houses and streets, taken from from Welcome Mountain s shown here. The purpose of the photograph remains uncertain. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16238/
[A Panoramic View of Lake Mineral Wells]
An early panoramic view of Lake Mineral Wells is illustrated here. The lake was built by the city of Mineral Wells for a municipal water supply in 1920. Rock Creek, in Parker County, was dammed to impound a lake approximately one mile wide and five miles long. An island, visible in the center of this picture, was initially accessible only by boat; but a wooden walkway eventually connected it to the concrete dam. The dam at Lake Mineral Wells was raised because of the increased need for water due to the building of Camp Wolters and its expansion into the largest Infantry Replacement Training Center in the nation in World War II. The island was thereafter covered by water. Lake Mineral Wells eventually became partially filled with silt, and another water supply was sought. Palo Pinto Creek was dammed by the city In the mid 1960's to form Lake Palo Pinto, approximately ten miles southwest of the county seat of Palo Pinto County. It became the current source of Mineral Wells' municipal water supply. Lake Mineral Wells was donated to Texas Parks and Wildlife in 1980, and became the focal point of Lake Mineral Wells State Park. Due to its proximity to the Dallas-Ft. Worth Metroplex, Lake Mineral Wells State Park is one of the more popular State Parks in Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38090/
[A Panoramic View of Mineral Wells]
The southern half of a two-part panoramic view of downtown Mineral Wells, Texas, taken about 1910 occupies this photograph. In this view, the Crazy Flats drinking pavilion is seen at the upper left;First Methodist Church near the skyline to the right of the Crazy Flats; and the First Presbyterian Church (domed building) at the upper far right of the picture. The houses shown are predominantly in the Queen Anne style--a popular one at the time of the photograph. This picture occurs on page 133 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", first edition, 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20330/
[A Panoramic View of Mineral Wells, 1925]
A picture taken in 1925, two months after the Crazy burned. Please note no Crazy Hotel in this picture, but the Crazy Well building in the street did not perish in the flames. Also,please note, across the city on West Mountain, the two buildings owned by the Cavalry, where their horses were kept. The old High School, the "Little Rock School", and the West Ward School are visible in the upper left of the picture at the south end of West Mountain. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29456/
[A Panoramic View of South Mountain From East Mountain]
A view from East Mountain to South Mountain is shown here. At the mid-right of the picture is the gap between South Mountain and West Mountain where U.S. Highway 180 is now located. Just below the gap is the West Ward School House ( Mineral Wells first High School), built in 1902. The Little Rock School House to the left (south) of the West Ward School, built in 1884, Mineral Wells' First public school, is now a museum. The two spires of the First Baptist Church can be seen near the center of the picture. This photograph was taken prior to 1914, at which time a new High School was built south of the Rock School. The photograph's poor quality may be ascribed to the print source. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16224/
[Parade at Highways 180 and 281 in Mineral Wells]
The bi-centennial parade, 1976 is shown here in progress. A covered wagon, horses, riders, and parade float are visible in the background. The view is taken from the corner of westbound Hubbard Street, (US Highway 180) at Oak Avenue, (US Highway 281.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16145/
[A Parade in 1925]
A military contingent of the 1925 West Texas Chamber of Commerce Parade in Mineral Wells is shown here. The parade is proceeding west in the 100 block of NE 2nd Street. Please note the Mineral Wells Sanatorium in the upper right of the photograph just east of the old Post Office. Please note also the double line of angle-parked automobiles on the street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16298/
[A Parade in 1925]
A parade took placed during the West Texas Chamber of Commerce's convention of 1925. The parade is moving west on NE 2nd Street. The Whatley-Maddox Ford-Lincoln Motor Company (festooned with bunting)is shown on the corner with the U.S. Post Office across the street. East of the Post Office is the Mineral Wells Sanatorium. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16230/
[A Parade in Mineral Wells on North Oak Avenue]
The Chamber of Commerce float, with the Parade Princess, greets visitors in the 1936 Centennial Parade in Mineral Wells,Texas. It is shown proceeding along the 200 block of North Oak Avenue. Businesses in photograph include, (bunting-festooned)Perry Brothers 5- 10- and 25-cent store, City Bakery, and (to the left) part of Duke & Ayers 5- & 10-cent store. Angle-parked automobiles and spectators line the street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16257/
[A Parade of Automobiles]
A parade of decorated automobiles is shown crossing the intersection at North Oak and NE 2nd Streets,as seen from the west. A sign for Lovera Cigars is visible on the front of the Crazy Drug Company (the gray building at right middle of the picture.) The large white building in the left center back-ground is the Presbyterian Church. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16263/
[A Parade With a Rotary Club float]
The Rotary Club float in Mineral Wells' 1976 Bi-Centennial Parade featured riders, in clothes typifying the period, that represent a "Roaring Twenties" golfer dancing with "Flapper Fannies." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16141/
[A Park Gathering]
Three unknown men and seven unknown women gather in a park in front of the Gibson Well Drinking Pavilion in the early part of the twentieth century--presumably by the appearance of their clothes. Please observe the parasol that the lady on the right front is holding. The pavilion was located in the 700 block of NW 2nd Avenue, a site now occupied by the First Christian Church. The exact date of the photograph is unknown. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20457/
[Partial Minutes: Mineral Wells Bicentennial Committee, November 18, 1975]
First page of the minutes of the Mineral Wells Bicentennial Committee, held in the old Nazareth Hospital in 1975. It includes a list of attendees and a summary of some of the discussion points. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60937/
[A party at the Wann home]
A photograph of a news article describing a party given by Mrs. Chloe Schillings at her home, located on NW 2nd Street and 4th Avenue--across the street and west of the Presbyterian Church. The party included Mrs. M. R. Birdwell, Mrs. S. A. Prostridge, Mrs. B. R. Beeler, Mrs. R. L. Yeager, Mrs. Elizabeth Cushman, Mrs. J. E. Johnson, Mrs. Gus Wicklund, Mrs. Millie Turner, Mrs. Mitchell, Mrs. Thomas, Mrs. Mae B. Tiliord, Mrs. E. W. Rogers, Mrs, Vera Lang, Mrs. Ed Oliver, Mrs. F. C. Highsmith and Mrs. Chloe Wann Schillings At the time of the news article, the home, a large Queen Anne-style house, was said to be owned by Mrs. S. H. Smith. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16185/
Pasadena Heights
A July, 1906 plat of "Pasadena Heights, the Home Builders Addition to Mineral Wells, Texas." Developers of the addition were D. M. Howard, (Co-owner of Mineral Wells' first big department store, Howard Brothers), B. R. Strong, and Frank Richards (manager of the Star Well and owner of an early mineral water crystal plant). Street names were changed in 1912. This area came to be facetiously called "Jackass Flats" by locals. The Brazos Mall is currently [2008] located at the bottom of the plat, Wal-Mart, to the east of the plat. Elmwood Cemetery is at the southwest edge of the plat. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20282/
Pat-Ike
An inscription at the bottom of the photograph reads" Pat--Ike." The "Ike" presumably refers to Ike Zablosky, who came from Russia to Philadelphia in 1890. He and his wife, Fanny Jaffee, later moved to Mineral Wells for health reasons where he became involved in the fur-and-hide business. Zablosky once described the northwest part of Palo Pinto County as a "'Possum kingdom"; hence the first flood-control lake on the Brazos River was named Possum Kingdom Lake. (The story is that it was named that by president Franklin Roosevelt himself.) Zabloski sponsored a local baseball team. He bought a Texas League franchise, after he moved to Dallas, when it became available. It was to become Dallas' first professional baseball team. He pioneered the founding of city farm teams, and acted as umpire and coach. The last name of the "Pat" in the photograph is unknown. He was associated with a team known as the White Sox, which held spring training in Mineral Wells in 1911 and again from 1915-1917. This picture is dated 1917. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29810/
Paving Brick Plant
Shown here is a photograph of the Paving Brick Plant. In the lower right-hand corner is the legend: Young Studio Mineral Wells, Tex." It was established in 1921; electrified in 1925-1926; the company was sold in 1927, re-named "Reliance Brick Company." It is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells on page 162. Electrification was accomplished when the Texas Power and Light Company furnished an abandoned 500 h.p. stream-power plant for the job. It was fed natural gas by means of the Upham Gas Company's line. In 1927, the plant was the largest of its kind west of the Mississippi River, confining its production exclusively to vitrified shale material. The manager in 1927 has been identified as A. E. Eaton, who was also instrumental in locating the plant in Mineral Wells. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39179/
[Paving East Hubbard Street in Mineral Wells]
A group of men work on paving East Hubbard street in Mineral Wells. Electrical lines are present. Street paving in Mineral Wells began in 1914. On the right is the Richards House. Behind the house is Lamar Flats water pavilion, now [2008]the site of the Baker Hotel. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16288/
[Pediment on the Second Building of the First Presbyterian Church]
This photograph shows the pediment of the south-west entrance to the First Presbyterian Church (This is its third building) at 300 NW 4th Avenue. The acanthus ornaments on top of the pediment (in Classical times, a guard against dripping rain), have no real function. The dentils that line the interior of the pediment are not Classical, nor are the capitals of of the pillars. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25011/
[Penitentiary Hollow]
Three ladies (bearing bouquets), a man and a boy perch among the angular boulders of Penitentiary Hollow on the east side of Lake Mineral Wells. Their identities are unknown. This picture is probably a souvenir photograph, taken at some time during the late 1910's or early 1920's. A local story has it that the area gets its name from the "Fact" that cattle thieves were said to be accustomed to cache their booty here, in preparation to driving it on farther for sale. Therefore, anybody detected in this place (who could no give a good account of himself) was likely to find lodging in the nearest penitentiary. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39231/
[Penitentiary Hollow]
A photograph of a woman and young boy at Penitentiary Hollow in Lake Mineral Wells State Park. A dam across Rock Creek east of Mineral Wells in Parker County was built to impound a new water supply for the city of Mineral Wells. A joint committee of nine named the new water source Lake Mineral Wells in December 1919. When it became necessary to dam up Palo Pinto Creek in the 1960's to obtain a larger source of water, the city gave Lake Mineral Wells to the Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission for a State Park. Penitentiary Hollow in the State Park is one of the few areas in Texas where rock climbers may gain mountain-climbing experience. As the photograph shows, spectacular vertical cliffs, 40 feet and more in height, are well-adapted to honing climbing skills. The area gets its name from the story that cattle thieves were thought to cache their booty there, preparatory to driving the hapless animals onward for sale. Anyone detected in the area was therefore likely to find lodging in a local penitentiary. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25094/
[The Penix Home ]
The Penix Home (at 1001 SW 7th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas)was once owned by William H. Penix--partner of the law firm of Penix, Miller, Perkins, and Dean. He also served as vice-president of the Bank of Mineral Wells in 1920. The style is Queen Anne, Free Classic sub-type. It is shown here much-ravaged by time. Note the decayed "Gingerbread", the cut-away bay (not common in Mineral Wells),and the flat-topped tower, which is unlikely to have been original. The house was re-located in 1989 to an area north of town,now [2008] Bennett Road. Restoration of the house was completed in 1998. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16161/
[The Penix House ]
This home (at 1001 SW 7th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas) was once owned by William H. Penix, who was a partner in the law firm of Penix, Miller, Perkins, and Dean. He was also vice-president of the Bank of Mineral Wells in 1920. The style of the house is Queen Anne, free classic sub-type. Note the unusual flat-topped tower on the left of the photograph. Such towers were almost always turreted, flat-tops being practically unknown in this style of architecture. It might not be original; but given the general appearance of the house the condition of the tower might be a testimony to the ravages of time. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16162/