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  Partner: Beth-El Congregation Archives
[Emanuel Hebrew Rest Cemetery]
Photograph of the 1898 funeral of David Linsky (1850-1898) at Emanuel Hebrew Rest Cemetery in the 1400 block of S. Main Street in Fort Worth. Many horse-drawn buggies and drivers surround the cemetery, which is on a dirt street two miles south of downtown. Linsky, 48, was a member of Woodmen of the World, a fraternal lodge which provided the tombstone for his grave. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38770/
[Organizing Meeting of Beth-El Congregation]
Minutes from the organizing meeting of the Beth-El Congregation in Fort Worth on September 21, 1902. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38786/
Tarrant County Clerk's Daily Report for Oct. 3 and Oct. 4, 1902
Daily Report of the Tarrant County Clerk's office on October 3-4, 1902. Included are lists of deeds granted, deeds of trust, chattel cottages, and proceedings in the district and justice courts. "Claude Butler, proprietor" is printed at the top of the document. On the reverse side are handwritten minutes from Beth-El Congregation's third organizing meeting. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38785/
[Minutes, third meeting of Beth-El Congregation, October 5, 1902]
Minutes from the third meeting of Beth-El Congregation, Oct. 5, 1902, handwritten in pencil on the back of a courthouse circular. The reverse side of the minutes is a Courthouse Circular, dated Oct. 3, 1902. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38784/
Program from Confirmation Service of Congregation Beth-El
Program from the Confirmation Service of Congregation Beth-El in Fort Worth, Texas on June 9, 1905. It contains the names of the confirmation students, and the order of the program. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38735/
[Certificate]
Union of American Hebrew Congregations certificate of membership for Beth-El Congregation of Fort Worth. The certificate is orange in color and has a star-burst design radiating out from a scroll in the center. There is Hebrew text at the top beneath which is the quotation: "Come, let us take counsel together. --Nch. 6:7." The text on the scroll states: The Union of American Hebrew Congregations Established 1873 Hereby certifies that Beth-El Congregation Fort Worth, Texas on March 22, 1907 (Nisan 7, 5667) became a duly affiliated member, entitled to all the rights and privileges of membership and to full participation in its plans and activities for the PERPETUATION AND PROGRESS OF JUDAISM IN AMERICA. Samuel S Hollender Chairman, Executive Board Maurice N. Eisendrath President Presented on November 5, 1955. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38783/
Confirmation Bible of Rose Levenson, Beth-El Congregation
Confirmation Bible, Beth-El Congregation. Presented to Rose Levenson for Confirmation on Shevuoth, May 26, 1909 at Fort Worth, Texas by Rabbi George Zepin. Title page and inscription of the bible states that this volume contains "the Twenty-Four Books of the Holy Scriptures, carefully translated according to the Massoretic text, after the best Jewish authority by Isaac Lesser." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38733/
[Beth-El Congregation's First Synagogue]
Photograph of Temple Beth-El, the first house of worship for Beth-El, Fort Worth's Reform Jewish congregation. It was a two-story, neo-classical synagogue constructed of wood and stucco. Above the columned entrance was a wooden Star of David, beneath which were the Hebrew words "Y'he Or," meaning "Let There Be Light." Handwritten notes on the back of the photograph say, "Beth-El Congregation's 1st synagogue; built 1908 @ 5th & Taylor Streets. Photo from The Jewish Monitor, 1915. Greek Revival Style, The Hebrew Lettering says: 'Let there be light.'" texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188532/
[Emanuel Hebrew Rest Cemetery, 1928, grave of Ben Levy]
Photograph of Ben Levy's grave and tombstone in the Emanuel Hebrew Rest Cemetery in October of 1928. The grave is covered with flowers. Ben Levy, (b. 8-31-1881, d.10-14-1928) was a jeweler. This is the family plot in which his parents and brothers are also buried. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38769/
Confirmation Program, Beth-El Congregation Fort Worth, 1933
Confirmation Program, Beth-El Congregation, Fort Worth, including the declarations of the Rabbi and the Unison Readings of the congregation during the Shabuoth and Confirmation service of 1933, during which students graduating from the religious school are confirmed. The list of confirmands is on the 4th page. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38731/
["Presentation," party for Jewish Debutantes]
Photograph of the "Presentation" party for Fort Worth's Jewish Debutantes on November 24, 1956 in the Venetian Ballroom of the Blackstone Hotel. The women in the front row, holding bouquets of flowers, wear floor-length gowns, while men standing behind are wearing tuxedos. They are standing on a stage with curtains hanging behind them. The back row of men from left to right: Nolan Glazer, David Samson, Phillip Hurwitz, Willard Glazer, Irving Rosenthal, Mitchell Victor, and Joseph Shanblum. The front row of women from left to right: Charlotte Miller (Mehl), Eleanor Klotzman (Gachman), Bertha Samson (Shanblum), Annette Bockstein (Taylor), Shirley Ginsburg (Anton), Betty Jo Dresher (Silberstein), Louise Klar (Lipschitz). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38761/
[In Memoriam]
Wolf & Klar Jewelers' 163 employees signed a certificate giving a Torah to the Beth-El Congregation in 1947 in memory of company founder Alex Wolf. The synagogue, at 207 W. Broadway, was gutted in a 1946 fire and lost most of its Torahs. A photograph of Alex Wolf is in the upper-left corner and a Wolf & Klar Jewelers' logo which says "In Memoriam" is in the lower-right corner. The text at the top of the certificate says: "In loving memory and respect for our beloved founder, Mr. Alex Wolf, we the employees of Wolf & Klar Companies, dedicate this torah to Beth El congregation, as a memorial to his love and kindness of his fellow men." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38782/
[Beth-El Congregation's Second Synagogue]
Photograph of the second synagogue of Beth-El Congregation, Fort Worth's Reform Jewish house of worship. The photo appears to have been taken in 1948 after the temple was refurbished due to a 1946 fire that gutted the interior. The red-brick building, at 207 W. Broadway Ave., has two-stories plus a basement with a social hall and kitchen. The building's facade has a frieze above the entry with a quote from Psalms ("Give Ear, O Lord, Unto My Prayer") as well as two menorahs above the frieze. There are also stained-glass windows around the entrance and along the length of the building. A handwritten note on the back of the photo says, "Exterior 2nd Temple. 207 W. Broadway." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188533/
[Floating Star, Interior of Beth-El Congregation Sanctuary]
Photograph of the floating star which was suspended from the ceiling as part of the interior design of the sanctuary when Beth-El was rebuilt in 1948 after the 1946 fire. The interior designer was the Hungarian-American architect Erno Fabry. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188536/
["Presentation," party for Jewish Debutantes]
Photograph of the "Presentation" party for Jewish Debutantes of 1949 at the Beth-El Congregation's social hall at 207 W. Broadway in Fort Worth. The women are arranged in a curve away from the photographer and are holding bouquets of flowers and wearing formal ball gowns. The women from left to right: Charlotte Sue Louis (Alterman), Ruth Hendelman (Berkowitz), Marilyn Caughy (Raff), Harriet Friedson, Sara Kantrovich (Carr), Katherine Spiegel, Bessie Rutlader (Gaines), Rhoda Cohen (Schultz), Mary Sankary (Herman), Ellen Sankary (Smith), Idelle Engelberg (Luskey), Margie Weisblatt (Goone), Adele Nathan (Friedman). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38760/
[Fa├žade, Beth-El Congregation, 1949]
Exterior photograph of the facade of the Beth-El Congregation synagogue at 207 W. Broadway Avenue in Fort Worth. The building was restored after a fire. The congregation occupied the building from 1920 until 2000. It is still standing. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38758/
["Presentation," party for Jewish Debutantes, 1951]
Photograph of the "Presentation" party for Jewish Debutantes in 1951 in the Venetian Ballroom of the Blackstone Hotel, Fort Worth. The women are arrayed on a staircase in two rows. They are holding bouquets of flowers and wearing formal gowns. There is a palm frond potted plant at the bottom of the stairs. The women from left to right on the back row: Barbara Walensky (Zale), Esther Rosenthal, Gloria Laves, La Rue Glickman (Glazer), Sandra Rashti, Jayne Meyers (Eisen), Sonja Sandler (Stenzler), Sandra Miron (Freed), Yvonne Greene (Lewis). The women from left to right on the front row: Dorothy Prager, Sara Rashti, Realene "Bootsie" Mehl (Coggan), Sandra Zaetler. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38759/
[Cake celebrating Beth-El Congregation's 50th anniversary]
Photograph of the cake celebrating Beth-El Congregation's fiftieth anniversary, from 1902 to 1952. The cake is shaped like a book, a popular cake design in the 1950s. The left side of the cake reads "Fiftieth Anniversary" and the right reads "Beth-El Congregation 1902 - 1952." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38762/
[Groundbreaking, Dan Danciger Jewish Community Center]
Six men in suits dig shovels into dirt at the groundbreaking of the Dan Danciger Jewish Community Center in 1964. The name tag of the man second from the left reads "Jake Feldman" and the man third from the left has a name tag which says "Louis Bockstein," the other men are unknown. The sign in the background reads: "Dan Danciger Jewish Community Center Cadenhead Construction Co. Inc. General Contractor Wyatt C. Hedrick Architect - Engineer Sub-Contractors" The names below "Sub-Contractors" are obscured by the men in the foreground. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38763/
[Beth-El Congregation's Second Synagogue]
Photograph of the front entrance of the second house of worship for Beth-El Congregation, Fort Worth's Reform Jewish congregation. The two-story building at 207 W. Broadway Ave., was constructed with red brick and limestone accents. The temple's facade has a frieze above the entry with a quote from Psalms ("Give Ear, O Lord, Unto My Prayer") as well as two menorahs above the entrance. There are many stained-glass windows on the front and side of the building, protected by storm windows. At the far right of the photograph, Broadway Baptist Church is visible behind the synagogue. There is also a car in the bottom right corner, and a lamppost with the street names "Galveston" and "W. Broadway" in the foreground. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188534/
[Beth-El Congregation Building Committee]
Photograph of Beth-El's Building Committee. Four of the committee members are seated around a wooden table, the other four members are standing behind them. Handwritten notes on the back of the photograph say "Briarhaven Planning Committee" "from Len S. Construction book" and list the persons in the photo from left to right. Front row: Lynny Sankary, [Committee Chairman] Irwin Krauss, Judith Cohen, Billy Rosenthal Back row: Ken Baum, Rabbi Ralph Mecklenburger, Dr. Ira Hollander, Shelden Anisman. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188543/
[Beth-El Congregation Building Committee Discussing Plans]
Photograph of Beth-El's Building Committee. The committee members are standing around a wooden table looking at the building plans. Handwritten notes on the back of the photograph say "Briarhaven Planning Committee" "from Len S. Construction book" and list the persons in the photo from left to right. Clockwise from left: David Stanford (architect), [Committee Chairman] Irwin Krauss, Ken Baum, Lynny Sankary, Sheldon Anisman, Jane Manning & Bob Wagnon (designers), Rabbi Ralph Mecklenburger, Judith Cohen. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188544/
[Facade, Beth-El Congregation, 207 W. Broadway Ave, Ft Worth]
Exterior facade of the Beth-El Congregation at 207 W. Broadway Ave in Fort Worth. The building is red brick with three sets of double doors on the front of the building. There are two relief menorahs on the front of the building on either side of a circular window. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38774/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Breastplate]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a breastplate with twelve squares of color, representing the vestments worn by the Levites, the priestly tribe. Each of the twelve squares, colored like a precious gem, stands for one of the 12 Tribes of Israel. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This pane was transferred to a window in the Hall of Remembrance when Beth-El Congregation moved to 4900 Briarhaven Rd. in the summer of 2000. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188510/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Buck]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a deer or antelope that symbolizes the adventurous descendants of the Tribe of Naphtali. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This pane was transferred to a window in Beth-El's Hall of Remembrance when the congregation moved to 4900 Briarhaven Rd. in the summer of 2000. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188509/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Bull and a Unicorn]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting two animals, a bull and a unicorn, to represent Joseph's two sons, Ephraim and Manasseh. The one-horned animal, representing the Tribe of Manasseh, roamed the wilderness in ancient Assyria and is extinct; the bull represents the Tribe of Ephraim including Ephraim and his descendants. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature.This pane was transferred to a window in Beth-El's Hall of Remembrance when the congregation moved to 4900 Briarhaven Rd. in the summer of 2000. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188517/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Candelabra]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a Krakow candelabra with three branches. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This image depicts the original candelabra created in Krakow, Poland, during the 18th century by a coppersmith. The metalwork includes a pair of frolicking deer in reference to the opening lines of Psalm 42: "As the deer pants after the water brooks, so my soul pants after thee, O God." When the congregation moved in 2000, this pane was removed and stored in the Temple Archives. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188525/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Citron Container]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a decorative citron container of hammered silver to symbolize the autumn harvest holiday, Succot. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. When the congregation moved in 2000, this pane was removed and placed in the Temple Archives. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188522/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Donkey]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a donkey, which represents the Tribe of Issachar whose descendants had strong but servile roles. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This pane was transferred to a window in Beth-El's Hall of Remembrance when the congregation moved to 4900 Briarhaven Rd. in the summer of 2000. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188518/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Lion]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a lion to represent Judah and his tribe of brave leaders. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This pane was transferred to a window in the Hall of Remembrance when Beth-El Congregation moved to 4900 Briarhaven Rd. in the summer of 2000. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188513/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Mandrake]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting the flowers of a mandrake plant, which represents Reuben. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. Biblically, the mandrake plant (fruit and roots) was believed to enhance a woman's fertility; Reuben gathered it for his mother, Leah. Leah had six children and also gave the plant to Rachel, who was barren but later conceived two sons. This pane was transferred to a window in the Hall of Remembrance when Beth-El Congregation moved to 4900 Briarhaven Rd. in the summer of 2000. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188519/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Passover Plate]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting an 18th century Passover plate engraved with scenes from the Passover song, "An Only Kid." In the center of the image is a star and a lamb; Hebrew words on the plate state, "Next year may we all be free." This is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This pane was transferred to a window in the Hall of Remembrance when Beth-El Congregation moved to 4900 Briarhaven Rd. in the summer of 2000. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188520/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Serpent]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a snake, which symbolizes the Tribe of Dan, whose descendants excelled at serpentine guerilla warfare. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188508/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Ship]
Close-up photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a ship to represent the Tribe of Zebulon, which had territory bordering the Sea of Galilee. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature.This pane was transferred to a window in the Hall of Remembrance when Beth-El Congregation moved to 4900 Briarhaven Rd. in the summer of 2000. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188514/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Shofar]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a shofar, a ram's horn sounded on holidays that begin the Jewish New Year. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This image depicts a shofar similar to the German shofars carved during the 18th century, including the decorative ridges. This pane was removed and placed in the temple archives when Beth-El Congregation moved to 4900 Briarhaven Rd. in the summer of 2000. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188521/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Spice Box]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a spice box in the shape of a medieval clock tower at 8 o'clock; this item is used during the prayer service at the close of the Sabbath. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This image is modeled after the original spice box created by a German silversmith during the 16th century. When the congregation constructed a new synagogue, this circular pane was removed and stored in the Beth-El Archives. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188528/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Teffilin Box]
Close-up photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting an ornately-engraved metal box used to hold Tefillin, which are worn by Orthodox men during morning prayers. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This image depicts a box designed in Poland during the 18th century. When Beth-El constructed a new synagogue in 2000, this pane was removed and placed in the temple archives. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188529/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Torah Mantle]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a red velvet Torah mantle with gold trim. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This image depicts a custom-made mantle created in England during the 18th century; it is now in the London Jewish Museum. When Beth-El moved to a new synagogue in 2000, this pane was removed and stored in the Temple Archives. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188531/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Wolf]
Close-up photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a wolf, which represents the Tribe of Benjamin. The Bible describes Benjamin as a "ravenous wolf; in the morning he consumes the foe, and in the evening he divides the spoil." It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This pane was transferred to a window in the Hall of Remembrance when Beth-El Congregation moved to 4900 Briarhaven Rd. in the summer of 2000. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188516/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Wooden Platter]
Close-up photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a wooden platter in the shape of a Jewish star with a double eagle at the center and the date 1770 (in Hebrew). It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This kind of platter is meant to hold Matzo at Passover. The double eagle is a symbol of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. When Beth-El moved in August of 2000, this pane was removed, framed and presented to Broadway Baptist Church, Beth-El's long-time neighbor on Broadway Avenue on the city's near Southside. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188527/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of an Italian Sabbath Lamp]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting an Italian Sabbath lamp hanging from a hook; this kind of lamp would cast a shadow in the shape of a six-pointed Jewish star when lit. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This pane was located in one of the stairwell windows of the building that the congregation occupied 1920-2000. This circular pane is presently stored in the Temple Archives. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188530/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of an Olive Tree]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting an olive tree. It represents the Tribe of Asher, one of the wealthiest tribes of Israel. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. When the congregation moved in the summer of 2000, this pane, and all the others that represent one of the 12 Tribes of Israel, was removed and placed in a smaller window in the new synagogue's Hall of Remembrance. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188512/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of City Gates]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting city gates for the Tribe of Simeon. It represents the city of Shechem, where Simeon led his brothers to avenge dishonor to their sister, Dinah. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El, When Beth-El moved in the summer of 2000, this pane was placed in a small window in the new building's Hall of Remembrance. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188511/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of Hanukkah Menorah]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting an 18th century German Hanukkah menorah. The candelabra's branches are curved like the flowering branches of a bush. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This circular pane is presently stored in the Temple Archives. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188507/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of Military Tents]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a field of tents. It represents the military camp of the Tribe of Gad, which was known for its warriors. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. When the congregation moved to a new building in the summer of 2000, this was among the panes reframed and placed in a window in the Hall of Remembrance. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188515/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of Outstretched Hands]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting two hands outstretched and positioned to deliver a priestly blessing. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This image was copied from details on a decorative wall in St. Petersburg, Russia. Beth-El moved to a new location in the summer of 2000 and removed each of the symbolic panes. This circular pane is presently stored in the Temple Archives. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188526/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of the Scroll of Esther]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting the scroll of Esther (called a Megillah), a one-armed scroll that is read on the holiday of Purim. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This image depicts a Megillah that has a Baroque-style silver case with a crown and dove of peace on the top; it is also embossed with a scene from the Book of Esther. When the congregation moved to a new building, this disc was removed and placed in the Temple Archives. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188523/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of the Ten Commandments]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting two stone tablets inscribed with the Ten Commandments; each of the lines contains the opening words of a commandment. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. When the congregation moved to a new building, this disc was removed and placed in the Temple Archives. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188524/
[Ark and Bimah, main sanctuary at Beth-El Congregation]
Photograph, taken in 2000, of the "bimah" or altar in the main sanctuary at Beth-El Congregation, 207 W. Broadway, Fort Worth. The building was constructed in 1920, rebuilt in 1948 after a fire gutted the interior, and remodeled in 1981. The 1948 rebuilding and redesign were by the Hungarian-American interior designer Erno Fabry. His design ideas include the stone wall behind the altar, built with reddish Colorado travertine, the ark (which contained the Torahs) framed with gray-veined cremo-Italian marble, as well as the gate with its Art Deco design, and the copper-colored menorahs flanking the ark. In 1981, architect-designer John Mike Cohen of St. Louis oversaw a major remodeling of the sanctuary with peach carpet, chairs, and fiberglass lights resembling a flock of dove. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188538/
[Beth-El Congregation's Second Synagogue]
Photograph of the entrance to the synagogue at 207 W. Broadway Ave. that served Beth-El Congregation from 1920 to 2000. The building has two stories plus a basement with a social hall and kitchen. It is constructed of red brick and limestone. In the photo, the facade has a frieze above the entry with a quote from Psalms ("Give Ear, O Lord, Unto My Prayer") as well as two limestone menorahs above the quotation. The stained-glass windows on the front and side of the building are protected by storm windows. This image shows the front of the building shortly before the congregation moved to a new location across town. Several of the decorative features, particularly the frieze and limestone arches, are stained with black marks from 80 years of air pollution. When the congregation moved in August of 2000, the frieze, menorahs, and a Ten-Commandment carving were removed from the facade and replaced with red brick. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188535/
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