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  Partner: Beth-El Congregation Archives
[Interior, Beth-El Congregation Sanctuary, after 1981 remodeling]
Interior photograph of the remodeled sanctuary at the Beth-El Congregation at 207 W. Broadway Ave in Fort Worth. Theatre-style chairs circle around a central podium. Large stained-glass windows are visible on the far right and fiberglass lamps, evoking a flock of dove, hang from the ceiling. The sanctuary was designed by St. Louis architect John Mike Cohen. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38773/
[Interior of Beth-El Congregation Sanctuary]
Photograph of the interior of the second house of worship for Fort Worth's Reform Jewish congregation after being remodeled in 1981. This image was taken with the main lights turned off to show the sanctuary's 72 Castelli fiberglass lights, which evoke the imagery of a flock of doves. The stained glass in the background dates to the 1948 remodeling. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188537/
[Main sanctuary at new synagogue, Beth-El Congregation]
Panoramic photograph of the interior of of the synagogue of the Beth-El Congregation at 4900 Briarhaven Rd in Fort Worth which was completed in August of 2000. The photograph was taken from the balcony. The seating on the floor fills the bottom half of the photo while large stained-glass windows fill the back wall. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38772/
[Main sanctuary, Beth-El, ca. late 1920's or mid-1930's]
Children celebrating the holidays of Succot and Simchat Torah in the main sanctuary of the Beth-El Congregation, 207 W. Broadway, taken in the late 1920s or mid-1930s. This rare photo is among the few that show the original interior of the temple sanctuary, which featured a choir loft and a pipe organ. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38757/
[Menorah Sculpture]
Menorah Sculpture cast in bronze by artist Gene Owens. The sculpture was created in 1962 for the Galveston Street entrance to the new religious-school wing of Beth-El Congregation. In the summer of 2000, the sculpture was moved to the congregation's new building at 4900 Briarhaven Rd., where this picture was taken in 2002. Beth-El's archivist, Hollace Weiner, stands behind the sculpture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38778/
[Minutes, third meeting of Beth-El Congregation, October 5, 1902]
Minutes from the third meeting of Beth-El Congregation, Oct. 5, 1902, handwritten in pencil on the back of a courthouse circular. The reverse side of the minutes is a Courthouse Circular, dated Oct. 3, 1902. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38784/
[Organizing Meeting of Beth-El Congregation]
Minutes from the organizing meeting of the Beth-El Congregation in Fort Worth on September 21, 1902. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38786/
[Painting #1, montage of ritual images at Beth-El]
Painting #1 which is a montage mural painting of ritual images in the foyer of Beth-El Congregation at 4900 Briarhaven Rd., Fort Worth. The artist was Archie Rand. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38777/
[Painting #2, montage of ritual images at Beth-El]
Painting #2 which is a montage mural painting of ritual images in the foyer of Beth-El Congregation at 4900 Briarhaven Rd., Fort Worth. The artist was Archie Rand. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38776/
Painting of the First Rabbi of Beth-El Congregation, Rabbi Solomon Philo
Painting of the first rabbi of Beth-El Congregation, Rabbi Solomon Philo (1842-1923). Hired on probation for $100 a month, he served the congregation for its first four months, from September through December of 1902. In the painting, he is a bearded man with white hair and waxed mustache studying from a book on a table in front of him. He wears a dark suit with a bow tie and black skull cap. There are two rings on his fingers and he is leaning on the table. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38749/
[Past presidents, B'nai B'rith Lodge, Ft Worth]
Photograph of the past presidents of the B'nai B'rith Lodge in Fort Worth. There are seventeen men in two rows with a singular man standing by himself behind the second row. The men in the front row are seated in padded chairs and those behind are standing. They are in an unknown room with vertical stripes on the wall behind them and a patterned carpet on the floor. Seated, left to right: Arthur Rosenthal; unidentified; Herbie Berkowitz; Jack Gerrick; unidentified; Buddy Rosen; Leon Gachman. Standing, left to right: Jerry Wolens; Lou Barnett; Ben Gilbert; Joe Herman; Wally Nass; Sidney Raimey; Max Kaye; Milton Simon; Sidney Levinson; Al Wexler. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38775/
[Photograph of Isidore Carb]
Portrait of Isidore Carb (1852-1915) wearing a dark-colored suit, visible from the waist up. Carb, a cotton broker and real estate appraiser, was a Mississippi native who came to Fort Worth in 1882. He was one of the founding members of the Beth-El Congregation in 1902. The photograph is on a light-colored paper and attached to a dark mat board. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188545/
[Photograph of the Beth-El Synagogue]
Photograph of the east side of Beth-El Congregation's third synagogue located at 4900 Briarhaven Rd. in Fort Worth, Texas. This image was taken shortly after the congregation moved to this location in 2000 and it shows one side of the exterior including large windows near the roof. The building was designed by Fort Worth Architect David Stanford. It was constructed by DeMoss Co. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188539/
[Photograph of the Exterior Corner Detail of Beth-El Temple]
Photograph is a detail of the exterior corner of Beth-El Congregation's third synagogue located at 4900 Briarhaven Rd., Fort Worth. The photo, taken shortly after the building was completed in 2000, includes close-up details of the light-colored limestone bricks and the underside of the roof with its original copper color. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188541/
[Photograph of the Exterior of Beth-El Temple]
Photograph of the southwest corner exterior of Beth-El Congregation's third synagogue. The photo, taken shortly after the building was completed in 2000, shows the roof's copper color. There are also a few cars in the parking lot, and the lawn work is in progress. The building was designed by Fort Worth architect David Stanford. The contractor was the DeMoss Co. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188540/
[Photograph of the Interior of Beth-El Temple]
Photograph of the interior of Beth-El Congregation's third synagogue in Fort Worth, Texas. There are multiple clear windows behind the altar and stained glass windows above the altar. The "eternal light" called a "ne'r tamid," in the shape of a bronze torch, is mounted on the wall over the ark. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188542/
[Photograph of the Torah March]
Photograph of congregation members from Temple Beth-El in Fort Worth, Texas during the Torah march. The Torah march was organized to carry the six handwritten Torah scrolls 7.5 miles from the synagogue at 207 W. Broadway Avenue to the new Temple Beth-El location at 4900 Briarhaven Road. In this image, a group of people are in Forest Park during part of the march. The three people in the foreground are Sandra free (chair of the event), Steven Ginsberg holding a Torah (covered by terry-cloth covers that are white with a blue Jewish star), and Jeanne Ginsberg. Some of the other 300 congregants who participated are visible in the background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188550/
[Photograph of the Torah March]
Photograph of the Torah March, August 8, 2000, during which members of Beth-El Congregation carry Torah scrolls from the old synagogue to the new. The march was organized to transport the congregation's six handwritten Torah scrolls 7.5 miles from the old synagogue at 207 W. Broadway Avenue to the temple's new building at 4900 Briarhaven Road. In this image, those at the front of the march include several teenagers in the temple youth group. The Torahs, usually covered with velvet mantles, are protected with white terry-cloth covers decorated with a blue Jewish star. Also at the front of the procession are members of the color guard from Jewish War Veterans Martin Hochster Post #755. Some of the other 300 congregants who participated are visible in the background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188547/
[Photograph of the Torah March]
Photograph of teenagers from the Fort Worth Federation of Temple Youth carrying the Torahs during the Torah march. The Torah march was organized to carry the six handwritten Torah scrolls 7.5 miles from the old synagogue at 207 W. Broadway Avenue to the new Temple Beth-El location at 4900 Briarhaven Road. In this image, five teenagers carry the Torahs (covered by white terry-cloth covers decorated with a blue Jewish star) in a line. From left to right, they are: Adam Hollander, Corey Pew, Tommy Campbell, Micah Horton, and Sarah Rausch. An unidentified young girl is visible in the foreground and parked cars are visible in the background. Handwritten text on the back of the photo says, "Beth-El Archives, Torah March, Aug. 13, 2000, FWFTY carriers of Torahs." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188548/
[Photograph of the Torah March]
Photograph of Rozanne and Billy Rosenthal holding two of the Torahs (covered by white terry-cloth covers decorated with a blue Jewish star) at the Torah march, August 13, 2000. The Torah march was organized to carry the six handwritten Torah scrolls 7.5 miles from the old synagogue at 207 W. Broadway Avenue to the new Temple Beth-El located at 4900 Briarhaven Road. In this image, the Rosenthals are posing with the Torahs outside of a building; they are both wearing baseball caps with the words "Torah Toter" written across the front. Some of the other 300 congregants who participated are visible in the background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188549/
[Photograph of the Torah March]
Photograph of congregation members from Temple Beth-El in Fort Worth, Texas during the Torah March including a color guard from Jewish War Veterans Martin Hochster Post #755 who led the final stretch. The Torah march was organized to carry the six handwritten Torah scrolls 7.5 miles from the old synagogue at 207 W Broadway Avenue to the new Temple Beth-El at 4900 Briarhaven Road. In this photograph, the color guard includes (from left to right) Ted Hoffman carrying the American flag, George Seff with the Lone Star flag, Gary Baum carrying the post banner, and Zac Shlachter, a teen in the congregation's youth group. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188551/
[Portrait of Simon Gabert]
Photocopy of a portrait of Simon Gabert (1836-1911), visible from the chest up. He is dressed in a Knights of Pythias Uniform including a jacket and hat. Gabert was a German immigrant who worked as a cotton broker. He came to Fort Worth, Texas in 1856 and returned after fighting for the Union during the Civil War; he was among the founders of Beth-El Congregation. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188546/
["Presentation," party for Jewish Debutantes]
Photograph of the "Presentation" party for Fort Worth's Jewish Debutantes on November 24, 1956 in the Venetian Ballroom of the Blackstone Hotel. The women in the front row, holding bouquets of flowers, wear floor-length gowns, while men standing behind are wearing tuxedos. They are standing on a stage with curtains hanging behind them. The back row of men from left to right: Nolan Glazer, David Samson, Phillip Hurwitz, Willard Glazer, Irving Rosenthal, Mitchell Victor, and Joseph Shanblum. The front row of women from left to right: Charlotte Miller (Mehl), Eleanor Klotzman (Gachman), Bertha Samson (Shanblum), Annette Bockstein (Taylor), Shirley Ginsburg (Anton), Betty Jo Dresher (Silberstein), Louise Klar (Lipschitz). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38761/
["Presentation," party for Jewish Debutantes]
Photograph of the "Presentation" party for Jewish Debutantes of 1949 at the Beth-El Congregation's social hall at 207 W. Broadway in Fort Worth. The women are arranged in a curve away from the photographer and are holding bouquets of flowers and wearing formal ball gowns. The women from left to right: Charlotte Sue Louis (Alterman), Ruth Hendelman (Berkowitz), Marilyn Caughy (Raff), Harriet Friedson, Sara Kantrovich (Carr), Katherine Spiegel, Bessie Rutlader (Gaines), Rhoda Cohen (Schultz), Mary Sankary (Herman), Ellen Sankary (Smith), Idelle Engelberg (Luskey), Margie Weisblatt (Goone), Adele Nathan (Friedman). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38760/
["Presentation," party for Jewish Debutantes, 1951]
Photograph of the "Presentation" party for Jewish Debutantes in 1951 in the Venetian Ballroom of the Blackstone Hotel, Fort Worth. The women are arrayed on a staircase in two rows. They are holding bouquets of flowers and wearing formal gowns. There is a palm frond potted plant at the bottom of the stairs. The women from left to right on the back row: Barbara Walensky (Zale), Esther Rosenthal, Gloria Laves, La Rue Glickman (Glazer), Sandra Rashti, Jayne Meyers (Eisen), Sonja Sandler (Stenzler), Sandra Miron (Freed), Yvonne Greene (Lewis). The women from left to right on the front row: Dorothy Prager, Sara Rashti, Realene "Bootsie" Mehl (Coggan), Sandra Zaetler. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38759/
Program from Confirmation Service of Congregation Beth-El
Program from the Confirmation Service of Congregation Beth-El in Fort Worth, Texas on June 9, 1905. It contains the names of the confirmation students, and the order of the program. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38735/
[Purim at Beth-El Congregation, ca. 1948]
Children dressed up for Purim at the Beth-El Congregation around 1948. Standing: La Rue Glickman, Sandra Rashti, Realene Mehl, Sue Goldstein, Dorothy Prager, Sonya Sandler, Esther Rosenthal Kneeling: Rabbi Milton Rosenbaum, Don Herman, Morton Meyerson, Jay Weinstein texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38755/
[Purim masquerade ball, ca. 1910]
Large gathering of people in the hall of the Hebrew Institute for the Purim masquerade ball. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38756/
[Rabbi Ralph D. Mecklenburger, 2000]
Rabbi Ralph D. Mecklenburger, spiritual leader at Beth-El Congregation,the Reform synagogue in Fort Worth. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38745/
[Rabbi Ralph Mecklenburger with wife, Ann; Rabbi Sidney Zimelman and wife, Vivian]
Photograph of Rabbi Ralph Mecklenburger of Beth-El Congregation with his wife, Ann, and Rabbi Sidney Zimelman of Congregation Ahavath Sholom Congregation with his wife, Vivian. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38743/
[Rabbi Ralph Mecklenburger with wife, Ann, Stan and Marcia Kurtz, and Nobel Laureate Ellie Wiesel]
Photograph of Rabbi Ralph Mecklenburger, his wife Ann, with Stan and Marcia Kurtz and Nobel Peace Laureate Ellie Wiesel in 2001 at Gates of Chai lecture series, Texas Christian University. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38744/
[Rabbi Robert Schur]
Portrait of Rabbi Robert Schur, Beth-El Congregation, Fort Worth, taken around 1970. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38746/
[Rabbi Robert Schur and Rolly Schur, ca. 1960]
Portrait of Rabbi Robert Shur and his wife, Rolly Shur, of Beth-El Congregation, taken around 1960. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38748/
[Stained-Glass Window Mural]
Color photograph of the stained-glass mural "Sunset" designed in 1979 by Fort Worth artist Evaline Sellers. The stained-glass mural was moved to the new congregation at Briarhaven Road in 2000. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38781/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Breastplate]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a breastplate with twelve squares of color, representing the vestments worn by the Levites, the priestly tribe. Each of the twelve squares, colored like a precious gem, stands for one of the 12 Tribes of Israel. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This pane was transferred to a window in the Hall of Remembrance when Beth-El Congregation moved to 4900 Briarhaven Rd. in the summer of 2000. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188510/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Buck]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a deer or antelope that symbolizes the adventurous descendants of the Tribe of Naphtali. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This pane was transferred to a window in Beth-El's Hall of Remembrance when the congregation moved to 4900 Briarhaven Rd. in the summer of 2000. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188509/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Bull and a Unicorn]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting two animals, a bull and a unicorn, to represent Joseph's two sons, Ephraim and Manasseh. The one-horned animal, representing the Tribe of Manasseh, roamed the wilderness in ancient Assyria and is extinct; the bull represents the Tribe of Ephraim including Ephraim and his descendants. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature.This pane was transferred to a window in Beth-El's Hall of Remembrance when the congregation moved to 4900 Briarhaven Rd. in the summer of 2000. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188517/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Candelabra]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a Krakow candelabra with three branches. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This image depicts the original candelabra created in Krakow, Poland, during the 18th century by a coppersmith. The metalwork includes a pair of frolicking deer in reference to the opening lines of Psalm 42: "As the deer pants after the water brooks, so my soul pants after thee, O God." When the congregation moved in 2000, this pane was removed and stored in the Temple Archives. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188525/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Citron Container]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a decorative citron container of hammered silver to symbolize the autumn harvest holiday, Succot. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. When the congregation moved in 2000, this pane was removed and placed in the Temple Archives. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188522/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Donkey]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a donkey, which represents the Tribe of Issachar whose descendants had strong but servile roles. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This pane was transferred to a window in Beth-El's Hall of Remembrance when the congregation moved to 4900 Briarhaven Rd. in the summer of 2000. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188518/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Lion]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a lion to represent Judah and his tribe of brave leaders. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This pane was transferred to a window in the Hall of Remembrance when Beth-El Congregation moved to 4900 Briarhaven Rd. in the summer of 2000. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188513/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Mandrake]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting the flowers of a mandrake plant, which represents Reuben. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. Biblically, the mandrake plant (fruit and roots) was believed to enhance a woman's fertility; Reuben gathered it for his mother, Leah. Leah had six children and also gave the plant to Rachel, who was barren but later conceived two sons. This pane was transferred to a window in the Hall of Remembrance when Beth-El Congregation moved to 4900 Briarhaven Rd. in the summer of 2000. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188519/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Passover Plate]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting an 18th century Passover plate engraved with scenes from the Passover song, "An Only Kid." In the center of the image is a star and a lamb; Hebrew words on the plate state, "Next year may we all be free." This is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This pane was transferred to a window in the Hall of Remembrance when Beth-El Congregation moved to 4900 Briarhaven Rd. in the summer of 2000. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188520/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Serpent]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a snake, which symbolizes the Tribe of Dan, whose descendants excelled at serpentine guerilla warfare. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188508/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Ship]
Close-up photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a ship to represent the Tribe of Zebulon, which had territory bordering the Sea of Galilee. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature.This pane was transferred to a window in the Hall of Remembrance when Beth-El Congregation moved to 4900 Briarhaven Rd. in the summer of 2000. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188514/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Shofar]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a shofar, a ram's horn sounded on holidays that begin the Jewish New Year. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This image depicts a shofar similar to the German shofars carved during the 18th century, including the decorative ridges. This pane was removed and placed in the temple archives when Beth-El Congregation moved to 4900 Briarhaven Rd. in the summer of 2000. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188521/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Spice Box]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a spice box in the shape of a medieval clock tower at 8 o'clock; this item is used during the prayer service at the close of the Sabbath. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This image is modeled after the original spice box created by a German silversmith during the 16th century. When the congregation constructed a new synagogue, this circular pane was removed and stored in the Beth-El Archives. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188528/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Teffilin Box]
Close-up photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting an ornately-engraved metal box used to hold Tefillin, which are worn by Orthodox men during morning prayers. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This image depicts a box designed in Poland during the 18th century. When Beth-El constructed a new synagogue in 2000, this pane was removed and placed in the temple archives. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188529/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Torah Mantle]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a red velvet Torah mantle with gold trim. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This image depicts a custom-made mantle created in England during the 18th century; it is now in the London Jewish Museum. When Beth-El moved to a new synagogue in 2000, this pane was removed and stored in the Temple Archives. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188531/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Wolf]
Close-up photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a wolf, which represents the Tribe of Benjamin. The Bible describes Benjamin as a "ravenous wolf; in the morning he consumes the foe, and in the evening he divides the spoil." It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This pane was transferred to a window in the Hall of Remembrance when Beth-El Congregation moved to 4900 Briarhaven Rd. in the summer of 2000. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188516/