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  Partner: Bee County Historical Commission
Albert Praeger Home
Photograph of Albert Praeger's home located on 613 South St Marys Street. Albert Praeger was born in Victoria in 1864. He moved to San Antonio with his family, where he attended school and later trained as a tinsmith. In 1892, as a newcomer to Beeville, he married Miss Elizabeth Webber of Beeville, and opened a tin shop on the courthouse square in 1893. In 1906, Mr. Praeger, a successful and respected businessman, built a new brick building on the corner of Corpus Christi and Washington Streets. He built a second story for storage of large items like windmills, wagons, and buggies. He also installed the town’s first elevator, which was driven by hand. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78706/
Buelow House
Photograph of the Buelow House located on 211 East Fannin Street. It is a Victorian styled two-story house. Mr. Buelow built this Victorian turn of the century home for his New York actress bride, aunt of Mrs. Carl Heldenfels. A.V. Schvab purchased it for his family when he came to Beeville in 1906. In later years it was occupied by Ann Schvab Reed. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78704/
Early Theatre Production
Photograph of three cast members in costume from the play "Kentucky Mountaineers" which was given in C.P. Eidson's Opera House. In the late 1800's the opera house was located on Washington St. across from the courthouse, and had a store, Eidson and Miles Gent's Clothiers, located on the first floor. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78736/
The Westside School for Mexican Americans Historical Marker
Photograph of the historical marker dedicated to the West Side School for Mexican Americans. The West Side School for Mexican Americans, also known as Jackson School, was built in the early 1900’s. A two-room frame building served students until 1932, when it was replaced with a brick schoolhouse that stands today. In the 1940’s, the American GI Forum and League of United Latin American Citizens fought against inequality in schools. Their cases in Texas courts and the U.S. Supreme Court decision Brown v. Board of Education ended the legal segregation of schoolchildren. However, by 1938, high school students from the West Side School had already been integrated with A.C. Jones High School. Integration of all Mexican American students was peacefully completed by the mid 1950’s. Long after this second school’s ipso facto case of segregation was remedied in the 1970’s, the building continues as the Adult Education Center and as a reminder of the teachers and students who worked to improve the lives of the Mexican-American population. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78722/
American Legion Orchestra
Photograph of seven members of Beeville's American Legion Post 274 Orchestra. R. Frank O'Reilly was the director of the orchestra. The Bee County American Legion Post was organized in 1921. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78786/
Chambliss Home
Photograph of the Chambliss home located on 403 South Tyler. The house was built by F.G. and Louanna Chambliss in the 1890’s, on property once owned by the first medical physician in Beeville, Dr. Leander Hayden. Dr Hayden came to Beeville from San Antonio in the 1850’s. The house was later occupied by Miss Sara Chambliss. Fred G. Chambliss was judge of the Thirty-sixth Judicial District from 1912-1919. Judge Chambliss was active in the formation of the Citizen’s Party, a political party formed in Bee County in the 1920’s by Protestants and Catholics to break the the KKK's hold on the county’s politics. Mrs. F.G. Chambliss (Louanna W.) was the daughter of Joseph Wilson, who settled on the Aransas in 1852 where he engaged in the cattle business. Mrs. F.G. Chambliss was a charter member and past president of the Rosetta Club. She was an early member of St. Philips Episcopal Church (1888). Chambliss Hall, a large room with kitchen facilities connected to the west side of the church, is named for Mrs. F.G. Chambliss and her daughters, Mrs. J.T. (Dorothy) Hall, and Miss Sara Chambliss. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78720/
Praeger Building 1906
Photograph of the Praeger Building located on the corner of Washington and W.Corpus Christi Street. San Antonio businessman, Albert Praeger (1864-1930) moved to Beeville in the 1890’s to open a hardware store and tin shop. In 1906, Praeger built this Romanesque Revival structure on the northwest corner of the courthouse square to house his hardware business. In 1925, Central Power and Light began providing the city with water. With a reliable source of water, Mr. Albert Praeger made plans to turn the second story of the Praeger hardware store into apartments; they would be the first downtown apartments in Beeville. W.C. Stephenson was the architect for the apartments. In 2002, the new state-of-the-art Joe Barnhart Bee County Library was opened in the newly restored Praeger Building. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78723/
Interior of the McClanahan House
Photograph of one of the bedrooms inside the McClanahan house, 206 E. Corpus Christi St. Oldest business structure in Beeville, erected about 1867 on east side of courthouse square, near Poesta Creek. General store, lodging house, post office. Pioneer western style, with southern porches. Built by G.W. McClanahan, Beeville's first merchant, school teacher, postmaster, county clerk, inn keeper, Sunday school superintendent. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, 1964 texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78777/
Levermann House
Photograph of the Levermann house located on 113 North Monroe. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78758/
Cleo Ray Home
Photograph of Cleo Ray's home located on 312 South Kathleen. Robert Nutt, Sr. built the house, and then sold it to John Timon who added the porches. The John Wilson family was the next owners. They removed the kitchen and dining wing from the main building to make servant quarters at the rear of the lot. Mrs. Ray was Clara Elizabeth Wilson. The home is now owned by Mark and Debbie Parsons. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78703/
The George Home
Photograph of the George home located on 801 North Adams. The house has raised cottage architecture. In 1890, Will J. and Julia George built their home with lumber from her father, Major J.H. Wood’s house. Cattle baron, J.H.Wood came from New York to join the War for Independence in 1836. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78707/
Captain Allen Carter Jones
Photograph of Captain A. C. Jones sitting in the cart of a horse-drawn buggy. A veteran of the last battle of the Civil War, Captain Allen Carter Jones was born in Nacogdoches County in 1830 to early Texas settlers. He served as sheriff in Goliad County from 1858-1860. Jones joined the Confederacy Army as a private when the Civil War began. Within eighteen months, his leadership abilities resulted in his promotion to Captain. In 1874, the Captain settled in Beeville where he became a merchant, banker, land owner, philanthropist, and cattleman. Captain Jones contributed a large share of the funds necessary to bring the railroad to Bee County in 1886. He also served as Beeville’s first mayor, county treasurer, the general manager of the Beeville Oil Mill, and he was a promoter of public schools in the area. He is acknowledged by all as the “Father of Beeville”. Captain A.C. Jones died in 1904. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78769/
Buelow General Merchandise
Photograph of Buelow's General Merchandise store. Mrs. John Buelow was a charter member of the Rosetta Club texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78744/
Allsup House in Beeville
Photograph of the T.H.Allsup house built in 1860 in the Aransas community. T.H. Alsup erected the house, then went to Goliad where he married Miss Caroline Smith. He and his bride made the trip home by horseback. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78773/
Lott Canada Teacher Mrs. Garner
Photograph of Mrs. Felix Garner, a teacher in the first Lott-Canada School in Beeville. Her husband, Felix, was a charter member of Jones Chapel Methodist Church, which was organized in 1888. She and her husband ran the first Black cafe in Beeville. The cafe was located across from the train depot. Her father, Henry Shaw, lived to be 112 years old. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78788/
R. L. Eidson Home
Photograph of R. L. Eidson's home located on 104 North Jefferson. Occupied by Miss Lois Eidson. The Eidsons were part owners of the Beeville Opera House on N. Washington. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78700/
S.A.&A.P./Southern Pacific Depot in Beeville
Photograph of the S.A.&A.P./Southern Pacific Railroad Depot in Beeville. The marker for the railroad in Bee County is on the site of the old depot. On June 14, 1886, the first San Antonio and Aransas Pass train arrived in Beeville to a cheering crowd. The arrival of the railroad to Bee County came after Uriah Lott, the man responsible for building the S.A.&A.P. railroad, made a formal railroad proposition to Frank O. Skidmore, a wealthy stockman on the Aransas River, asking for a $100,000 bonus to bring the railroad to Bee County. Mr. Lott appealed to stockmen interested in hauling their cattle to market. The committee in charge of raising the bonus was made up of A.C. Jones and John W. Flournoy. In January 1886 Sheriff D.A. T. Walton showed Mr. Lott around Bee County by buggy, and the committee informed him that they had already raised $55,000. Uriah Lott then headed his railroad through Bee County. After the takeover of S.A.&A.P by Southern Pacific in 1925, the depot became an S.P. station. In 1958, the depot was razed, and the last train left Bee County in 1994. Before the railroad all freighting was done by wagon, and most of it came from Saint Mary's on the coast. D.B. Stafford was the first depot agent for S.A.&A.P. and later the first agent for the S.P. Railroad. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78775/
Densil Ellis
Photograph of Densil Ellis as an infant. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78738/
Photograph of Captain A. C. Jones
Photograph of a portrait of A. C. Jones. A veteran of the last battle of the Civil War, Captain Allen Carter Jones was born in Nacogdoches County in 1830 to early Texas settlers. He served as sheriff in Goliad County from 1858-1860. Jones joined the Confederacy Army as a private when the Civil War began. Within eighteen months, his leadership abilities resulted in his promotion to Captain. In 1874, the Captain settled in Beeville where he became a merchant, banker, land owner, philanthropist, and cattleman. Captain Jones contributed a large share of the funds necessary to bring the railroad to Bee County in 1886. He also served as Beeville’s first mayor, county treasurer, the general manager of the Beeville Oil Mill, and he was a promoter of public schools in the area. He is acknowledged by all as the “Father of Beeville”. Captain A.C. Jones died in 1904. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78737/
A. J. Turner/The Saffold Home
Photograph of the A. J. Turner/Saffold home located on 612 East Corpus Christi Street. Formerly owned by Mrs. A.J. Turner. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78709/
Chase Field Swimming Pool
Postcard of the "Swimming Pool, Chase Field, Beeville, Texas" as printed at the bottom of the card. On June 1, 1943, Chase Field was commissioned as a Naval Air Auxiliary Station to train naval aviators during World War II. The base was named for Lt. Cmdr. Nathan Brown Chase, who went down in the Pacific on a training flight in 1925. After the war, Chase Field was closed until 1953, when it was reopened during the Korean War to help with the over-crowding at NAS Corpus Christi. In July 1968, Chase Field was elevated in status to a full naval air station. With the end of the Cold War and the dissolution of the Soviet Union, the number of armed forces was greatly reduced and on July 1, 1991, Chase Field was put on the list for closure. VT-26 was decommissioned May 22, 1992, with VT-24 and VT-25 de-commissioned on September 18, 1992. Finally, on February 1, 1993, Chase Field was officially disestablished, bringing an end to fifty years of service in naval training. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78784/
First Methodist Church Beeville
Postcard of First Methodist Church of Beeville, Texas. In 1861, three years after Bee County was organized, the Rev. Berry Merchant of Corpus Christi assisted Beeville Methodist in establishing the Methodist-Episcopal Church. Circuit-riding preachers served the congregation and held services in the courthouse until the early 1870’s, when they built their first church on the corner of Bowie and Monroe Streets. Relocated to 106 East Cleveland in 1904, and blessed with a new sanctuary in 1955, the church continues its role in the religious life of the community. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78753/
Washington Street Scene
Postcard showing the business section of Washington Street in Beeville in the 1930 or 1940's. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78779/
Mules/Horses and Buggies near the Courthouse Square Beeville
This is an old photograph of a mott of trees near the courthouse square where people left their wagons pulled by either mules or horses in early Beeville, Texas. Picture courtesy Mrs. R. J. Welder." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78767/
Evergreen Cemetery
Beeville’s oldest cemetery, Evergreen Cemetery, is on Block 1 of the original town site map which was donated in 1859 by Anne Burke. First owned by G.W. McClanahan, the land was bought in 1862 by the county for a “public burying ground”. In 1872, H.W. Wilson donated the northeast strip. Land was added on the northwest, and the court gave consent for a fence. The cemetery was restored in 1970. The cemetery is bounded by Polk, Bowie, Filmore, and Hefferman Streets. The graves shown in the picture are those of the Jones and Carter families. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78780/
Lilly Owl Club #134 1893
Photograph of eight officers of the Lilly Owl Club Number 134 in 1893. The name of the officers and their office held in the organization is at the bottom of the photo. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78746/
Beeville High School Building 1912
Photograph of Beeville's first high school which was dedicated in Oct. of 1912. The two story brick building was located at 601 East Hayes Street, and was named for Captain Allen Carter Jones. Captain Jones’ heirs, following the example of Captain Jones who had donated six acres of land for a school house in 1886, donated the land for this first high school. In 1957, a new A.C. Jones High School was built at 1900 N. Adams Street. This school house became Thomas Jefferson Junior High until it was razed in 1949 to make room for a modern structure that was named William E. Madderra Elementary school. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78761/
McClanahan House
Photograph of the two-story McClanahan House. This home is the oldest business structure in Beeville. It was constructed in approximately 1867. It has served as a general store, lodging house, and post office. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78771/
N. A. S. Chase Field
On June 1, 1943, Chase Field was commissioned as a Naval Air Auxiliary Station to train naval aviators during World War II. The base was named for Lt. Cmdr. Nathan Brown Chase, who went down in the Pacific on a training flight in 1925. After the war, Chase Field was closed until 1953, when it was reopened during the Korean War to help with the over-crowding at NAS Corpus Christi. In July 1968, Chase Field was elevated in status to a full naval air station. With the end of the Cold War and the dissolution of the Soviet Union, the number of armed forces was greatly reduced and on July 1, 1991, Chase Field was put on the list for closure. VT-26 was decommissioned May 22, 1992, with VT-24 and VT-25 de-commissioned on September 18, 1992. Finally, on February 1, 1993, Chase Field was officially disestablished, bringing an end to fifty years of service in naval training. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78725/
Leanna Ivory Lott, Wife of Mose Jackson Lott
Photograph of Leanna Ivory Lott, wife of Mose Lott holding their daughter Nealie Lott. Leanna Lott was a charter member of Jones Chapel Methodist Church. In 1886, her husband, Mose Lott, and Allen Canada build the first school in Beeville for Black children. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78799/
Along the Road in Bee County
Postcard of a scene showing the area "Along the Highway Near Beeville, Texas" as printed at the bottom of the postcard. Note the electrical lines along the road. Beeville first connected with the outside world by telegraph on July 20, 1885, when the first telegraph office opened on the San Antonio and Aransas Pass Railroad, even before the tracks were completed. Later, in 1891, Wright Van Meter set telephone poles along the Beeville-Refugio Road to Quincy’s Land and Colonization Company. Before 1900, Beeville had two telephone companies, the Southwestern Telephone and Telegraph Company and Eureka Telephone Company. Electrical lights went on in Beeville on November 30, 1896. L.D. Rhodes set up a plant near the Sims gin. Before 1900, lights were turned on and off because too many preferred the oil lamp. Central Power and Light came to Beeville in 1925 and the R.E.A. served all other rural areas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78785/
Downtown Beeville in 1917
Postcard of Washington Street in Beeville in 1917. The person who sent it mentioned going on an "auto ride". texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78756/
Cotton Hauled by Mules in Oakville
Photograph of James and Lee Crawford Brother's Freight Co. located in Oakville, Texas. In the foreground, loads of cotton are piled onto mule-drawn wagons. F. H. Church stands in front of the mules in the foreground. Three wagons are visible in front of wooden building. The driver of the first wagon is James Crawford. The photograph was taken at or near where Monroe Fink's office is now. If cotton was hauled to the coast for shipment, it came through Beeville. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78795/
The Giles Carter Home
Photograph of Giles Carter's home, located on 306 West Carter Street. Later known as the Lutt’s Place and home of Mrs. A.J. Ryan. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78710/
Washington Saloon
Photograph of the Washington Saloon. An early saloon in Beeville. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78745/
Party Time in Beeville
A group of men enjoy a drink, the accordion music, and a game of cards. The wagon on the right, “JJ Meinrath Bakery”, belonged to John Meinrath. John Meinrath operated a bakery in Beeville in 1898. His bakery featured all kinds of cakes and bread. The "San Antonio Brewing Ass'n." wagon may have supplied the saloons in Beeville in the late 1890's. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78747/
Early Beeville Resident on a Donkey
Photograph of Densil Ellis riding on a donkey. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78751/
The Wilbur Ray Home
Photograph of Wilbur Ray's home located on 211 North Buchanan Street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78712/
W. C. Stephenson
Photograph of W. C. Stephenson. In 1908 W.C. (Bill) Stephenson settled in Beeville, and moved his family here from Buffalo, New York. In 1912 Stephenson and fellow architect, F.W. Heldenfels designed the present courthouse. Stephenson also sculpted Lady Justice, who stands atop the clock dome of the courthouse. Unlike most representations of Justice, this lady reigns from her top-of-the-dome perch, not with a blindfold, but with her eyes open. Stevenson called his Lady Justice an “enlightened justice” a representation of what Justice should be. He thought the lady should have both eyes open to see who might be trying the tip the scales of justice one way or other. She has the mandate of the law (“scroll of records”) hanging on a staff in her left hand and the torch of knowledge in her right. She is made of zinc and covered with a coating that resembles copper. Since Stephenson gave permission to make copies of his work, there may be other “Stephenson Justices” scattered throughout the country. In 1925, Mr. Albert Praeger made plans to turn the second story of the Praeger hardware store into apartments; they would be the first downtown apartments in Beeville. W.C. Stephenson was the architect for the apartments and several Beeville homes. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78734/
McCurdy Building
Photograph of the McCurdy Building, located on Washington Street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78755/
Frit'z Restaurant and Saloon
Photograph of Fritz's Restaurant and Saloon. The restaurant building is two stories with a balcony and a porch. A sign can be seen at the front of the restaurant that reads "Fritz's Restaurant." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78748/
A. C. Jones Home
Photograph of the A. C. Jones home located on 611 East Jones Street. The house reflects early 20th century Baroque-style architecture with large formal rooms , eight fireplaces, hardwood floors, and high ceilings. Philanthropist and supporter of local schools, Mrs. A.C. (Jane Field) Jones (1842-1918) built the house on this site after Captain Jones’ death in 1906. Governors and other Texas leaders were welcomed here. Located on the hill where the college stands today, the first and much grander A.C. Jones home was sold to John Flournoy and moved into town by mule and wagon. It stood facing Flournoy Park until it was razed in 1946. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78701/
Welder Family Members in Early Bee County
Photograph of members of the Welder Family. Included in the picture are Louisa Welder, her daughter Mrs. Mary O’Connor along with Henry Welder, Jim O’Connor, and Chrys Wood. In 1874 Tom Welder, son of Thomas and Louisa Welder of Refugio Co., moved to Bee County and took up ranching. He drove horses, mules, and cattle to Louisiana and Kansas, and was a rancher his entire life. He served as Bee County Commissioner for twenty-two years and was Vice President of the Beeville Bank and Trust. Other Welder family members ranched in Bee County, and the Welder Family is known throughout South Texas as ranchers, businessmen, and community leaders. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78742/
The Wiliam McCurdy Home
Photograph of William McCurdy's home located on East Cleveland Street. Mr. McCurdy was the publisher of the Beeville Bee, Beeville’s first newspaper. The home is owned by Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Garza. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78708/
McKinney Brothers Store
Photograph of the inside of the McKinney Brothers Store. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78783/
Rialto Theater Drawing
Drawing of the Rialto Theater. The Rialto Theater was built in 1922, as the flagship for the 22-theater chain owned by H.W. Hall and family. After a fire in 1935 destroyed the interior, the theater was remodeled in an Art Moderne style by the original architect, W.C. Stephenson and the theatre architect John Eberson, famous for the Majestic Theater in San Antonio. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78730/
Entry of the McClanahan House in Beeville
Photograph of McClanahan House entry way. The McClanahan House is the oldest business structure in Beeville. The building, the second store built in Beeville by George W. McClanahan, was erected around 1867 on the east side of the courthouse square, near Poesta Creek. The house served as general store, lodging house, and post office. It was built in the pioneer western style, with southern porches.In 1962, the building was purchased by the Historical Society for $600, and moved to its present site. The building is still the “home” of the society, and meetings are held there periodically. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78778/
Confederate Veterans Reunion
Photograph of Confederate Veterans at a reunion in Beeville in the late 1890's. Texas furnished about 75,000 soldiers to the Confederate cause. Even though Bee County was only three years old in 1861, many men from the county served the Confederacy. Some died for it. When the war started there were seventy slaves in Bee County. There were many hardships for the citizens of Bee County during the War. A severe drought in 1863 and 1864 made it hard for the people of the county. There was not enough corn to supply local needs. Coffee was not available. Some made a substitute coffee out of parched corn, rye, okra, beans, and even potatoes. There was no sugar available. Calico was worth $50 a yard in Confederate money. Corn cobs were burned and the ashes was used for soda. For medicine, those who were ill used herbs, roots, and bark of certain trees. Women carded cotton into fluffy wads, spun it on spinning wheels into thread, and wove the thread into corse cloth. In 1865 the war ended and the men came home. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78793/
Kimbrough's Jewelry Store Early 1900's
Shown in the picture are Mr. and Mrs. C.L. Kimbrough in front of the Kimbrough Jewelry Store and New south Land Co. Soon after 1900, Claude L. and Beatrice Menier Kimbrough left their home in Mississippi and came to Texas for relief of Mr. Kimbrough’s asthma and emphysema. They arrived in Beeville in 1905 and opened a jewelry store on the corner of Washington and Bowie streets. The Kimbrough’s and their children, “Bee” Kimbrough and Claude L., Jr., “Skeeter”, remained in Beeville for the rest of their lives. Bee’s husband was oil man, Marion Young. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78762/
Railroad Depot in Bee Country
The marker for the railroad in Bee County is on the site of the old depot on West Bowie and North Madison Streets. On June 14, 1886, the first San Antonio and Aransas Pass train arrived in Beeville to a cheering crowd. The arrival of the railroad to Bee County came after Uriah Lott, the man responsible for building the S.A.&A.P. railroad, made a formal railroad proposition to Frank O. Skidmore, a wealthy stockman on the Aransas River, asking for a $100,000 bonus to bring the railroad to Bee County. Mr. Lott appealed to stockmen interested in hauling their cattle to market. The committee in charge of raising the bonus was made up of A.C. Jones and John W. Flournoy. In January 1886 Sheriff D.A.T. Walton showed Mr. Lott around Bee County by buggy, and the committee informed him that they had already raised $55,000. Uriah Lott then headed his railroad through Bee County. After the takeover of SA&AP by Southern Pacific in 1925, the depot became a Southern Pacific station. In 1958, the depot was razed, and the last train left Bee County in 1994. Before the railroad all freighting was done by wagon, and most of it came from Saint Marys on the coast. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth78726/
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