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  Partner: Bee County Historical Commission
Washington Saloon

Washington Saloon

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: Photograph of the Washington Saloon. An early saloon in Beeville.
Contributing Partner: Bee County Historical Commission
Party Time in Beeville

Party Time in Beeville

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: A group of men enjoy a drink, the accordion music, and a game of cards. The wagon on the right, “JJ Meinrath Bakery”, belonged to John Meinrath. John Meinrath operated a bakery in Beeville in 1898. His bakery featured all kinds of cakes and bread. The "San Antonio Brewing Ass'n." wagon may have supplied the saloons in Beeville in the late 1890's.
Contributing Partner: Bee County Historical Commission
Early Beeville Resident on a Donkey

Early Beeville Resident on a Donkey

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: Photograph of Densil Ellis riding on a donkey.
Contributing Partner: Bee County Historical Commission
The Wilbur Ray Home

The Wilbur Ray Home

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: Photograph of Wilbur Ray's home located on 211 North Buchanan Street.
Contributing Partner: Bee County Historical Commission
W. C. Stephenson

W. C. Stephenson

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: Photograph of W. C. Stephenson. In 1908 W.C. (Bill) Stephenson settled in Beeville, and moved his family here from Buffalo, New York. In 1912 Stephenson and fellow architect, F.W. Heldenfels designed the present courthouse. Stephenson also sculpted Lady Justice, who stands atop the clock dome of the courthouse. Unlike most representations of Justice, this lady reigns from her top-of-the-dome perch, not with a blindfold, but with her eyes open. Stevenson called his Lady Justice an “enlightened justice” a representation of what Justice should be. He thought the lady should have both eyes open to see who might be trying the tip the scales of justice one way or other. She has the mandate of the law (“scroll of records”) hanging on a staff in her left hand and the torch of knowledge in her right. She is made of zinc and covered with a coating that resembles copper. Since Stephenson gave permission to make copies of his work, there may be other “Stephenson Justices” scattered throughout the country. In 1925, Mr. Albert Praeger made plans to turn the second story of the Praeger hardware store into apartments; they would be the first downtown apartments in Beeville. W.C. Stephenson was the ...
Contributing Partner: Bee County Historical Commission
McCurdy Building

McCurdy Building

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: Photograph of the McCurdy Building, located on Washington Street.
Contributing Partner: Bee County Historical Commission
Frit'z Restaurant and Saloon

Frit'z Restaurant and Saloon

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: Photograph of Fritz's Restaurant and Saloon. The restaurant building is two stories with a balcony and a porch. A sign can be seen at the front of the restaurant that reads "Fritz's Restaurant."
Contributing Partner: Bee County Historical Commission
A. C. Jones Home

A. C. Jones Home

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: Photograph of the A. C. Jones home located on 611 East Jones Street. The house reflects early 20th century Baroque-style architecture with large formal rooms , eight fireplaces, hardwood floors, and high ceilings. Philanthropist and supporter of local schools, Mrs. A.C. (Jane Field) Jones (1842-1918) built the house on this site after Captain Jones’ death in 1906. Governors and other Texas leaders were welcomed here. Located on the hill where the college stands today, the first and much grander A.C. Jones home was sold to John Flournoy and moved into town by mule and wagon. It stood facing Flournoy Park until it was razed in 1946.
Contributing Partner: Bee County Historical Commission
Welder Family Members in Early Bee County

Welder Family Members in Early Bee County

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: Photograph of members of the Welder Family. Included in the picture are Louisa Welder, her daughter Mrs. Mary O’Connor along with Henry Welder, Jim O’Connor, and Chrys Wood. In 1874 Tom Welder, son of Thomas and Louisa Welder of Refugio Co., moved to Bee County and took up ranching. He drove horses, mules, and cattle to Louisiana and Kansas, and was a rancher his entire life. He served as Bee County Commissioner for twenty-two years and was Vice President of the Beeville Bank and Trust. Other Welder family members ranched in Bee County, and the Welder Family is known throughout South Texas as ranchers, businessmen, and community leaders.
Contributing Partner: Bee County Historical Commission
The Wiliam McCurdy Home

The Wiliam McCurdy Home

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: Photograph of William McCurdy's home located on East Cleveland Street. Mr. McCurdy was the publisher of the Beeville Bee, Beeville’s first newspaper. The home is owned by Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Garza.
Contributing Partner: Bee County Historical Commission