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  Partner: The History Center
[Texas South-Eastern Railroad Engine 7]
Photograph of Texas South-Eastern Railroad Company's engine 7 and a train of twenty cars of pine logs. Engine 7 was a 4-6-0 Baldwin locomotive built new for the TSE in 1906. It was later sold to Sand & Gravel Company of Columbus, Texas in 1938. The TSE railroad was founded in 1900 by the same owners of Southern Pine Lumber Company and served the company's logging operations. It also provided passenger service from Diboll to Lufkin until 1942. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204401/
[Texas South-Eastern Railroad Engine 7 at the Mill Pond]
Photograph of Texas South-Eastern Railroad Company engine 7 with a train of log cars beside the Southern Pine Lumber Company sawmill 1 mill pond. The sawmill is shown in the background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204402/
[Texas South-Eastern Railroad Engine 7 - Broadside]
Photograph of a broadside view of the Texas South-Eastern Railroad engine 7, pulling Southern Pacific freight car 65087 and showing railroad workers. Engine 7 was a 4-6-0 Baldwin locomotive built new for the TSE in 1906. It was later sold to Sand & Gravel Company of Columbus, Texas in 1938. The TSE railroad was founded in 1900 by the same owners of Southern Pine Lumber Company and served the company's logging operations. It also provided passenger service from Diboll to Lufkin until 1942. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204447/
[Texas South-Eastern Railroad Engine 7 "Dozier" Work]
Photograph of Texas South-Eastern Railroad engine 7 and men performing "dozier" work on the right of way. Engine 7 was a 4-6-0 Baldwin locomotive built new for the TSE in 1906. It was later sold to Sand & Gravel Company of Columbus, Texas in 1938. The TSE railroad was founded in 1900 by the same owners of Southern Pine Lumber Company and served the company's logging operations. It also provided passenger service from Diboll to Lufkin until 1942. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204425/
[Texas South-Eastern Railroad Engine 7 Log Train]
Photograph of nineteen log cars pulled by Texas South-Eastern Railroad engine 7, located at a switch west of the sawmill. This is possibly in Angelina County, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204400/
[Texas South-Eastern Railroad Engine 8]
Photograph of the Texas South-Eastern Railroad engine 8 at Vair station, Trinity County, Texas. Engine 8 was a Shay locomotive built by the Lima Locomotive Works in March 1907. It was built new for the TSE and Southern Pine Lumber Company. The TSE railroad was founded in 1900 by the same owners of Southern Pine Lumber Company and served the company's logging operations. It also provided passenger service from Diboll to Lufkin until 1942. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204393/
[Texas South-Eastern Railroad Engine 8 in the Woods]
Photograph of the Texas South-Eastern Railroad engine 8 pulling a train of hardwood logs and McGiffert log loader 3. These logs were cut from the J. M. Walker league in Trinity County. The engine workers pose for the photograph. Engine 8 was a Shay locomotive built by the Lima Locomotive Works in March 1907. It was built new for the TSE and Southern Pine Lumber Company. The TSE railroad was founded in 1900 by the same owners of Southern Pine Lumber Company and served the company's logging operations. It also provided passenger service from Diboll to Lufkin until 1942. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204397/
[Texas South-Eastern Railroad Lumber Freight Train]
Photograph of Texas South-Eastern Railroad engine 7 pulling a 14 car train of loaded lumber and tagged with Southern Pine Lumber Company signs. Sawmill 1, or the yellow pine mill, is shown in the background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204434/
[Texas South-Eastern Railroad Office]
Photograph of the Texas South-Eastern Railroad Company office in Diboll, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204422/
[Texas South-Eastern Railroad Office Interior]
Photograph of the interior of the Texas South-Eastern Railroad Company office. General manager W. J. Raef sits behind the desk with an unidentified assistant in the foreground. Note the telephone, electric light, heater, and a safe. Raef was general manager as early as 1903 but left the railroad in early 1908. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204423/
[Thomas Lewis Latane Temple]
Photograph of Thomas Lewis Latane Temple, the founder and owner of the Southern Pine Lumber Company and Texas South-Eastern Railroad Company, seen in the company's main office in Texarkana, Arkansas. This view is looking from L. D. Gilbert's office, who at this time was the secretary and treasurer. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204435/
[Thomas Lewis Latane Temple - 2]
Photograph of Thomas Lewis Latane Temple, the founder and owner of the Southern Pine Lumber Company and Texas South-Eastern Railroad Company, seen in the company's main office in Texarkana, Arkansas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204436/
[Thomas Lewis Latane Temple Home - from North]
Photograph of the Thomas Lewis Latane Temple home at 302 E 5th St., Texarkana, Arkansas. This view is from the north. Temple was the founder and owner of the Southern Pine Lumber Company and Texas South-Eastern Railroad Company. The house is no longer standing. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204444/
[Thomas Lewis Latane Temple Home - from West]
Photograph of the Thomas Lewis Latane Temple home at 302 E 5th St., Texarkana, Arkansas. Temple was the founder and owner of the Southern Pine Lumber Company and the Texas South-Eastern Railroad Company. The house is no longer standing. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204443/
[Tie Wacker and Ox Team]
Photograph of a Southern Pine Lumber Company tie whacker and a team of eight long horned oxen. The tie whacker would cut logs into railroad ties in the woods. This photograph is likely in Trinity County, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204399/
[Two Hardwood Log Cars]
Photograph of two rail cars loaded with hardwood timber near the Southern Pine Lumber Company sawmills. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204419/
[Unloading Pine Timber into the Mill Pond]
Photograph of Southern Pine Lumber Company mill pond workers unloading pine timber into the mill pond. Workers would disconnect the chains and logs would roll into the pond. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204364/
[Unloading Pine Timber into the Mill Pond - 2]
Photograph of Southern Pine Lumber Company mill pond workers unloading pine timber into the mill pond. The workers would disconnect the chains and logs would roll into the pond. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204366/
[W. J. Raef Home]
Photograph of the W. J. Raef home in Diboll. Raef was the vice president and general manager of the Texas South-Eastern Railroad Company. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204333/
[Water Tower at Sunset]
Photograph of the Southern Pine Lumber Company's new water tower at sunset. The lumber yard is to the left of the tower and a sawmill is on the right. The water tower was used for fire protection and held 40,000 gallons. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204288/
[White Oak and Gum Timber, Trinity County, Texas]
Photograph of white oak timber and gum timber on the northeast corner of the J. M. Walker league in Trinity County, Texas. This location is 16 miles northwest of Diboll. Southern Pine Lumber Company woods boss John A. Massingill is on horseback in the center. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204355/
[White Oak Timber, Trinity County, Texas]
Photograph of white oak timber on the northeast corner of the J. M. Walker league in Trinity County, Texas. This is 16 miles northwest of Diboll. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204353/
[White School Building]
Photograph of the white school building in Diboll, Texas, showing the students. Attendance was 150 students. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204413/
[Yellow Pine Lumber Yard Alley]
Photograph of an alley of yellow pine lumber from post number 9, showing the burner and new water tower and the end. This view is looking north. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204307/
[Yellow Pine on the Band Saw Dock]
Photograph of the interior of the Southern Pine Lumber Company sawmill 1, or yellow pine mill, showing yellow pine logs on the band saw dock. This view is from the log end. Construction for this mill began on March 1, 1903, and the mill became operational on June 12 of the same year. It replaced the original mill that was built in 1894. The mill was powered by a 500 horse powered Filer & Stowell 24x40 inch Corliss steam engine. American Lumberman reports that in 1907 the mill had a daily capacity of 240,000 board feet of lumber and 65,000 feet of lath. This mill was destroyed by fire on January 7, 1968 and rebuilt by September of that year. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204297/
[Burning Wood Waste Pile]
Photograph of a burning wood waste outside of the Southern Pine Lumber Company sawmill. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204253/
[Cut Timber on the Right of Way]
Photograph of cut timber along the right of way awaiting transportation to the Southern Pine Lumber Company sawmill. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204264/
[Cut Timber on the Right of Way - 2]
Photograph of cut timber along a right of way, cut by the Southern Pine Lumber Company. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204267/
[Donkey pulling a Lumber Cart]
Photograph of a donkey pulling a lumber cart with a Southern Pine Lumber Company worker. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204256/
[Emmit Massingill, Scaler, Southern Pine Lumber Company]
Photograph of Emmit Massingill, Southern Pine Lumber Company scaler. Cut timber is shown in the background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204260/
[Fontaine McCullam, Southern Pine Lumber Company General Sales Manager]
Photograph of Fontaine McCullam, the Southern Pine Lumber Company general sales manager, in his Texarkana office, Arkansas, 1903. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204207/
[John A. Massingill - Woods Boss]
Photograph of Southern Pine Lumber Company woods boss John A. Massingill on horseback. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204275/
[Lindsey Springs Camp Workers]
Photograph of two Southern Pine Lumber Company woods sawyers in the Lindsey Springs area, Angelina County. Lindsey Springs, located about seven miles northeast of Diboll, was a Southern Pine Lumber Company logging camp from about 1898 to 1906. According to the federal census of 1900, the community then had a population of 110. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204273/
[Log falling into the Southern Pine Lumber Company Mill Pond]
Photograph of a log splashing into the Southern Pine Lumber Company mill pond. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204251/
[Logs being unloaded into the Mill Pond]
Photograph of timber logs being unloaded from log cars into the Southern Pine Lumber Company mill pond. This view is looking outward from the sawmill. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204247/
[Logs in the Southern Pine Lumber Company Mill Pond]
Photograph of logs in the Southern Pine Lumber Company mill pond. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204249/
[Lumber and Lath Stacks as they come from the Dry Kiln]
Photograph of lumber and lath stacks and they come from the dry kiln. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204230/
[McGiffert Log Loader and Crew]
Photograph of a Mcgiffert log loader and crew of the Southern Pine Lumber Company loading logs onto rail cars. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204272/
[Raised McGiffert Log Loader]
Photograph of a raised McGiffert log loader and Southern Pine Lumber Company crewmen in the woods. Note how the loader wheels could elevate to allow logging rail cars to pass beneath. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204274/
[Southern Pine Lumber Company African-American Workers Loading Lumber into Freight Cars]
Photograph of African American lumbermen loading lumber into freight cars. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204214/
[Southern Pine Lumber Company Band Saw]
Photograph of a band saw inside the Southern Pine Lumber Company sawmill in Diboll, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204229/
[Southern Pine Lumber Company Boarding House]
Photograph of the Southern Pine Lumber Company boarding house in Diboll, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204223/
[Southern Pine Lumber Company Boilers]
Photograph of a Southern Pine Lumber Company boiler room also showing an employee. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204242/
[Southern Pine Lumber Company Boilers - 2]
Photograph of the interior of a Southern Pine Lumber Company boiler room. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204244/
[Southern Pine Lumber Company Commissary Interior]
Photograph of the interior of the Southern Pine Lumber Company commissary in 1903. Stocking almost everything carried by a modern "superstore" as well as such items as fiddle strings, horse collars, coffins and caskets, it was a complete shopping center and mall under one roof. It also contained doctor offices, a drug store, and the post office. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204210/
[Southern Pine Lumber Company Dry Kilns]
Photograph of the Southern Pine Lumber Company dry kilns, also showing workers with a cart of lumber. The kilns were built by the National Dry Kiln Company of Indianapolis, Indiana. The structure consisted of six rooms 2,400 square feet each that could hold up to 300,000 feet of lumber and turn out 100,000 feet of dried stock daily. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204235/
[Southern Pine Lumber Company Dry Kilns - Aerial]
Photograph of the Southern Pine Lumber Company dry kilns. The kilns were built by the National Dry Kiln Company of Indianapolis, Indiana. The structure consisted of six rooms 2,400 square feet each that could hold up to 300,000 feet of lumber and turn out 100,000 feet of dried stock daily. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204226/
[Southern Pine Lumber Company Dry Kilns - Aerial 2]
Photograph of the Southern Pine Lumber Company dry kilns. The kilns were built by the National Dry Kiln Company of Indianapolis, Indiana. The structure consisted of six rooms 2,400 square feet each that could hold up to 300,000 feet of lumber and turn out 100,000 feet of dried stock daily. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204233/
[Southern Pine Lumber Company Dry Shed - Aerial]
Photograph of the Southern Pine Lumber Company dry shed with stacked lumber surrounding the building. The planing mill is depicted in the background on the left. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204232/
[Southern Pine Lumber Company Lath Mill]
Photograph of the interior of the Southern Pine Lumber Company lath mill with workers and nearby machinery. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204222/