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  Partner: Irving Archives
 Resource Type: Photograph
Henry Britain Home
The home of Henry W. Britain, the rancher who sold eighty acres to J.O. Schulze and Otis Brown for the original Irving townsite. The land sold for $30 an acre. This home was located near Nursery and Perry roads. Further to the south, Britain watered his livestock at the pond near the intersection of Nursery and Irving Blvd. The Britain family came to this area in 1859. Dave, Lee, Eunice, and Henry W. Britain are among those in the photo. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3264/
Hezekiah and Elizabeth Story
Hezekiah and Elizabeth Story. The Story family came from Illinois to the area that would later become Irving in 1855. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3238/
Hezekiah Story Family
The Story family was one of the pioneer families to the region. Here Hezekiah Story is pictured with his family. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3236/
Howard-Beaufford House
Constructed in May 1904 as the home of Joseph B. Howard and his wife, Susan, it stood on 2.5 acres just south of Irving's city limits. Eugene and May Ann Beaufford bought the property in 1919. They operated a truck farm on the acreage. They later divided the land among their children. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3296/
Iron Bridge Across the West Fork of the Trinity River Near Irving, Texas
This bridge was on the main road from Dallas to Irving. It crossed the West Fork of the Trinity River just north of Eagle Ford in what today is west Dallas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3350/
Irving Cotton Gin
The cotton gin, located at Irving Boulevard and Britain, was dismantled about 1916. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3263/
Irving High School Football Team, 1924
Irving High School football team, district champs, 1924. Back row: Vernon Thompkens, Lynn Harkey, Coach Fred Nance, Noel Toney, and Edwin Metker. Front row: Marshall “Bobby” Anderson, Harland Cunningham, Julius Toney, Eugene Grider, Ralph Plumber, J. L. Crosby, John Britain, and W. S. Fields, with water boy John Steele texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3248/
Irving High School Girls' Basketball Team, 1922
Irving High School girls' basketball team, 1922. Left to right are: Mae Mitchell, Exie Cunningham, Delma Crowe, Wilma Harkey, unidentified, Lillian Embree texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3262/
Irving High School Graduating Class of 1916
Graduating class of Irving High School, 1916. First row, front to back, are: Osten Cushenberry, Frank Haley, and Roy Lively. Second row, front to back, are: Theo Dehaes, Inez Moore, Homer Duckworth. Third row, front to back, are: Susie Clark, Velma Duckworth, and Roy Miller. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3249/
Irving Index Workshop
This building served as the home of the "Irving Index" in Irving. It was built behind the home of the newspaper's owner, R. M. Hudson. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3272/
Irving Motoring Enthusiasts
Early Irvingites prepare for a motor outing, c. 1912. On the left is the Schulze family automobile and on the right is the Robinson family car. The boy on the running board is Joe Williamson. Behind the wheel is Percy Schulze and next to him is his wife, Virginia. In the other vehicle, in no particular order are, Mr. T. G. Robinson, Mr. Williamson, May Williamson, Mrs. T. G. Robinson, Ward Robinson, and Mrs. Marsh. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3268/
Irving School Fifth Grade Class, 1922-23
Irving School 5th grade class, 1922-23. The Irving Independent School District was established in 1909. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3327/
Irving School Sixth Grade Class, 1923 - 1924
The sixth grade class of the Irving Schools, 1923-24. Charles Schulze is on top row, second from left. Charles Schulze was the nephew of Irving's co-founder J. O. Schulze. The Schulze family ran Irving Lumber Company for many decades. Charles Schulze was a member of the city commission and worked to make Irving a home rule city in the early 1950s. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3328/
Irving School's Third Grade Class, c. 1930s
Mrs. White's third grade class, c. 1930s. The Irving Independent School District was established in 1909. The building in this photograph was a three-story red brick building that was constructed in 1913. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3258/
Irving State Bank Board of Directors, 1949
Members of the Irving State Bank board of directors, 1949. Standing left to right are: Dr. F. M. Gilbert; W. E. Harrington; John Brandenburg; Charlie Lucas; and Zack Gilliland; seated left to right are: Charles Schulze, Jr.; Louis Blaylock; Mac Clawson; Bill Gilbert; Larry Bellah; W. H. (Boots) Roberts; and Gus Crassons. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3300/
Irving Student Body at the Water Tower
The student body of the Irving Independent School District gathers at the water tower, which was in the middle of the intersection of Main and First streets (Irving Blvd.), to celebrate growing to a district of 500 students, c. 1915. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3242/
Irving Train Depot
Two men in front of the Irving train depot. The Chicago, Rock Island & Gulf Railway built this depot in 1904. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3225/
J. B. Howard House
A lady standing on a porch at the Howard home at 318 Iowa (now O’Connor Rd.), believed to be Irving's oldest existing house, built in 1904. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3298/
J. O. and Agnes Schulze, c. 1904
J. O. Schulze and his wife Agnes Sueppel Schulze in the doorway of their home, c. 1904. J. O. Schulze co-foundef the city of Irving, Texas, in 1903. He married Agnes Sueppel during that same year. Both were natives of Iowa City, Iowa. Due to Agnes's poor health, the couple left Irving and returned to Iowa City in 1905. The man in the center of the doorway is unidentified. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3337/
J. O. Schulze at Desk in Tent, c. 1902
J. O. Schulze, head of a Chicago, Rock Island & Gulf Railway survey crew, at work in his field tent, c. 1902. The survey crew worked in Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. In Texas, they worked a ten-mile stretch between Dallas and Fort Worth. Schulze and fellow crew member Otis Brown remained in the area and founded the town of Irving along the tracks between Dallas and Fort Worth in 1903. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3335/
J. O. Schulze, c. 1960
Portrait of J. O. Schulze smoking a pipe, c. 1960. J. O. Schulze co-founded the city of Irving, Texas, in 1903. He was born in Iowa City, Iowa, in 1875. He was head of a Chicago, Rock Island & Gulf Railway survey crew when he came to Texas. He left the crew and founded the town of Irving along the tracks of the CRI&G between Dallas and Fort Worth in December 1903. During the summer of 1903, he married Agnes Sueppel Schulze in Iowa City, Iowa. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3346/
J. O. Schulze in Suit and Derby, c. 1904
J. O. Schulze in suit, overcoat, and derby, c. 1904. J. O. Schulze was co-founder of the town of Irving, Texas, in December of 1903. He had been leader of a Chicago, Rock Island & Gulf Railway survey crew that worked a ten-mile stretch between Dallas and Fort Worth. He and fellow crew member Otis Brown decided to remain in the area, and they established the town of Irving in 1903. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3348/
J. O. Schulze's House in Irving, c. 1904
Home of J. O. and Agnes Schulze in Irving, Texas, c. 1904. J. O. Schulze was the co-founder of the city of Irving in 1903. He and his wife built this house in Irving in about 1904. Due to Agnes's poor health, the couple had to return to Iowa City, Iowa in 1905. The house, which stood on the east side of Ohio Street in the first block south of present-day Irving Boulevard, burned in the mid-1980s. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3307/
[J. O. Shulze Playing with a Fox Puppy]
Photograph of J. O. Schulze, the leader of a Chicago, Rock Island & Gulf Railway survey crew, playing with the crew's pet fox, c. 1902. He is sitting on the ground outside of a tent and has the fox in his lap. The crew worked in Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas. In Texas, they worked a stretch of line between Dallas and Fort Worth, Texas. J. O. Schulze and Otis Brown, another crew member, remained behind and established the town of Irving along the tracks between Dallas and Fort Worth in 1903. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3355/
Jerry and Della Story
Jerry and Della Story. When the post office moved from the Kit community to the town of Irving in 1904, Jerry Story served as temporary postmaster. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3226/
Joseph Schulze
Joseph Schulze, father of J. O. Schulze and C. P. Schulze, n.d. J. O. Schulze co-founded the city of Irving, Texas, in 1903. He started Irving Lumber Company that same year. J. O. returned to Iowa City in 1905, and his brother C. P. ran Irving Lumber from 1905 until his death in 1957. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3325/
Kit Store and Ike Story Family
Postmaster Isaac Henry “Ike” Story sits in front of the post office and general store for the community of Kit. The sign on top of the building spells out the name of Kit, but with an eye instead of an "i". People in photo: Nancy Story (wife), Ike Story, Lillie Leona Story Kinney (daughter), Opal Elizabeth Kinney (granddaughter), and Sallie Jane Story Bell (daughter). The Kit community was about a mile east of where Irving would be established in 1903. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3277/
Landscape-Water and Shoreline, c. 1902
An unidentified body of water and shoreline. This photo was taken by a member of the railroad survey crew that did work in Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Texas for the Chicago, Rock Island & Gulf Railway in 1902. The crew surveyed a ten mile stretch of track between Dallas and Fort Worth, Texas. Two men who were members of the crew at that time later founded the town of Irving (1903). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3365/
Lloyd Smith and Brother
Lloyd and Bertie Smith, sons of William and Virginia Smith, area pioneers in the Union Bower community, c. 1894. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3233/
Lucas and Joffre Store
Lucas and Joffre Store was founded by W. D. "Doug" Lucas and Fred Joffre in 1906 on the west side of Irving's Main Street. Lucas and Joffre split, but W. D. Lucas maintained a store on Main Street until he died in 1931. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3281/
Lucas Children in Front of Car
Lorene Lucas (Looper) flanked by her brothers Howard and Ray. These were the children of W. D. Lucas, who was a long-time owner of a general merchandise store on Main St. The three pose in front of Lorene's new car in 1929. In an interview, Lorene said that the dress she was wearing was blue and yellow and matched the blue car with its yellow trim. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3284/
Lucas Family
Lucas family left to right: Mahala Williams Lucas Roberts, Henry Lucas, Doug Lucas, Charlie Lucas, Jack Lucas, and Etta Williams Roberts texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3250/
E. M. Story Children, 1909
The children of E. M. Story. Left to right are: Louis, Myrtle, Clarence, and Jane, 1909. The Story family were some of the first pioneers in northwest Dallas County. They came to the Irving area during the mid-nineteenth century. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3332/
E. M. Story House, 1909
E. M. Story house, 1909. The Story family came to the Irving area during the second half of the 19th century. This house was on Britain Road near old downtown Irving. Shown in the picture are: front row: Clarence, Jane, and Myrtle Story; back row: unidentified, E. M. Story, and his wife Kate. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3333/
Main Street, Irving, Texas
This photo is taken looking north up Main Street. The town's water tower was over a well in the middle of the intersection of Main Street and First Street (today Irving Blvd.). Main Street dead-ended into the railroad depot. The depot can be seen behind the water tower. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3252/
Main Street Irving, Texas, c. 1904
West side of Main Street, Irving, Texas, shortly after the founding of the town in December 1903. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3283/
Man Posing with a Horse at Surveyors' Camp, c. 1902
A man and a horse in a field with survey crew camp in background, c. 1902. A Chicago, Rock Island & Gulf survey crew surveyed a ten-mile stretch between Dallas and Fort Worth, Texas in 1902. Two of the members remained behind and founded the town of Irving along the tracks in 1903. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3356/
Man Sitting on a Horse, c. 1902
A man sitting on a horse. The Chicago, Rock Island & Gulf survey crew camp can be seen in the background, c. 1902. The crew worked in Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. They worked a ten- mile stretch between Dallas and Fort Worth, Texas. Two of the crew members remained behind and founded the town of Irving along the tracks in 1903. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3354/
Man Standing in Field, c. 1902
Unidentified member of the Chicago, Rock Island & Gulf Railway survey crew. The crew worked and ten-mile stretch of track between Dallas and Fort Worth in 1902. Two of the crew members remained behind and founded the town of Irving in 1903. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3361/
Miss Hicks Millinery
Fannie Hicks ran a millinery store on Main Street during Irving's early years. She later married T. C. Haley, the proprietor of another Main Street business. In 1909, she closed her store. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3280/
Model T Ford
Model T Ford Pickup. In the vehicle are W. D. Lucas's sons Howard and Ray, c. 1915 texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3239/
Mrs. B. L. Pierce's House
This house was located at the northeast corner of Second and Ohio streets. Shown standing on the steps is Mrs. B. L. Pierce. Prior to Irving's receiving bus service in 1930, she operated a jitney service from Irving to Dallas for Irvingites. The man on the left is Grover Pierce, the little girl is Doris Jean Taylor, and the woman in the fur coat is Mrs. Buck Mitchell. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3254/
Mrs. Pierce's Jitney Service
Before Irving received bus service, one of the ways to travel to downtown Dallas was on one of the local jitney services. Mrs. B. L. Pierce operated a jitney service from Irving to Dallas and back. Here she poses with some of her customers, c. 1915. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3246/
Musicians in the Union Bower Community
This group of musicians played for square dances in the Union Bower community. Dances were held in the fall and winter because the weather was too hot during the summer. Left to right are: Tom Owens, Earl Steele, Lillie Owens, and Tom Wright. Lloyd Smith called the square dances, but is not in the picture. Union Bower was a farming community on the eastern edge of the city of Irving. The community was established about 1880. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3232/
Myrtle Story White and Jim White, 1919
Photograph of Myrtle Story White and husband Jim White, 1919. They are standing on a dirt road in front of a a white picket fence. The Story family was one of the pioneer families of northwest Dallas County. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3331/
The Northwest Dallas County Civic Association
A group of citizens from northwest Dallas County banded together in 1931 to form the Northwest Dallas County Civic Association. Its purpose was to promote the development of the northwest section of Dallas County. They presented the interests of Irving and the surrounding area to county and state governments. They were particularly concerned with road improvment in this area of the county. The group is standing in front of Irving's first city hall. From left to right, starting with the man in the hat, are: Lewis Hancock; the boy is F. M. Gilbert, Jr.; his father, Dr. F. M. Gilbert, Sr.; W. B. Gilbert; Frank Haley; C. P. Caldwell; W. P. Gandy; T. A. Jasper; R. E. Fulton; James Poppelwell; Albert Farine; J. E. Van Horn, Sr.; and R. J. (Leo) Byrd. The photograph in the Bates Collection from which this was scanned was missing part of the left and right sides. The original photograph also included Tom Peters on the far left (to the left of Lewis Hancock), Bob Stewart, second from the right (he is partially visible behind R. J. Byrd), and C. P Schulze on the far right. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3267/
Old Gilbert Home
The D. W. Gilbert home stood from 1882 to 1955 near the northwest corner of Story and Grauwyler Roads. Dr. D. W. Gilbert was one of the first physicians to practice in the Irving area. In addition to his work as a physician, he operated a 1,500-acre farm and orchard and a dairy. He also owned farmland in Euless, Shady Grove, and Bear Creek. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3278/
Otis Brown's First House in Irving
Otis Brown built the first house in Irving in 1903. He and his wife Netta lived there until they built a larger home in 1905. Brown sold this home to Chaney Miller. Miller had it enlarged, and he or a member of his family lived in the house until it was torn down in the 1970s. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3287/
Pet Dog of the Railroad Survey Crew, c. 1902
A dog sitting on a chair in front of a tent. The dog was a pet of a Chicago, Rock Island & Gulf survey crew. The crew worked in Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. In Texas, they worked a ten-mile stretch between Dallas and Fort Worth. Two of the crew members remained in the area and founded the town of Irving along the tracks in 1903. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3369/
Pierce and Ramsey Store - Interior
Grover Pierce and Hershel Ramsey operated a grocery store along Irving's Main Street. In this photo, Grover Pierce is behind the counter wearing a white hat. Hershel Ramsey is in the chair on the right. The woman in black in the center of the photo is Fannie Tompkins Haley, the wife of Tom Haley. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3282/