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  Partner: Longview Public Library
 Decade: 1950-1959
[Bish Mathis Typewriting School]
Photograph of the staff of the Bish Mathis Typewriting School in Longview, Texas. Mathis opened the school in 1935 on Green Street, where it remained until 1937. He then moved the school to the Glover Crim Building. From left to right, the staff members pictured are: Top row: Bish Mathis, Don Khoury, John Ben Sheppard, unknown. Bottom row: unknown, Oscar Jones, Josh Moore. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth191277/
[Cody B. Culpepper]
Photograph of Cody B. Culpepper of Longview, Texas. Mr. Culpepper was Longview's primary photographer and historian. Mr. Culpepper is standing next to his camera in the photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth403392/
East Texas Skyscraper
Photographic postcard of the First National Bank, in Longview, Texas, as noted on the back of the postcard. The building was located at 213 E. Tyler, and it was "the tallest building in Longview, reaching a height of 145 feet." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth191181/
[LeTourneau College Dormitories]
Photograph of the parking lot and the entrance to LeTourneau College in Longview, Texas. The college dormitories are shown in the photograph; they were formerly a part of Harmon Hospital. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth191326/
[LeTourneau Hotel]
Photograph of a LeTourneau Industries hotel, which was designed by Evelyn LeTourneau of Longview, Texas. Evelyn was married to Robert G. LeTourneau, the founder of LeTourneau Industries. The photograph shows an aerial view of the hotel, which was built in Vicksburg, Mississippi. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth191337/
[LeTourneau Industries]
Photograph of a log train designed and built by Robert G. LeTourneau, the owner of LeTourneau Industries. The log train is hauling lumber through downtown Longview, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth191318/
[LeTourneau Industries]
Photograph of a completed offshore oil rig located in the Gulf of Mexico. The rig was built at the LeTourneau Industries oil rig building facility near Vicksburg, Mississippi, which began operation in 1944. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth191325/
[LeTourneau Industries]
Photograph of the LeTourneau Industries oil rig building facility near Vicksburg, Mississippi, which began operation in 1944. The photograph shows three rigs under construction. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth191324/
[LeTourneau Industries]
Photograph of the LeTourneau Industries oil rig building facility near Vicksburg, Mississippi, which began operation in 1944. The photograph shows the final testing for one of the oil rigs built at the facility. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth191323/
[LeTourneau Plane and Car]
Photograph of Robert G. LeTourneau's station wagon and airplane. LeTourneau founded a Christian radio station, called KLTI, in Longview, Texas. The vehicles were affiliated with the radio station. The back of the station wagon was equipped with radio broadcasting equipment for on the spot interviews. The car was nicknamed the "Weasel" and the plane was called the "Seeing Eye." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth191319/
[LeTourneau Radio Station]
Photograph of Robert G. LeTourneau's Christian broadcasting radio station, called KLTI, which was located in Longview, Texas. In the photograph, the radio station is shown in the middle of a field, and there is a tall radio tower to the right of the station. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth191320/
[Robert G. and Evelyn LeTourneau]
Photograph of Robert G. and Evelyn LeTourneau of Longview, Texas. The couple is pictured in front of the old WWII bomber that Mr. LeTourneau purchased to travel to missionary fields all over the world, as well as to oversee plant production and projects all over the United States. The couple is standing with two other unidentified men. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth191302/
[Teague Residence]
Photograph of the Teague family home in Longview, Texas. The home is two stories with a large wrap-around porch. It has blue and white wood paneling on the exterior. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth191226/