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  Partner: Museum of the American Railroad
[Burt C. Blanton at the Depot in Erwin, Tennessee]

[Burt C. Blanton at the Depot in Erwin, Tennessee]

Date: June 10, 1979
Creator: unknown
Description: The author - Burt C. Blanton - stands on the open platform of the Clinchfield Railroad's Office Car No. 100, which is located on a siding adjacent to the passenger depot at Erwin, Tennessee. The time is noon, Sunday, June 10, 1979. This was a modern car with a complement of conventional equipment. The exterior was painted dark green. The cars letterboard bore the name "Clinchfield" plus the number 100 positioned on either side, centered below the windows, all in gold leaf. There was a gold stripe near the car's base, running along each side and across the rear-end platform. Office Car No. 100 was formerly an Atlantic Coast Lines dining car bearing the name "Orlando" and the car was rebuilt in the Clinchfield's Erwin Shops.
Contributing Partner: Museum of the American Railroad
[Clinchfield's Railroad's Special Excursion train]

[Clinchfield's Railroad's Special Excursion train]

Date: June 10, 1979
Creator: unknown
Description: A survivor of the "Glory Days of Steam" - the author: Burt C. Blanton - momentarily delays departure of the Clinchfield Railroad's special excursion train wich is standing at the Marion, North Carolina Depot; scheduled to leave at 9:00 am on Sunday morning, June 10, 1979. The train is headed by the Clinchfield's passenger locomotives, No. 200, type FP-7A, and No. 800, type F-7A. The consist was eight cars. The train's route was in a northerly direction from Marion to Erwin, Tennessee - a rail distance of 82.3 miles. The Clinchfield Railroad is a typical mountain line (standard gauge) - 275 miles in length - completed on February 9, 1915, at an average cost of $201,000 per mile. It's rails traverse a portion of the Blue Ridge Mountains and the railroad crosses the Eastern Transcontinental Divide in the Blue Ridge Tunnel which has a length of 1,865 feet. There are 55 tunnels on the route, ranging from 154 to 7,865 feet. This excellent short line railroad extends from the southern terminus, Spartanburg, South Carolina, via Marion, North Carolina to Erwin, Tennessee; and thence to the northern terminus at Elkhorn City, Kentucky.
Contributing Partner: Museum of the American Railroad
["Overland Limited" in Echo Canyon]

["Overland Limited" in Echo Canyon]

Date: c. 1928
Creator: unknown
Description: One of the nation's most famous name trains - the "Overland Limited" - train No. 1 (westbound) on Union Pacific rails in Echo Canyon, Utah. The train is headed by a Mountain, type 4-8-2 locomotive with a Vanderbilt tender (oil burner) headed by Engine No. 7038 with a consist of eleven cars, all standard heavyweight equipment. This train was a joint-operation of three rail entities: Chicago and Northwestern from Chicago to Omaha; Union Pacific from Omaha to Salt Lake City; and Southern Pacific from Salt Lake City to San Francisco and on to Los Angeles. In the "Roaring Twenties" the "Overland Limited" was the flagship of the Union Pacific's fleet.
Contributing Partner: Museum of the American Railroad
["The Owl" at Oakland, California]

["The Owl" at Oakland, California]

Date: c. 1938
Creator: unknown
Description: Southern Pacific's "The Owl" at Oakland, California depot (also designated as 16th Street) at 7:53 am enroute to San Francisco. This was a fast overnight train operating between Los Angeles and San Francisco.
Contributing Partner: Museum of the American Railroad
["The Meteor"]

["The Meteor"]

Date: c. 1910
Creator: unknown
Description: St. Louis and San Francisco Railway's oldest name train "The Meteor" operating between Chicago, St. Louis, Springfield, Sapulpa, Denison, Sherman, Fort Worth and Dallas - a rail distance of 976 miles. This famous train made its first run on March 17, 1902. Even in this early era "The Meteor" was one of the nation's de Lux long-distance passenger trains. Its dining car service was comparable to that on the Santa Fe, being under the supervision of Fred Harvey.
Contributing Partner: Museum of the American Railroad
[The "Banner Limited"]

[The "Banner Limited"]

Date: c. 1900
Creator: unknown
Description: Wabash Railway's The "Banner Limited" dating from the turn of the century, traverses the 286 mile route between St. Louis and Chicago. It was a daylight train - No. 11 southbound and No. 10 northbound - operating on a schedule of about seven hours. In this photograph the "Banner Limited" is headed by an Atlantic type 4-4-2 locomotive, engine No. 602, with a consist of old wooden cars which have underbody truss rods and open platforms. As early as June 1916, this train was cited in the Official Guide of the Railways as having modern steel equipment, comprising Smoking, Chair, Dining, and Observation cars.
Contributing Partner: Museum of the American Railroad
[First Union Pacific passenger train leaves Ft. Collins]

[First Union Pacific passenger train leaves Ft. Collins]

Date: July 15, 1911
Creator: unknown
Description: This photograph depicts one of the most eventful days in the history of Fort Collins, Colorado. The date is July 15, 1911 and the time is 7:20 am as the Union Pacific's first passenger train departs from the city. Observe the beautiful old-time steam locomotive, an American, type 4-4-0 locomotive, heading a consist of handcrafted wooden cars, having underbody truss rods and open platforms.
Contributing Partner: Museum of the American Railroad
["The California Limited"]

["The California Limited"]

Date: c. 1910
Creator: unknown
Description: Santa Fe's oldest name train - the California Limited stand in the Los Angeles California depot. This de Luxe passenger train headed by a beautiful ten wheeler, type 4-6-0 engine No. 53, with a consist of six superb passenger cars, all handcrafted wood - having open platforms and under body truss rods - has consummated its long journey - approximately 2,267 miles - requiring about 68 hours - from Chicago.
Contributing Partner: Museum of the American Railroad
[Early "California Limited" entering Los Angeles]

[Early "California Limited" entering Los Angeles]

Date: c. 1870
Creator: unknown
Description: One of the early "California Limiteds" entering the suburbs of Los Angeles, possibly dating from the late 1870's. The ten-wheeler, type 4-6-0, heading the train bears an original Santa Fe engine No. 54, indicative of ancient age. At the turn of the century the Santa Fe owned a large fleet of these locomotives: 478 ten-wheelers; these were versatile engines, known as "Jack of all Trades." However, no steam locomotives of this type were built to Santa Fe blueprints later than 1901. Observe the consist: the old weather-worn wooden railway post office car in the lead and the other open-platform wooden cars - all heated by potbellied iron stoves which burned wood or coal, and illuminated by kerosene. In this era, travel by rail had potential hazards but its popularity never waned.
Contributing Partner: Museum of the American Railroad
[Early Passenger Train in Minnesota]

[Early Passenger Train in Minnesota]

Date: January 1900
Creator: Barnes, Dwight
Description: On a winter morning in January 1900, the Great Northern Railway's passenger train stands at the Cokato, Minnesota depot. It is headed by an American type 4-4-0 locomotive bearing the Engine No. 127. This locomotive was built by the Schenectady Locomotive Works in 1882, and scrapped in 1916. Observe this burnished locomotive and its consist of clean and well-maintained equipment.
Contributing Partner: Museum of the American Railroad
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