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  Partner: Museum of the American Railroad
[Burt C. Blanton at the Depot in Erwin, Tennessee]
The author - Burt C. Blanton - stands on the open platform of the Clinchfield Railroad's Office Car No. 100, which is located on a siding adjacent to the passenger depot at Erwin, Tennessee. The time is noon, Sunday, June 10, 1979. This was a modern car with a complement of conventional equipment. The exterior was painted dark green. The cars letterboard bore the name "Clinchfield" plus the number 100 positioned on either side, centered below the windows, all in gold leaf. There was a gold stripe near the car's base, running along each side and across the rear-end platform. Office Car No. 100 was formerly an Atlantic Coast Lines dining car bearing the name "Orlando" and the car was rebuilt in the Clinchfield's Erwin Shops. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28931/
[Clinchfield's Railroad's Special Excursion train]
A survivor of the "Glory Days of Steam" - the author: Burt C. Blanton - momentarily delays departure of the Clinchfield Railroad's special excursion train wich is standing at the Marion, North Carolina Depot; scheduled to leave at 9:00 am on Sunday morning, June 10, 1979. The train is headed by the Clinchfield's passenger locomotives, No. 200, type FP-7A, and No. 800, type F-7A. The consist was eight cars. The train's route was in a northerly direction from Marion to Erwin, Tennessee - a rail distance of 82.3 miles. The Clinchfield Railroad is a typical mountain line (standard gauge) - 275 miles in length - completed on February 9, 1915, at an average cost of $201,000 per mile. It's rails traverse a portion of the Blue Ridge Mountains and the railroad crosses the Eastern Transcontinental Divide in the Blue Ridge Tunnel which has a length of 1,865 feet. There are 55 tunnels on the route, ranging from 154 to 7,865 feet. This excellent short line railroad extends from the southern terminus, Spartanburg, South Carolina, via Marion, North Carolina to Erwin, Tennessee; and thence to the northern terminus at Elkhorn City, Kentucky. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28932/
["Overland Limited" in Echo Canyon]
One of the nation's most famous name trains - the "Overland Limited" - train No. 1 (westbound) on Union Pacific rails in Echo Canyon, Utah. The train is headed by a Mountain, type 4-8-2 locomotive with a Vanderbilt tender (oil burner) headed by Engine No. 7038 with a consist of eleven cars, all standard heavyweight equipment. This train was a joint-operation of three rail entities: Chicago and Northwestern from Chicago to Omaha; Union Pacific from Omaha to Salt Lake City; and Southern Pacific from Salt Lake City to San Francisco and on to Los Angeles. In the "Roaring Twenties" the "Overland Limited" was the flagship of the Union Pacific's fleet. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28930/
["The Owl" at Oakland, California]
Southern Pacific's "The Owl" at Oakland, California depot (also designated as 16th Street) at 7:53 am enroute to San Francisco. This was a fast overnight train operating between Los Angeles and San Francisco. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28929/
["The Meteor"]
St. Louis and San Francisco Railway's oldest name train "The Meteor" operating between Chicago, St. Louis, Springfield, Sapulpa, Denison, Sherman, Fort Worth and Dallas - a rail distance of 976 miles. This famous train made its first run on March 17, 1902. Even in this early era "The Meteor" was one of the nation's de Lux long-distance passenger trains. Its dining car service was comparable to that on the Santa Fe, being under the supervision of Fred Harvey. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28927/
[The "Banner Limited"]
Wabash Railway's The "Banner Limited" dating from the turn of the century, traverses the 286 mile route between St. Louis and Chicago. It was a daylight train - No. 11 southbound and No. 10 northbound - operating on a schedule of about seven hours. In this photograph the "Banner Limited" is headed by an Atlantic type 4-4-2 locomotive, engine No. 602, with a consist of old wooden cars which have underbody truss rods and open platforms. As early as June 1916, this train was cited in the Official Guide of the Railways as having modern steel equipment, comprising Smoking, Chair, Dining, and Observation cars. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28928/
[First Union Pacific passenger train leaves Ft. Collins]
This photograph depicts one of the most eventful days in the history of Fort Collins, Colorado. The date is July 15, 1911 and the time is 7:20 am as the Union Pacific's first passenger train departs from the city. Observe the beautiful old-time steam locomotive, an American, type 4-4-0 locomotive, heading a consist of handcrafted wooden cars, having underbody truss rods and open platforms. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28925/
["The California Limited"]
Santa Fe's oldest name train - the California Limited stand in the Los Angeles California depot. This de Luxe passenger train headed by a beautiful ten wheeler, type 4-6-0 engine No. 53, with a consist of six superb passenger cars, all handcrafted wood - having open platforms and under body truss rods - has consummated its long journey - approximately 2,267 miles - requiring about 68 hours - from Chicago. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28926/
[Early "California Limited" entering Los Angeles]
One of the early "California Limiteds" entering the suburbs of Los Angeles, possibly dating from the late 1870's. The ten-wheeler, type 4-6-0, heading the train bears an original Santa Fe engine No. 54, indicative of ancient age. At the turn of the century the Santa Fe owned a large fleet of these locomotives: 478 ten-wheelers; these were versatile engines, known as "Jack of all Trades." However, no steam locomotives of this type were built to Santa Fe blueprints later than 1901. Observe the consist: the old weather-worn wooden railway post office car in the lead and the other open-platform wooden cars - all heated by potbellied iron stoves which burned wood or coal, and illuminated by kerosene. In this era, travel by rail had potential hazards but its popularity never waned. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28924/
[Early Passenger Train in Minnesota]
On a winter morning in January 1900, the Great Northern Railway's passenger train stands at the Cokato, Minnesota depot. It is headed by an American type 4-4-0 locomotive bearing the Engine No. 127. This locomotive was built by the Schenectady Locomotive Works in 1882, and scrapped in 1916. Observe this burnished locomotive and its consist of clean and well-maintained equipment. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28923/
[Maiden Run of "North Coast Limited"]
An intriguing photograph of Northern Pacific Railroad's first "North Coast Limited" which made its maiden run on April 29, 1900. The train is headed by a ten-wheeler, type 4-6-0 locomotive bearing the Engine No. 271, with a consist of eight handcrafted wooden cars - all having open platforms and underbody truss rods - heated by potbellied iron stoves and illuminated by kerosene. This was the first electrically-lighted train to operate between the Midwest and the North Pacific Coast - it also introduced such travel comforts as steam heat, baths, and barber-valet service - inaugurating the era of travel luxury on the rails. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28922/
["The Grand Canyon" in Cajon Pass]
Photograph taken in the summer of 1951. "The Grand Canyon" Santa Fe No. #3775, a 3765 Class Northern, is eastbound roaring through Cajon Pass while a freight train waits on the side. The cantilever signal was very common when the photo was taken, but now have been mostly replaced. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28921/
["The Ranger" in Ardmore, Oklahoma]
Santa Fe Railway's train No. 6 "The Ranger" northbound, departing from the Ardmore, Oklahoma depot. The city of Ardmore is in the background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28920/
["Los Angeles Limited" In Echo Canyon]
Union Pacific's "Los Angeles Limited" headed by a mountain type 4-8-2 locomotive - Engine No. 7020 with Vanderbuilt tender and a consist of nine cars stands on the siding in Echo Canyon, Utah. "Pusher" locomotive in the rear. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28919/
["Los Angeles Limited" in Cheyenne, Wyoming]
Photograph of one of the Union Pacific Railroad's most famous passenger trains - the "Los Angeles Limited" headed by an Atlantic type 4-4-2 locomotive, Engine No. 116 as it passes through Cheyenne, Wyoming. The train consisted of seven handcrafted wooden cars - heated by potbellied iron stoves and illuminated by kerosene lamps. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28918/
["Yankee Clipper" in Forest Hills, Mass]
The New Haven Railroad's "Yankee Clipper" headed by Engine No. 1396 - a Pacific type 4-6-2 locomotive, enroute through Forest Hills, Massachusetts, on June 11, 1934. Operating between Boston and New York on a 4-hour and 45-minute schedule, this All-Pullman train comprised Club car, two Parlor cars, Dining car, and Sun Parlor Observation car. The "Yankee Clipper" rolled over the New Haven's main line rails - between Grand Central station (New York) and Back Bay, South Station (Boston) - a rail distance of 229.5 miles - at an average speed of 51 miles per hour. This was an excellent schedule for the era. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28917/
[Ferry Barge and Passenger Train in New Orleans]
Southern Pacific's ferry barge "Mastodon" - with accompanying tug boats - awaits passenger train moving aboard to be ferried across the Mississippi River at New Orleans, Louisiana. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28916/
[Ferry Barge and Passenger Train in New Orleans]
Southern Pacific's ferry barge, the "Mastodon" with passenger train aboard, is taken in tow by tugboats for the crossing of the Mississippi River at New Orleans. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28915/
["Sunset Limited" crossing the Mississippi River]
Southern Pacific's "Sunset Limited" train No. 1 westbound, aboard the ferry barge "Mastodon" accompanied by Engine No.73, a steam switcher, type 0-6-0, with a slope-backed tender - is being ferried across the Mississippi River from New Orleans to Avondale, Louisiana. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28914/
["C.P. Huntington" locomotive]
Southern Pacific's No. 1 locomotive - the C.P. Huntington - type 4-2-4T, built in the shops of Danforth, Cooke and Company of Paterson, New Jersey, in 1863. This diminutive steam engine was the first to cross the Huey P. Long Bridge spanning the Mississippi River during opening ceremonies on December 16, 1935. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28913/
["The Hustler" arriving in Shreveport, Louisana]
Known in the Pelican State as the Louisiana and Arkansas Railway's "The Hustler," train No. 4-203, northbound, arriving in Shreveport, Louisiana from New Orleans on an April morning in 1939. The small Pacific, type 4-6-3 locomotive, which heads this passenger train, carries the train's name etched on a metal plate attached to the boiler front, positioned below the headlight. These overnight trains - operating between New Orleans and Shreveport were popular over a long span of years, making the approximate 329.4 mile run in about 10 hours. A portion of the route was over Louisiana and Arkansas rails and also over Louisiana Railway and Navigation company's rails. This subsidiary of the Kansas city Southern Lines was known as the "Edenborn Line". texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28912/
["The West Virginian" in the Blue Ridge Mountains]
One of the Chesapeake and Ohio;s excellent passenger trains "The West Virginian" train No. 1 westbound, traversing main line rails through the Blue Ridge Mountains. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28911/
["North Coast Limited" departing from St. Paul, Minnesota]
The Northern Pacific's de Luxe "North Coast Limited" westbound, headed by engine No. 2671, a Northern type 4-8-4, locomotive departing from the St. Paul Union Station in 1941. This beautiful engine was among the last steam locomotives to power the famous train prior to "dieselization". texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28910/
["North Coast Limited" in Livingston, Montana]
Northern Pacific Railway's "North Coast Limited" headed by Engine No. 2608, class A, Northern, type 4-8-4 locomotive, makes a station stop at Livingston, Montana. This was a Northern Pacific train from Seattle to St. Paul and a Chicago, Burlington, and Quincy train from St. Paul to Chicago. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28909/
["The Sportsman" in White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia]
Chesapeake and Ohio's "The Sportsman" headed by Engine No. 491, a Pacific type 4-6-2 locomotive, awaits the departure signal at the White Sulpher Springs, West Virginia Depot. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28908/
[Chicago and Western Indiana Railroad's suburban passenger train]
This photograph depicts one of the Chicago and Western Indiana Railroad's suburban passenger trains departing from 64th Street Station Chicago. The train is headed by Engine No. 210 - a Prairie type 2-6-2 locomotive, with a consist of five standard heavyweight passenger coaches. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28907/
[Chicago and Western Indiana Railroad's coach yard]
Aerial view of the Chicago and Western Indiana Railroad's fabulous 51st Street coach yard and facilities in Chicago. At this time the destruction of the nation's great network of rail passenger service was only about two years away. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28906/
[Chicago "Pay-Car"]
This photograph portrays an unusual rail consist: Chicago and Western Indiana Railroad's Engine No. 202, a 2-6-2 type heading the "pay-car" in Chicago. In this era the railroad's tracks were being elevated throughout the metropolitan area. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28905/
[Dearborn Station]
Dearborn Station, completed and opened to service in 1885, was owned by the Chicago and Western Indiana Railroad Company, together with its five owner companies. The station's main floor and mezzanine waiting rooms were completely modernized in 1947. This modernization program included the Fred Harvey operated restaurant and cocktail lounge. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28904/
[Long Island Railroad train]
The Long Island Railroad's train No. 529 westbound, headed by a class G5s ten wheeler, type 4-6-0 locomotive, enroute through Glen Cove from Oyster Bay to Jamaica. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28903/
["St. Louis Special" departing Chicago]
Illinois Central Railroad's "St. Louis Special" train No. 1-501, headed by Engine No. 2450 - a mountain type 4-8-2 locomotive, departing from the Central Station in Chicago. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28902/
["The Pennsylvainia Limited" westbound]
This scene became commonplace by 1929 - Pennsy passenger trains headed by famed K4s Pacifics on first-class passenger runs - because the Atlantics had been retired. In this view, "The Pennsylvania Limited" train No. 5 westbound, headed by a K4s Pacific, type 4-6-2 locomotive, Engine No. 5375 rolls on the high iron at more than a mile a minute with ten cars of standard varnish. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28901/
[Mail-Express train in Pennsylvania]
One of the Pennsylvania Railroad's Mail-Express trains, headed by a K4s locomotive with a standard coach on the rear-end, rolls through the Pennsylvania countryside on a cold, dismal day in January 1923. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28900/
[Mighty Engine No. 1361 of the Pennsylvania Railroad]
Pennsylvania Railroad's mighty and versatile Engine No. 1361, a K4s Pacific type 4-6-2 locomotive, was one of the earliest built in the shops at Altoona, Pennsylvania. This locomotive was placed in service May 18, 1918 and hauled passenger trains on the main line between New York, Harrisburg, and Pittsburgh over a period of thirty-five years. It rolled up a total of 2,469,000 miles before retirement. It now reposes at the famous Horseshoe Curve as a permanent monument. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28899/
[Pennsy's Horseshoe Curve]
This photograph depicts the most famous stretch of railroad main line in the world as it appeared in the autumn of 1951- the Pennsy's Horseshoe Curve, located in Kittanning Gap in Pennsylvania. In this scene a Pennsylvania K4s locomotive acts as a "helper" on the head-end of a diesel powered train. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28898/
[Pennsy's Horseshoe Curve]
Photograph of a train passing between mountains near a lake. Characterized as one of the most fantastic scenes on any railroad - this is the Pennsylvania's Horseshoe Curve shortly after sunrise on a spring morning in 1954. This was the centennial year of Horse Shoe Curve, which was built in 1854. The Mountain in the background in the center of the Curve is Kittaning Mountain. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28897/
["The Montrealer" near Montreal]
Photograph of one of America's most unique passenger trains. Depicted in this photograph is the "Montrealer" train No. 21, northbound, on the last portion of its journey near Montreal, Canada. The famous old name train - headed by a C,ational's Engine No. 231 - a Pacific type 4-6-2 locomotive with a consist of five standard heavyweight cats - was om service for a number of decades. "The Montrealer" was a Pennsylvania train from Washington D.C. to New York; a New Haven train from New York to Springfield; a Boston train from Springfield to White River Junction; and a Canadian National train from White River Junction to Montreal. The rail distance was 669.7 miles. Over a span of years "The Montrealer" departed from Washington at 4:00 pm and arrived in Montreal at 8:55 am. This schedule was equivalent to an average running time of about 40 miles per hour. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28896/
[Santa Fe's "Queen of the Rails"]
Photograph of Santa Fe's "Queen of the Rails" - the "California Limited" train No. 4 eastbound, headed by Engine No. 2928 - a Northern type 4-8-4 locomotive, and a consist of fourteen standard heavyweight cars- crosses the Canyon Diablo Bridge near Winslow, Arizona. Observe this locomotive's automatic-type, elevating smokestack, designed to increase the up-draft, thereby increasing combustion efficiency in the firebox. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28895/
[Chicago and North Western Railway's passenger station]
This photograph depicts one of the nations finest railroad passenger stations - Chicago and North Western Railway's Chicago passenger station. Sign above the station says" Streamliners, North Western, Union Pacific" texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28894/
[Interior of Chicago and North Western Railway station]
A typical rush hour scene in the magnificent Chicago Station of the Chicago and North Western Railway. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28893/
[Suburban-bound trains at Chicago Station]
The Chicago and North Western Railway - spanning a period of many years - always operated the largest fleer of commuter trains into and out of the "Windy City". This scene portrays seven suburban-bound trains which have departed from the Chicago Station. The city of Chicago is in the background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28892/
[Steam engines retired at Chicago Passenger Station]
In the closing years of the "Glory Days of Steam" the Chicago and North Western Railway's work horses stand at track ends in the Chicago passenger station. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28891/
[E-4 Streamliners in Chicago]
The Chicago and North Western Railway's E-4 type streamliners, which headed the "Overland Limited" and "Challenger" trains between Chicago and the West Coast, stand in the Chicago Passenger Station. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28890/
[Pacific steam engine leaving the Chicago station]
Most of the Chicago and North Western Railway's fleet of passenger trains traveled behind Pacifics like No. 2911, seen here leaving the Chicago station in 1939. The city of Chicago is in the background of this photo. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28889/
[Passengers boarding the "Twin Cities 400"]
On a snowy night in December 1947, passengers are boarding the Chicago and North Western's "Twin Cities 400" streamliner at the Chicago Station. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28888/
[Blizzard in the Chicago Station]
One of the most unique of all railroad photographs: It is a January night in 1958 and a blizzard-snowstorm rages in the "Windy City". This scene is in the yards - the Chicago and North Western Railway's Chicago passenger station is visible in the background. Observe the gas jets which are keeping switches from being frozen. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28887/
["The Bluebonnet" departs from Dallas]
It's a typical summer day in Texas and the year is 1950. The Katy's "The Bluebonnet" train No. 7 southbound, headed by a beautiful Pacific type 4-6-2 locomotive, with a consist of eight standard heavyweight passenger cars - departs from Dallas on its lengthy run to San Antonio. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28886/
[Lounge car on "The Bluebonnet" ]
Interior view of the Parlor Lounge Car in the consist of the Katy's "The Bluebonnet" train No. 7 southbound enroute from Dallas to San Antonio, Texas. This beautiful parlor lounge was a standard heavyweight car. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28885/
[Advent of the Streamliners]
This photograph portrays the dawn of a new era in railroading - advent of the streamliners in the late 1930s and early 1940s, plus modernization of the " Age of Steam" streamlining steam motive power. The splendor of Southern Pacific's "The Sunbeam" is shown. This train went into service between Dallas and Houston on September 15, 1937 - traversing the rail distance: 265 miles in 265 minutes. The consist of eight lightweight cars is headed by Engine No. 652, a Pacific type 4-6-2 streamlined steam locomotive with disc drivers, air horn and equipped with a Vanderbuilt tender (an oil burner). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28884/
["Sunbeam" train leaving Dallas]
In an era of rapid transit in Texas the Southern Pacific's advertisements cited the "Sunbeam" trains - modern streamliners - as the apex in luxury and speed between Dallas and Houston - an elapsed time of four hours and twenty-five minutes. This view portrays the "Sunbeam" train No. 14 southbound headed by Engine No. 651 - a streamlined Pacific type 4-6-2 locomotive - rolling out of Dallas Union Station, enroute to Houston on the afternoon of October 5, 1952. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28883/
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