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  Partner: Marshall Public Library
 Decade: 1970-1979
[Audrey Kariel and Charles Spangler Celebrate Opening of Marshall Public Library]
Mrs. Audrey D. Kariel, Project Coordinator, and Martin Spangler, Chairman, celebrate the new Marshall Public Library at the formal reception on October 20, 1973. Mrs. Kariel relates "Martin was an inspirational leader. Every agenda carried a quote with motivation. My favorite was 'Your ship cannot come in unless you send some out.' We had to send out many ships to build the new MPL." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17684/
[Belle Crockett, Marshall Centenarian]
Mrs. Belle Crockett was 106 years old, confined to a wheelchair, and in a Marshall nursing home when she posed for this picture in the home's reception area, c1976. A daughter of former slaves, she spent her active life working in her home and on the farm. Married twice, she did not have children. Her birth and death dates are unknown. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18082/
[Bicentennial Library Exhibit About Native Americans]
During the United States' Bicentennial, an exhibit at Marshall Public Library about Native Americans was called "Alien In His Own Land." It featured some 120 rare portraits, biographies, document reproductions, watercolor paintings, a map, and movie posters . Some pictures were of notables such as Pocahontas, and others featured Native American costume, manners, and customs. In 1976, it was still politically acceptable to call Native Americans "Indians," a term which the article and photo caption favors. The woman in the slide photo is Mrs. Dorothy Morrison, library director. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17500/
[Bill Moyers and Fan]
Bill Moyers, national journalist and Marshall favorite son, visits with a fan after his speech. He returned to Marshall, Texas, during the nation's Bicentennial celebration in 1976 to speak on the value of libraries in a community. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18765/
[Bookmobile]
The new bookmobile at Marshall Public Library, c. 1978, is readied for use by two helpers (unidentified). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17538/
[Bookmobile for Marshall Public Library]
In 1978 the Marshall Public Library received a 28-foot mobile home to be refurbished as a bookmobile. Library Director Dorothy Morrison is shown discussing the project with Mike Wood, left, Friends of a Public Library president, and Fenn Lewis, Friends fund drive chairman. The Friends organisation gave the bookmobile as a service to both the city and Harrison County. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17682/
[Celebrants at the Dedication of the New Marshall Public Library]
Audry D. Kariel, Library Building Project Coordinator, with friend Janice Levy and Rabbi Richard Zionst at the dedication of the new Marshall Public Library building on October 21, 1973. Rabbi Zionst gave the invocation at the dedication ceremony, a choice which reflected the amount of financial support and hard work invested by the Marshall Jewish community in the new building. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17677/
[Celebrants at the reception for the new Marshall Public Library]
Mr. George Olincy, Chairman of the Andrew Norman Foundation, and Mrs. Bernice Gold Kranson were benefactors of the new Marshall Public Library building in 1973. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17571/
[Celebrating a Library's Opening]
Two young women, both library supporters, attended the reception celebrating the opening of Marshall's new library building in October, 1973. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18802/
[Celebrating the Opening of Marshall Public Library]
Celebrating at the October 20, 1973 reception for the opening of the new public library building in Marshall, Texas are Mr. and Mrs. Louis Kariel (left and right) and Tony Bridge (center). Mr. Bridge was the owner of KMHT radio station and was the first person to support Mrs. Kariel when she publicly stated the need for a public library. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17584/
[Children Help to Move Library]
When the Marshall Public Library was founded, it had its first home at the corner of West Austin and Franklin streets (now the Chamber of Commerce building). Books from a lending library belonging to Marshall Women's Clubs became the core of the new collection. Approximately 25 children helped to move this core collection from its old home at 112 East Austin St. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17521/
[Children's Storytime at the Library]
Children's storytime at Marshall Public Library usually includes a story with crafts or music. In 1978 the story was occasionally presented by slides, filmstrip, or 16mm film, if licensing permitted. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17602/
[Civic leaders at the Marshall Public Library Opening Reception]
Civic leader Carolyn Abney and her mother attended the formal reception for the opening of Marshall Public Library in 1973. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17509/
[Class Meets at Library]
A career education class meets in the Gold Auditorium at Marshall Public Library. The auditorium was equipped with the latest audio-visual technology when the library was built in 1973. This class, meeting in 1978, made use of that technology shown in the picture. The auditorium has been in demand almost continuously for many purposes since the library was built. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17611/
[Dorothy Vance Montgomery]
Dorothy Vance Montgomery, musician and educator in Marshall, Texas. Born and reared in Marshall, she received several undergraduate and graduate degrees from Wiley College and the University of Southern California. She taught music in the Marshall Public Schools, 1930-1976. She also taught piano for 44 years at her private studio; was minister of music for 17 years at New Bethel Baptist Church; and was adjunct teacher for 2 years at Wiley College. The image shows her receiving one of several local awards for her long contribution to education. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18174/
[Downtown Street Scene, Marshall]
As the sign attests, N. Wellington Street runs one way to the south in Marshall. The street intersects with Houston (right foreground) after crossing W. Austin Street one block to the north. Businesses located along the section of N. Wellington shown in the picture would have included the Marshall National Bank motor branch, Birmingham Shopping Mart, Paxtons Appliances, Blairs TV Service, River's Seed Bin, McKay's Furniture Co., City Finance So., and Denney Cleaners. Along W. Austin Street right to left, were Marshall Barber Shop, Mays Studio, the Blalock Building, Joe Woods Radio & TV Service, Stacy Shoe Repair, Blue Bonnet Beauty Shop, Desota Imports-Exports, Austin Furniture Co., McGibbon Watch Repairing, Barkett Shoe Repairing, Parish Taxi Stand, and finally Marshall Public Library at the extreme left side of the picture. The picture likely dates from 1978 or later. The blue Oldsmobile vehicle on the left is a 1978 model. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18111/
[End of Summer Reading Program at the Library]
In 1979 the summer reading program at the Marshall Public Library ended with a picnic and outdoor games. Here the children line up for one of the activities. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18759/
[Flag Presentation]
The first flag to fly over the new Marshall Public Library was flown over the Capitol before being presented to the library by the Ladies Auxiliary of the VFW Post 3969. The gift was made possible by Congressman Sam B. Hall of Harrison County. Three members of the Army National Guard are shown raising the colors at the formal presentation ceremony. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17513/
[Friends of a Public Library Gives Bookmobile to the City of Marshall]
Marshall, Texas, Mayor William Huffman (center) accepts the keys to the new bookmobile from Dr. A. F. Veau, (right), president of the Friends of a Public Library as City Manager Ray Jackson (left) looks on. In the background, W.C. Wallace, bookmobile driver, supervises a tour of the vehicle. Caption and photo from the Marshall News Messenger newspaper, Wednesday, April 12, 1978. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17683/
[Friends of the Library Inspect the New Bookmobile]
Lou Gaw, left, and Audrey Kariel, right, inspect the Marshall Public Library's new bookmobile. The Friends of a Public Library group acquired a motor home for the purpose. It was refurbished and re-constructed inside for library books. It was ready for use by April, 1978. According to the caption, Hallsville was the first stop on the schedule. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17499/
[Grant Aids New Library Building]
In September, 1971, a challenge grant from the Andrew Norman Foundation was offered to the Friends of a Public Library in Marshall, Texas for the purpose of building a new library. The $150,000 offer was to be matched by funds raised in Marshall and Harrison County. Following a successful fund drive, the photo shows George Fenn Lewis, president of the Friends, endorsing a balance payment check for $110,000 before presenting it to Dick Brassell, secretary-treasurer of the Friends. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17572/
[Jaycee Jaynes Benefit Library and Hospital]
In 1972, the local chapter of the Jaycee Jaynes held a game night to benefit the building funds for the Marshall Public Library and Marshall Memorial Hospital. Seated left to right, Mrs. Tom Wynn, Mrs. John Carrington, and Mrs. Kenneth White confer about door prizes. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18753/
[Library Benefactors at a Library Function]
Library benefactors Virginia Gold Olinsky, second from left, and Bernice Gold Kranson, right, are shown with other library supporters at a reception during the opening weekend of the Marshall Public Library, October, 1973. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17493/
[Library Benefactors at Marshall Opening]
Library benefactors greet other library supporters at the reception for the new Marshall Public Library on October 20, 1973. Third from left is Mrs. George Gold Olincy, then her sister Mrs. Bernice Gold Kranson, fourth from left, and then Mr. George Olincy, right. The Mose and Etta Gold auditorium at the library was named for the Gold's parents. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18777/
[Library Circulation Desk Staff]
Two library staff members, unidentified, discuss business at Marshall Public Library's circulation desk in 1978. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17537/
[Library Director Dorothy Morrison with a Small Patron]
Dorothy Morrison, early director of the Marshall Public Library, shows a toy to a young patron during the Christmas season. The library is shown festively decorated for the holidays. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17535/
[Library Display Honors the Nation's Bicentennial]
Mrs. Dorothy Morrison, Marshall Public Library Director, presents a display to honor the nation's Bicentennial in 1976. The Liberty Bell replica was donated to the library by Marshall National Bank on July 1, 1976. The librarian holds a copy of the Declaration of Independence. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17492/
[Library Display Showcases Liberty]
Mrs. Dorothy Morrison, Marshall Public Library Director, shows off a display about Liberty. In the center of the display is a replica of the Liberty Bell, given by Marshall National Bank in 1976. Mrs. Morrison holds a reproduction of a liberty document. Books, small flags and a model cannon round out the display. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17687/
[Library Student Worker]
A student worker (name unknown) assists with book processing in the workroom of Marshall Public Library. The library is one of the locations used to place students from a local university's work-study program. This liason benefits the library by expanding its personnel. The students' duties include shelving, book processing, and assisting with storytime. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17643/
[Library Supporter Earns Accolades]
Mrs. Audrey Kariel, who was Project Director for the building of the new Marshall Public Library in 1973, holds a plaque awarded for her work. The event occured in the library's Gold auditorium on its opening weekend, October 20, 1973. Mrs. Kariel said the plaque was "A suprise [for her] - recognizing her work to make the MPL's dream come true." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17690/
[Library Supporter Speaks Persuasively for New Library]
Don Harper, library supporter, presents a persuasive speech to convince the public of the need for a new public library building. According to the caption, he emphasized, "Now, not later, is the time to act." The new library in Marshall, Texas opened October, 1973. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18761/
[Library Supporters]
Dr. Rutledge McClaran of Marshall, Texas is pictured in a newspaper photo with a fellow library supporter, Mrs. Warren F. Keyes. Both served as presidents of the local Friends of a Public Library organization during the group's early years. Mrs. Keyes was also a member of the women's clubs which owned the private lending library which predated the Marshall Public Library. She successfully advocated for a public library. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18762/
[Library Supporters at Gala Reception for Library Opening]
Fenn Lewis, center, Mrs. George (Virginia Gold) Olincy to his right, and Mrs. Audrey Kariel, to his left, chat at the reception to celebrate the opening of the new Marshall Public Library in October, 1973. These three were key constituents in the drive to get the library constructed. Others in the picture are unidentified. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17488/
[Library Supporters Pose at Library Opening]
Audrey Kariel, Project Director, and Carolyn Abney, civic leader and library supporter, pose at the reception for the grand opening of new Marshall Public Library October 20, 1973. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18803/
[Library Supporters, Ray and Mona Lawson]
Ray and Mona Lawson, library suppporters, attended the reception for the opening of Marshall Public Library on October 20, 1973. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17507/
[Library Volunteer at Her Duties]
Margie was a volunteer at Marshall Public Library in 1978. Here she assists at the circulation desk. Volunteers donated countless hours to the library during its early years. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17574/
[Marshall, an All-America City]
During the nation's celebration of its Bicentennial, certain cities around the country received a designation as "All-America City." Marshall, Texas was one such city. In this newspaper photo from the Marshall News Messenger, Chamber of Commerce president Tony Bridge displays the All-America City plaque and makes the announcement through radio and television microphones shown in foreground. Unidentified dignitaries stand behind him. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17588/
[Marshall Hotel, Marshall]
The multi-story Marshall Hotel is a landmark in downtown Marshall. It is located on E. Houston Street. The corner shown is E. Houston and Lafayette. The building to the left of the hotel is the Mahon Building, was an office building at the time of the picture, c1970. After many years of standing empty and neglected, the hotel is currently under restoration. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18086/
[Marshall Library Supporter Displays Dedication Program]
In 1973 the Marshall Public Library received the "Library Project of the Year" award from the Texas State Library Association. The dedication ceremony for the new library was held on Sunday, October 21, 1973. At a reception on the Saturday night before, Nancy Kariel displays the dedication program. The program cover shows the artist's rendering of the architect's concept. Inside is the history of the drive from 1969-1972 to construct a new library; the order of ceremony; lists of officers, boards, and committees; and two pages recognizing the individuals and organizations which contributed substantially to the project. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17491/
[Marshall Public Library Building Project Coordinator]
Mrs. Audrey Kariel, Project Coordinator, stands in front of the wall plaque giving recognition to the founders of the new Marshall Public Library building, which opened in 1973. Mrs. Kariel also served as chairwoman of the library Board of Trustees and was an organizer of the Friends of a Public Library group that was instrumental in building the library. She dedicated seven years to making the library a reality. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17669/
[Marshall Public Library Staff at Work]
Mrs. Naomi Rhea, Marshall Public Library staff member, works on book processing. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18766/
[New Flag for a New Library]
Members of the Army National Guard raise the new flag in front of the new Marshall Public Library at formal presentation ceremonies. The flag previously flew over the Capitol, and was a gift arranged by Congressman Sam B. Hall, Jr. through the Ladies Auxiliary of VFW Post 3969. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17581/
[Night View of the New Marshall Public Library in 1973]
Night view of the new Marshall Public Library in 1973. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17489/
[Oldest Nursing Home Resident, Mrs. Izoria Malone]
Mrs. Izoria Malone was listed as 113 years old on records at the Harrison County Nursing Home when she was admitted there on January 29, 1974. She was possibly the second oldest resident in a United States nursing home at that time, and was certainly the oldest in the county. She died June, 1976 at the of 115. Article from The Marshall News Messenger newspaper, no date, reprinted in book, The Black Citizen and Democracy: Black Culture in Harrison County, Past, Present, and Future. Marshall Public Library, 1976, p. 86. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18142/
[Opening Marshall's First McDonald's]
At the grand opening of the first McDonald's in Marshall, Texas, Mrs. Audrey Kariel performed the traditional ribbon-cutting ceremony as McDonald's officials, John Gehl and Gerald Stiles, look on. Attached to the ribbon were 100 one dollar bills, which were presented to Mrs. Kariel as a donation to the Marshall Public Library building fund. Mrs. Kariel was a member of the library board of trustees and a director of the Friends of a Public Library group that spear-headed the fund drive. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17594/
[Opening of Marshall's First McDonald's]
Audrey Kariel performs the ribbon-cutting for the first McDonald's in Marshall, Texas on October 20, 1972. The ribbon held 100 one-dollar bills which were donated to the building fund for the new Marshall Public Library, which opened one year later. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18780/
[Patron Checks Out Art Prints]
Jane Harris, library assistant, checks out one of Marshall Public Library's art prints to a patron (unidentified). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17629/
[Picnic at the Library]
The end of the summer reading program in 1979 included a picnic for the children on the grounds of Marshall Public Library. A staff person (unidentified) serves punch to the children. The menu also included sandwiches and cookies for hungry eaters in grades one through six. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18770/
[Program Features Bill Moyers at the Marshall Public Library]
Bill Moyers waits to be introduced at a Marshall Public Library program during the nation's Bicentennial in 1976. Mr. Moyers, a favorite son of Marshall, Texas, returned to speak about the value of libraries to democracy. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17536/
[Reception for Bill Moyers at the Marshall Public Library]
Bill Moyers, second from left, talks with Harrison County residents who attended his speech at the Marshall Public Library during the United States Bicentennial in 1976. Mr. Moyers spoke on the value of libraries to democracy. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17577/
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