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  Partner: Marshall Public Library
[Ward Chapel AME Church in Marshall]

[Ward Chapel AME Church in Marshall]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: View of Ward Chapel AME Church in Marshall, Texas. AME is the African Methodist Episcopal denomination. The church is located at 501 S. Allen Street in the historic "New Town" neighborhood.
Contributing Partner: Marshall Public Library
[St. Paul Baptist Church in Marshall]

[St. Paul Baptist Church in Marshall]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: View of St. Paul Baptist Church in Marshall, Texas. Organized in 1881, the congregation has traditionally African-American roots. The church is located on Texas Highway 43 northeast of the city.
Contributing Partner: Marshall Public Library
[Historic Home, Marshall, Texas]

[Historic Home, Marshall, Texas]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: Marshall, Texas has many Victorian-era homes still in existence. Some are in good condition, others are being restored.
Contributing Partner: Marshall Public Library
[New Harrison County Courthouse]

[New Harrison County Courthouse]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The new Harrison County courthouse, built in 1964, is on the west side of the downtown square. On the far right of the image is the registered Arnot House.
Contributing Partner: Marshall Public Library
[Cottage in New Town Neighborhood, Marshall, Texas]

[Cottage in New Town Neighborhood, Marshall, Texas]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The New Town neighborhood in Marshall, Texas was a self-sufficient African-American community containing schools, stores, churches, a college, and many bungalows and cottages. This cottage is typical of the neighborhood. New Town has been selected as a model for preservation under Marshall's Historic Preservation Action Plan.
Contributing Partner: Marshall Public Library
[African-American Church, Harrison County]

[African-American Church, Harrison County]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: A historic African-American church in Harrison County. An unidentified man stands in the foreground.
Contributing Partner: Marshall Public Library
[Joseph House in Marshall]

[Joseph House in Marshall]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The home of Mack C. and Frankie Joseph was located at 1403 Grafton St. in Marshall. Joseph began a floral business in the home about 1949. By 1951 he had moved the business next door to number 1405. The city directory of 1966 lists only Frankie Joseph as the resident of the home, while 1405 is still the floral shop. The 1968 directory has a new resident; and number 1405 is vacant. In the 2000 directory, neither address is listed; but a street has been cut through. These buildings were located within the "New Town Neighborhood," which is a historic area of African-American homes, businesses, professional offices, hospital, and schools that were established around Wiley College. Although overlaid with faux masonry siding at the time of the picture (1967-1975), this house shows its architectural origins in the roof design, porch with columns, and exposed rafters.
Contributing Partner: Marshall Public Library
[Old Harrison County Courthouse]

[Old Harrison County Courthouse]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: This building is the old Harrison County Courthouse, the fourth one to serve as the seat of county government and the centerpiece of Marshall. Designed by architect J. Riely Gordon, it was erected in 1900. It has a cruciform plan with an embellished rotunda. Exterior embellishments include pedimented porticoes, pilasters with capitals, and a dramatic dome with eagles and a statue of Lady Justice. In 1926, an addition was constructed. A 21st century renovation has restored the building to its 1926 condition. It will continue its existence as the seat of county government and a museum.
Contributing Partner: Marshall Public Library
[Bethesda Baptist Church, Marshall]

[Bethesda Baptist Church, Marshall]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: An old photograph, date unknown but likely prior to 1897, depicts Bethesda Baptist Church of Marshall. Originally known as "Colored Baptist Church," the members renamed it about 1887 and then added the word "Missionary" during the 1980's to make the official name "Bethesda Missionary Baptist Church." Bethesda is one of the oldest African-American congregations in Harrison County, being founded in 1867 by 450 souls led by Rev. William Massey with the assistance of Rev. A. E. Clemmons, the pastor of the white First Baptist Church. The members met in Rev. Massey's home at 601 Massey St. until the construction of this one-story wooden structure, probably between 1867 and 1875. The plan included a veranda leading to the vestibule, three aisles, and colored glass in the arched Gothic windows. There was an organ, the first in Marshall, and a belfry. Outside facilities included a baptistry and a well. During 1897-1901, this structure was razed and replaced by a larger brick structure of Gothic style which later burned and was itself replaced. However the front facade of the wooden structure was incorporated into the new buildings as a link with the past. The site at 801 W. Grand (Hwy 80) has been ...
Contributing Partner: Marshall Public Library
[James Chapel, Harrison County]

[James Chapel, Harrison County]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: James Chapel in Harrison County has traditional African-American roots. It is located at 4233 Marshall Leigh Road (CR 2200) a short distance northeast of the city limits.
Contributing Partner: Marshall Public Library