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  Partner: Marshall Public Library
[College Faculty, Marshall]
This page came from a yearbook, either Bishop College or Wiley College in Marshall. The words designate that photos are of college faculty. The teachers and the name "Haggard" are unidentified. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18037/
[Community Leader]
An unidentified man was recognized in this Marshall newspaper article. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18779/
[Community Leader and Educator, Marshall]
An unidentified African-American educator is photographed in his office in Marshall. The telephone, other furnishings, and his clothing suggest a time during the first part of the twentieth century. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17720/
[Community Leader and Library Supporter]
A man, unidentified, was a Marshall Public Library supporter and community leader. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18806/
[Continental Trailways Depot, Marshall]
The Continental Trailways Bus Line served Marshall from the mid-1950s through the late 1980s, when the franchise passed to the Greyhound Bus Company. The depot was built during the mid 1960s. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18103/
[Continental Trailways Depot, Marshall]
Continental Trailways gave intercity bus service to Marshall from the mid-1950s until the late 1980s, when the franchise passed into the ownership of Greyhound Bus Lines. This depot, built during the mid-1960s, is located at 201 S. Bolivar Street in the downtown area. The picture likely dates from that time. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18112/
[Continental Trailways Depot, Marshall]
At the time of this photo in the late 1960s, Continental Trailways provided intercity bus service to Marshall. The depot was built approximately 1965. Greyhound Bus Company acquired the franchise during the late 1980s, and has continued to serve Marshall until the present day. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18102/
[Continental Trailways in Marshall]
Continental Trailways bus station was located at 201 S. Bolivar St. in downtown Marshall. It is now owned by Greyhound Lines Inc. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17887/
[Continental Trailways in Marshall]
The bus station at 201 S. Bolivar St. near downtown Marshall was once owned by the Continental Trailways Bus Company. It is now owned by Greyhound Lines Inc. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17891/
[Corinth Baptist Church, Harrison County]
Corinth Baptist Church is in Harrison County. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17734/
[Cottage in New Town Neighborhood, Marshall, Texas]
The New Town neighborhood in Marshall, Texas was a self-sufficient African-American community containing schools, stores, churches, a college, and many bungalows and cottages. This cottage is typical of the neighborhood. New Town has been selected as a model for preservation under Marshall's Historic Preservation Action Plan. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18165/
[Crafts Class]
Unidentified African-American students in a crafts class display their handiwork. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18136/
[Dave Beachum]
An African-American man in Harrison County, Dave Beachum. He was an educator in the Marshall area. Mr. Beachum was married to Emmaline Leffall. She was the daughter of Calvin and Mariah Leffall (former slaves who settled in Elysian Fields slightly outside of Marshall). The Leffall family has been in the Marshall area since the late 1870's texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17819/
[Decorating a Grave in Harrison County]
Photograph of an unidentified woman placeing flowers at the headstone for two graves in a Harrison County cemetery. In the center background there appears to be a small structure. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17895/
[Display at Marshall Public Library]
A display area at Marshall Public Library, Marshall, has an art print which could be circulated; and a violin which was used by local musician Charles R. Aber. Mr. Aber also had a large collection of audio tapes which his mother donated to the library after his death. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17573/
[Donation to Library]
Many individuals and groups donated to the building fund for the new Marshall Public Library from 1969-1973. In this newspaper photo, Tommy Thomas of a local veterans group presents a check to a member (unidentified) of the Friends of a Public Library, which spearheaded the movement for the library. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17587/
[Donation Toward New Library]
Martin Spangler, chairman of the drive to build a new Marshall Public Library, accepts a check from Glenda Liston. Almost every club and organization in Marshall, Texas contributed to this fund drive. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17671/
[Donor Presents Gift to New Library]
A man and a woman, both unidentified, were instrumental in donating a gift toward the building of the new Marshall Public Library, which was completed in 1973. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18757/
[Dorothy Morrison, First Director of Marshall Public Library]
An early library logo depects Mrs. Dorothy Morrison, first director of Marshall Public Library, 1970-1984. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17487/
[Dorothy Morrison, First Director of the Marshall Public Library]
Mrs. Dorothy Morrison was director of the new Marshall Public Library from 1970 to 1984. She was responsible for several innovations at the library. The newspaper-on-microfilm collection is named in her memory. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17555/
[Dorothy Vance Montgomery]
Dorothy Vance Montgomery, musician and educator in Marshall, Texas. Born and reared in Marshall, she received several undergraduate and graduate degrees from Wiley College and the University of Southern California. She taught music in the Marshall Public Schools, 1930-1976. She also taught piano for 44 years at her private studio; was minister of music for 17 years at New Bethel Baptist Church; and was adjunct teacher for 2 years at Wiley College. The image shows her receiving one of several local awards for her long contribution to education. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18174/
[Downtown Marshall]
A view of N. Washington Street (center) at the intersections with E. Houston (foreground) and W. Austin (left center) streets in Marshall during the mid-1960s. At the time of the picture, N. Washington was the commercial center or "main street" of the city. Together with W. Austin street, they form the northeast corner of the square where the historic county courthouse is located. The First National Bank is shown at the extreme right in the picture; it fronts on E. Houston. Across N. Washington where it intersects with W. Austin, Pelz Jewelry has a corner entrance. Continuing to the left on W. Austin are Security Finance Corp., Bert Jackson Jeweler, and Sharkey Tailoring. Looking down the west side of N. Washington past Pelz Jewelry are Matthewson Drug Co., McLellan Store, and the historic J. Weisman & Co. department store. Other stores are too distant to be identified. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18119/
[Downtown Street Scene, Marshall]
As the sign attests, N. Wellington Street runs one way to the south in Marshall. The street intersects with Houston (right foreground) after crossing W. Austin Street one block to the north. Businesses located along the section of N. Wellington shown in the picture would have included the Marshall National Bank motor branch, Birmingham Shopping Mart, Paxtons Appliances, Blairs TV Service, River's Seed Bin, McKay's Furniture Co., City Finance So., and Denney Cleaners. Along W. Austin Street right to left, were Marshall Barber Shop, Mays Studio, the Blalock Building, Joe Woods Radio & TV Service, Stacy Shoe Repair, Blue Bonnet Beauty Shop, Desota Imports-Exports, Austin Furniture Co., McGibbon Watch Repairing, Barkett Shoe Repairing, Parish Taxi Stand, and finally Marshall Public Library at the extreme left side of the picture. The picture likely dates from 1978 or later. The blue Oldsmobile vehicle on the left is a 1978 model. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18111/
[Downtown Street Scene, Marshall]
Marshall's N. Wellington Street (center) intersects with Houston (foreground), then crosses W. Austin Street on its way north. Businesses shown on N. Wellington during the late 1960s included Tip Top Cleaners, Blair's TV Service, Marshall National Bank Motor Branch, Rives Seed Bin, McKay's Furniture Co., City Finance Co., and Denney Cleaners. From right to left on W. Austin, one can see Marshall Barber Shop, Mays Studio, Blue Bonnet Beauty Shop, Joe Woods Radio & TV Service and Stacy Shoe Repair Shop. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18114/
[Dr. A. F. Veau, Marshall Public Library Supporter]
Dr. A. F. Veau was a member of the executive board of the Friends of a Public Library in Marshall, Texas. In 1978 he was installed as the president of the Friends group. He had also been active in promoting the new library building, which opened in 1973. For many years he kept scrapbooks that detailed the history of the establishment and progress of the library as well as the Friends. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17582/
[Dr. Bill Burns and Friend]
Dr. Bill Burns discusses matters with an unidentified man. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17689/
[Dr. C. W. Kerry, Marshall]
Dr. C. W. Kerry was featured in this newsletter or program. He came to Marshall to address a Pemberton group. The date and other identification are unknown. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17966/
[Dr. Christine B. Cash, East Texas Educator]
Dr. Christine Benton (Mrs. Larry B.) Cash was an educator in the northeast Texas region. She was born August 9, 1887 in Jefferson, into a family of girls who all became educators. After completing her early education in Marion County public schools, she earned the BA degree from Bishop College (Marshall) in 1926. The Bishop yearbook picture in this entry is from that year. In 1943 she received the Master degree from Atlanta University, and in 1947 the PhD from the University of Wisconsin. Dr. Cash taught all levels, beginning with a one-room school in Jefferson. She organized a high school in Camp County, serving as principal before becoming the superintendent. She taught at Bishop College and Jarvis Christian College. Dr. Cash taught a total of 65 years. She appeared in Who's Who in Colored America and Who's Who in the South and Southwest. As a scholar, she did research and published. She lived in Marshall after retirement. She is buried in the New Zion Baptist Church Cemetery in Jefferson, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17711/
[Dr. Ernest S. Rambo, Community Leader]
Dr. Ernest S. Rambo was featured in this article from the Marshall News Messenger newspaper. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17482/
[Dr. Everett H. Leach, Harrison County Physician]
Dr. Everett H. Leach, early African-American physician, was born in Marshall in 1879 or 1881 (tombstone date). He entered Bishop College at age twelve. He received his medical degree from Flynt Medical College in New Orleans. Later he studied at Illinois Post-Graduate School in Chicago. He settled in the rural Leigh community east of Marshall, where he built a practice, erected a drug store and office, and owned two farms. Later he moved to Marshall and commuted to Leigh by automobile. According to his tombstone, he died March 31, 1946, and was buried in the Powder Mill Cemetery on FM 1997, Marshall. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18044/
[Dr. Everett H. Leach, Harrison County Physician]
Dr. Everett H. Leach, African-American physician, was born in Marshall in 1879 or 1881 (tombstone date). He entered Bishop College at age twelve. He received his medical degree from Flynt Medical College in New Orleans. Later he studied at Illinois Post-Graduate School in Chicago. He settled in the rural Leigh community east of Marshall, where he built a practice, erected a drug store and office, and owned two farms. Later he moved to Marshall and commuted to Leigh by automobile. According to his tombstone, he died March 31, 1946. He was interred in the Powder Mill Cemetery on FM 1997 in north Marshall. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18150/
[Dr. Everett H. Leach, Harrison County Physician]
Dr. Everett H. Leach, African-American physician, was born in Marshall in 1879 or 1881 (tombstone date). He entered Bishop College at age twelve. He received his medical degree from Flynt Medical College in New Orleans. Later he studied at Illinois Post-Graduate School in Chicago. He settled in the rural Leigh community east of Marshall, where he built a practice, erected a drug store and office, and owned two farms. Later he moved to Marshall and commuted to Leigh by automobile. According to his tombstone, he died March 31, 1946. He was buried in the Powder Mill Cemetery on FM 1997 in north Marshall. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18151/
[Dr. G. T. Coleman Home in Marshall]
This bungalow in Marshall, possibly Craftsman in its original form, has several later additions. It is located at 606 Sanford Street in the "New Town Neighborhood," a historic African-American community that developed around Wiley College from 1910-1950. The home was the residence of Dr. George T. Coleman. The physician also had a structure across the street at 607 Sanford that he used as a hospital for his patients. Some of his patients went to the Sheppard-Watts Sanitarium on S. Carter Street. Dr. Coleman's office was located first on W. Houston and later on S. Wellington. According to Dr. Coleman's obituary, he was born in Ft. Worth to Mr. and Mrs. P. Coleman. He received his early education in El Paso. He completed his college and professional training in Illiinois. In 1910 he moved to Marshall and began a practice that lasted 53 years. He performed numerous professional, church and civic duties; but notable was his involvement in establishing the first tuberculosis hospital in Kerrville. His first wife, Edith, died in 1949. He later married Willia, a union which lasted until his passing on June 10, 1963. He is presumed to be buried in the Powder Mill Cemetery, in a plot with a Coleman family marker having no individual names or dates. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18106/
[Dr. H. D. Bruce, Educator and Library Supporter]
Dr. H. D. Bruce of East Texas Baptist College was a supporter of the drive to build a new public library in Marshall, as this article explains. The new building was completed in 1973. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17480/
[Dr. James R. Sheppard, Marshall Physician]
Dr. James R. Sheppard was an African-American physician who established a hospital in Marshall in 1925. It was located at 606 S. Carter St. in the historic New Town Neighborhood in the western part of the city. It was called the Sheppard Sanitarium on the Sanborn Maps. Later the hospital was purchased by Dr. Williams Watts and renamed the Sheppard-Watts Hospital. Nothing more is known about Dr. Sheppard. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18015/
[Dr. Joseph J. Rhoads, President of Bishop College]
Dr. Joseph J. Rhoads was an educator, administrator, and advocate for civil rights in education who completed his career as the first African-American president of Bishop College in Marshall. He was born in 1890 in Marshall, and was educated there. He received his first degree from Bishop College; his second degree from the University of Michigan; and a Lit. D. degree from Bishop College. He also did graduate work at Yale University, receiving a scholarship there. He held numerous positions as teacher and school administrator from Texas to Alabama before being appointed to the presidency of Bishop in 1929. He led Bishop to its first accreditation by the Texas Dept. of Education and other major accrediting associations. During his tenure, Dr. Rhoads discontinued Bishop's high school department, opened a junior college campus in Dallas, and affiliated with the United Negro College Fund. He also organized the Lacy Kirk Williams Ministers' Institute, a short-term training center for inservice ministers and laity. He consistently advocated for racial equality in education through the offices he held in numerous organizations. Dr. Rhoads died in 1951, and was buried in the McJohnson Cemetery in Marshall. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17978/
[Dr. M. W. Dogan, Wiley College President]
Dr. Matthew Winfred Dogan was a Marshall educator who became president of Wiley University (now Wiley College) in 1896 and served in that office for more than 45 years. M. W. Dogan Elementary School in Marshall was named for him. Dr. Dogan was born December 21, 1863 in Pontotoc, Mississippi, to William and Jennie Dogan. His parents purchased their own and their children's freedom from slavery through frugality and hard work; so that Matthew Winfred was born free. He earned his education from first grade through graduation from college by working as a bootblack in his father's barbershop. In 1886 he received his A.B. degree in mathematics from Rust University, where he was noted for his high scholarship and his logical mind. After three years on the faculty at Rust, he was called to a mathematics professorship at Central Tennessee College (later Walden College). Success there led to his appointment to the Wiley presidency, being only the second African-American to attain that office. During his tenure there were numerous achievements: a building program which produced five buildings; a new Carnegie library; other building and landscaping improvements; expanded course offerings; new degree programs in law, nursing, and theology; lengthening the school term; eliminating the old grammar and secondary schools with a name change; offering the Ph.D. degree; affiliation of fraternal and sororal organizations; increases in enrollment from many states and foreign countries; and changes in the financial foundation. In 1888 he married Fannie Forrest Faulkner, also a teacher. They were the parents of seven children. She died on June 16, 1929. Dr. Dogan is buried in the Wiley College Cemetery in Marshall. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18007/
[Dr. M. W. Dogan, Wiley College President]
Dr. Matthew Winfred Dogan was a Marshall educator who became president of Wiley University (now Wiley College) in 1896 and served in that office for more than 45 years. M. W. Dogan Elementary School in Marshall was named for him. Dr. Dogan was born December 21, 1863 in Pontotoc, Mississippi, to William and Jennie Dogan. His parents purchased their own and their children's freedom from slavery through frugality and hard work; so that Matthew Winfred was born free. He earned his education from first grade through graduation from college by working as a bootblack in his father's barbershop. In 1886 he received his A.B. degree in mathematics from Rust University, where he was noted for his high scholarship and his logical mind. After three years on the faculty at Rust, he was called to a mathematics professorship at Central Tennessee College (later Walden College). Success there led to his appointment to the Wiley presidency, becoming only the second African-American to attain that office. In 1888 he married Fannie Forrest Faulkner, also a teacher. They were the parents of seven children. She died on June 16, 1929. The article surrounding the photograph describes the occasion on which Dr. Dogan was honored for his long tenure. The event was a convocation in the Wiley College chapel, June 2, 1941. Methodist Bishops, educators from other colleges, ministers, and the Wiley Board of Trustees spoke of his meritorious service. In addition, there were testimonials in letters and telegrams from state governors, college presidents, and others. Dr. Dogan is buried in the Wiley College Cemetery in Marshall. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17974/
[Dr. Nolan H. Anderson, Marshall Physician]
Dr. Nolan Hamilton Anderson was a physician in Marshall who established the University Medical Clinic on University Ave. in Marshall. He was also one of the founders of the Harrison County Nursing Home. Born Nov. 8, 1910, he died in August, 1977. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17965/
[Dr. O. L. Bledsoe, Marshall Physician]
Dr. Ovid L. Bledsoe of Marshall is featured in this clipping from a newspaper, newsletter, or program. A physician, he practiced medicine in Marshall for 33 years. The Bledsoe name is prominent in local African-American history. The doctor was born between 1886 and 1888 to Rev. W. F. Bledsoe, a minister and successful businessman in Marshall. The young Ovid graduated from Bishop College in 1908 and then from Meharry Medical College in 1912. He returned to Marshall to practice the rest of his life. His office was located on the Northwest Public Square. He also joined with Dr. G. T. Coleman and Dr. F. E. Williams to establish a clinic on Sanford Street. He married Letta Carey, who taught at Bishop College, in 1917. They were parents of two children Zeta and Ovid L., Jr. The family home was at 703 W. Grand Ave. Letta died in 1931, and in 1943 the doctor married Mary Elizabeth Watson, the librarian at Bishop College. The entire Bledsoe family was active in church and civic affairs; but most particularly they supported Bishop College. Dr. O. L. Bledsoe died February 21, 1945. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17815/
[Dr. O. L. Bledsoe, Marshall Physician]
Dr. Ovid. L. Bledsoe was a physician in Marshall for 33 years. Born between 1886 and 1888, he was the son of Rev. W. F. Bledsoe, minister and successful businessman, also of Marshall. The young Ovid graduated from Bishop College in 1908 and then from Meharry Medical College in 1912. He returned to Marshall to practice the rest of his life. His office was located on the Northwest Public Square. He also joined with Dr. G. T. Colman and Dr. F. E. Williams to establish a clinic on Sanford Street. He married Letta Carey, who taught at Bishop College, in 1917. They were parents of two children, Zeta and Ovid L., Jr. The family home was at 703 W. Grand Ave. After Letta's death in 1931, the doctor remained single until marrying Mary Elizabeth Watson in 1943. She was a librarian at Bishop College. The entire Bledsoe family was active in church and civic affairs; but most particularly they supported Bishop College. Dr. O. L. Bledsoe died February 21, 1945. The picture may be from a program or the Bishop College yearbook. The word "medical" is printed above the photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17961/
[Dr. O. W. Phillips, Marshall Dentist]
Dr. Oliver Wendell Phillips, Sr. was a dentist in Marshall in the first half of the twentieth century. He was born in Harrison County, date unknown. He graduated from the Bishop College academic department (high school). In 1921 he received the Doctor of Dental Surgery Degree from Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee. He received a Bachelor of Science degree from Bishop College in the same year. His wife was Miss Mayme Adams, and they bore two children. He was active in the historic Bethesda Baptist Church. He supported Bishop College throughout his life, even to serving as college dentist. He was also on the dental staff of the T&P Railroad Company for many years. In addition, he had a private practice. His office was located at 111 1/2 W. Houston Street. Dr. Phillips died September 16, 1955. He is buried in the Powder Mill Cemetery. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18011/
[Dr. Rubye Jones, Dallas Educator]
Dr. Rubye Jo Williams Jones taught sociology at S.M.U in Dallas. She was reared in Marshall, the daughter of Milton and Rubye Adams Williams. She graduated from Pemberton High School, following with a B. S. degree in sociology (alma mater unknown). She then attended graduate school at T.W.U., working as a graduate assistant. She earned her PhD. there and then joined the S.M.U. faculty. She was featured in this newspaper clipping, date unknown. In the picture she wears a mortarboard and an academic robe with hood. She is married to Kenneth C. G. Jones, also of Marshall. They live in Dallas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17970/
[Dr. T. L. Hunter, Marshall Dentist]
Dr. Thomas L. Hunter was a dentist who came to Marshall in 1917 and practiced there more than 50 years. Born around 1884 in Navasota, Texas, he was educated at Prairie View College and Meharry Medical College. He was active in church, charitable, and civic organizations. He was honored by Meharry, the National Dental Association, and Wiley College for his contributions to dentistry and to education. He died November 14, 1969, and was buried in the Rose Hill Garden Cemetery. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18000/
[Dr. Theopolus Caviness Makes an Address in Marshall]
Dr. Theopolus Caviness prepares to give an address during a visit to Marshall. The event and date are unknown. He is wearing the traditional doctor's academic robes. A microphone dangles in front of his tie. Dr. Caviness is married to Jimmie Pitts Caviness, singer and vocal teacher, who also has an entry in the Texas History Portal. The Caviness couple lived in Cleveland, Ohio at the time of this picture, c1970-1984. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18147/
[D. E. Williams, Marshall Educator]
Mrs. D. E. Williams taught English at an African-American high school in Marshall. No other information about her is available. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18012/
[Early Audio Equipment at Marshall Public Library]
A view of the audio equipment which was current when Marshall Public Library was built in 1973. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17653/
[Early Grave in Harrison County]
An old tombstone in Harrison County is engraved "Mother Bessie." A cherub's head with wings adorns the stone. The cemetery is unidentified. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18156/
[East Texas Oil Museum, Kilgore]
An oil derrick stands in front of the East Texas Oil Museum. Located on the Kilgore College campus at Hwy 259 and Ross St, it commemorates the discovery of oil in East Texas in 1930. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18087/
[Ebenezer Baptist Church in Harrison County]
Ebenezer Baptist church is located four miles northwest of Marshall on Hwy 154. Ebenezer has a traditonally African-American congregation. It was organized in 1897. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17839/