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  Partner: Marshall Public Library
[Boston A. Russell, Marshall Educator]
The Pemberton High School yearbook photograph of band director Boston A. Russell. The yearbook date may be from 1950-53 or 1964. No information is available about Mr. Russell. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18042/
[Boy Races at the Games Day]
An unidentified young boy races across the grass at a picnic and games day which concluded the summer reading program at Marshall Public Library, c1976. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17607/
[Buard's Phillips 66 Service Station in Marshall]
Buard's Phillips 66 Service Station in Marshall was located at 1301 University where it intersects with Sanford Street. Therefore it was located within the historic "New Town Neighborhood," which is an African-American community of homes, businesses, professional offices, schools, and churches grouped around the Wiley College campus. The owner of the station, Polete Buard, was a self-made businessman. He was born and educated in Marshall. In 1929 he married Rebecca Drayden, whose biography is in the Texas History Portal. Buard first worked for the Texas and Pacific Railroad in the freight office. After retiring in 1970, he began operation of this service station, which he had purchased earlier. He was also active in his church and the Masonic Lodge. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18110/
[Building in Marshall]
An unidentified building in Marshall may be a church building. The picture does not show the whole structure. There is an awning over double front doors. A shed extension is at one side. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17804/
[Building in Marshall]
An unidentified brick building in Marshall. There are three exterior doors on the ground floor with large windows on either side. Three windows on the upper floor align with the doors. Larger windows are on each end. The building sits alone on a low rise, with steps leading through a lawn to the front entrance. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17885/
[Building in Marshall]
Unidentified building in Marshall. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17758/
[Bungalow in Marshall]
This unidentified bungalow in Marshall has the Craftsman architecture, with the decorative brackets and exposed rafter ends under the eaves, and the trio of small windows in the front-facing gable which covers a porch supported by square half-columns set on brick piers. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18126/
[Bungalow in Marshall]
An unidentified bungalow in Marshall. The architecture is craftsman, with the front-facing gable, simple brackets, and columns set on brick piers. The house was occupied, clearly by someone who enjoyed plants. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18141/
[Bungalow in Marshall]
An unidentified bungalow in Marshall. A three-story brick building is at the left of the picture. Steps lead from the sidewalk up a small rise. The wrought iron columns at the front porch may be a change from the original style and period of the house. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17884/
[Business in Marshall]
The Record Hut is the sign on this business in Marshall. The address is 512 1/2 S. Carter St. The location is within the New Town Neighborhood, which is a historic African-American community in west Marshall. The building is a small flat-roofed concrete block structure with grilles over the doors and an ice machine outside. The sign also has the words, "Tapes" and "Head Shop." A name on the sign is almost obscured by glare, but appears to be J. W. Fry. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17876/
[Business in Marshall]
The "End Zone" was a business in Marshall, location unknown. It was a small one-story building that stood alone on the lot. It had two entrance doors and large windows. On a boarded window are the words, "Private for Members Only Guests Welcome." A picture is attached to another boarded window. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17889/
[Business in Marshall]
A barber shop in Marshall is in a one-story brick building with large windows, a side-gable roof, and a gable over the front steps. Moon's Laundry and Cleaners is visible at the right edge of the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17787/
[C. F. Adams, School Superintendent]
Chesley Francis Adams was both city and county superintendent of schools in Marshall and Harrison County. He was born July 24, 1856 to Chesley M. Adams, a lawyer who came originally from North Carolina, and Martha Stephens Adams. Adams' early education was in Marshall. He received Bachelor degrees from Emory and Henry College in Virginia. Returning to Marshall, he read law and was admitted to the bar. Before entering practice, he taught school for two years. Elected to the office of school superintendent in 1890, he dedicated the rest of his career to city and county schools. Most of the schools at the turn of the century were built during his administration. He is known to have appointed H. B. Pemberton to the position of principal at the new Central School, which was the first public African-American school in the city. In 1891, Adams married Alice C. Stuart, daughter of the president of the Marshall Masonic Female Institute. Mrs. Stuart was a teacher there. Chesley and Alice had three children. The Adams are buried in the old Marshall City Cemetery. He died in 1940. This Marshall News Messenger newspaper photo shows him standing in front of a frame building. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17765/
[C. H. and Mrs. Maxon, Bishop College, Marshall]
C. H. Maxon was the fifth president of Bishop College in Marshall during the early years of the twentieth century. He is pictured with Mrs. Maxon. He was appointed by the American Baptist Home Missionary Society that founded the college. As all of the first presidents, he was a white man administering a school for African-American students. Bishop College received its first African-American president in 1929 with the appointment of Dr. J. J. Rhoads. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17969/
[Capitol Hotel, Marshall]
The Capitol Hotel in Marshall existed from 1857 to 1971 at the corner of Houston and Bolivar Streets in Marshall. It was predated by the Adkins House and was succeeded by the Hotel Marshall, which still stands. The Capitol was financed by George A. Adkins and built by two slaves, Dick Land and Green Hill. The hotel had a colorful history due to the momentous times of the Civil War and visits by noted Texans. After the Hotel Marshall was built next door, owner Sam Perkins bought the Capitol and made it an annex of the larger hotel. The Capitol was razed in 1971. A historical marker on the lawn west of the Hotel Marshall records the hotel's history. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17759/
[Capitol Hotel, Marshall]
The Capitol Hotel stood from 1857 to 1971 at the corner of Houston and Bolivar Streets in Marshall. It was predated by the Adkins House and was succeeded by the Hotel Marshall, which still stands. It was financed by George Adkins and built by two slaves, Dick Land and Green Hill. These expert masons made the bricks that went into the 12-inch walls of the five-story structure. The hotel had a colorful history. It was the scene of important Confederate meetings during the Civil War. Noted Texans, actors, and other VIPS visited there - including the notorious. After the Hotel Marshall was built, owner Sam Perkins bought the Capitol and made it an annex of the larger hotel. The Capitol was razed in 1971. A historical marker on the lawn west of the Hotel Marshall notes the hotel's history. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17776/
[Carmina Fuller, Marshall Educator]
Miss Carmina Fuller taught English in Marshall. Facts about her life and career are unknown. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18027/
[Carnegie Library at Wiley College, Marshall]
This Carnegie Library was located at Wiley College in Marshall. It was built with a $15,000 grant obtained in 1907 by Dr. M. W. Dogan, a president of the college. In 1967 it was replaced by a more modern library. An interior view shows the reading area and stacks. The building has been preserved and is now the Wiley College Administration building. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17809/
[Carnegie Library at Wiley College, Marshall]
The Carnegie Library in Marshall was located at Wiley College. It was built with a $15,000 grant obtained in 1907 by Dr. M. W. Dogan, a president of the college. In 1967 it was replaced by a more modern library. An interior view shows the reading area and stacks. The building has been preserved and is now the Wiley College Administration building. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17818/
[Carrie B. Reid Thompson, Marshall Educator]
Mrs. Carrie B. Reid Thompson taught language arts courses at Pemberton High School in Marshall. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17835/
[Celebrants at Reception for Library Opening]
Festivities at the grand opening of the new Marshall Public Library in October, 1973 included a dinner for all of those who worked on the project. The only persons identified here are Mrs. George Olincy, second from left; Mrs. Bernice Gold Kranson, center; and Mr. George Olincy, fourth from left. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18752/
[Celebrating Marshall's Bicentennial]
Two Marshallites present "Uncle Sam" to celebrate Marshall's designation as an All-America City during the nation's bicentennial celebration in 1976. At left is Connie Ware. The woman at right is unidentified. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17484/
[Cemetery Care, Harrison County]
Mr. Tim Brown takes care of an unidentified cemetery in Harrison County. His name is on the reverse of the photograph, but not the name of the cemetery. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17831/
[Cemetery Cleanup]
Tim Brown helps with cleanup at one of the African-American cemeteries in Harrison County. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18013/
[Cemetery Cleanup, Harrison County]
Brush is piled to one side as it is cleared away from the graves in this cemetery cleanup. The cemetery, unidentified, is in Harrison County. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17833/
[Cemetery Cleanup, Marshall]
Powder Mill Cemetery on FM 1997 in Marshall is a traditionally African-American site. It had become overgrown when a group organized to clean it up. Here a pile of brush shows how much was being accomplished. Vehicles are visible at right behind the brushpile. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18818/
[Cemetery Cleanup, Marshall]
The Powder Mill Cemetery in Marshall was receiving a cleanup at the time of this picture, c1984. The cemetery is located on FM 1997. It is a traditionally African-American site. A unidentified man with his back to the camera is seen at left. In the center is a box truck pulling a utility trailer with a chipper on it. In foreground the graves which have already been cleared are visible. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18820/
[Cemetery Cleanup, Marshall]
The Powder Mill Cemetery in Marshall was an overgrown woodland site when a group organized to rescue it. The picture shows the cleanup effort. Piles of posts are in the center. A truck with ladders on the side pulls a utility trailer with a chipper on it. A man feeds brush into the chipper. Two other men work in the distance. None are identified. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18822/
[Cemetery, Harrison County]
This woodland cemetery in Harrison County is unidentified. Headstones are visible above the right center of the scene. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17830/
[Cemetery in Harrison County]
Photograph of some unidentified graves in Harrison County. Behind a row of stones with slabs is a group with a cyclone fence around them, as if a family site. Most of the graves are decorated with flowers or crosses. The cemetery is unidentified. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17697/
[Cemetery in Harrison County]
Photograph of an unidentified cemetery in Harrison County. There are two rows of graves in a wooded setting. The bottom row has no stones. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17699/
[Cemetery in Harrison County]
Photograph of an unidentified wooded cemetery in Harrison County. Several stones are visible, with flowers for decoration. The stones are considerably weathered. All have slabs. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17812/
[Cemetery in Harrison County]
An unidentified cemetery in Harrison County has old stones and newer ones. The site is traditonally African-American. Houses can be seen in the distance at left. The site has mature trees. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17845/
[Cemetery in Harrison County]
A cemetery in Harrison County is unidentified. The site is maintained and is traditionally African-American. At the left side there is a red brick wall with a stone near the base. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17811/
[Cemetery in Harrison County]
An unidentified cemetery in Harrison County. It is known to be a traditionally African-American site. A cyclone fence is in the foreground. Rows of slabs are decorated with flowers and plants. Headstones can be seen in the distance. The cemetery appears to be neatly trimmed and has mature trees to create a park-like setting. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17832/
[Cemetery in Harrison County]
A cemetery in Harrison County has traditionally African-American use. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17860/
[Cemetery in Harrison County]
A view of an African-American cemetery in Harrison County. It may be the Nichols cemetery in a neighborhood on the east side of Marshall. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18070/
[Cemetery in Harrison County]
Photograph of an unidentified cemetery in Harrison County. The site is overgrown. Some of the graves have been decorated. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17745/
[Cemetery in Harrison County]
An unidentified cemetery in Harrison County. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17995/
[Center Hill FWB Church in Harrison County]
Center Free Will Baptist Church is located on Center Hill Rd. (CR 4210) in the community of Nesbitt in Harrison County. The congregation has traditionally African-American roots. It was organized in 1887 in the center of a hill, hence the name. After the first church burned, Center Hill moved nearby. The present white frame structure was built in 1956. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17854/
[Central High School, Marshall]
Central High School was located on a hill at the conjunction of Railroad Ave. (now Alamo), Border St. (now Travis), and Fannin St in Marshall. It was built by Prof. H. B. Pemberton, using his own funds which were repaid by donations. It was the first public school for African-Americans in the city. In the beginning all grade levels were there. When elementary schools were built, those grades moved and Central became a high school. Later the high school moved to a new campus on Wiley Ave. (Rosborough Springs Rd.) The old building was torn down and the hill leveled. Today a historic marker stands on the site. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17828/
[Central School, Marshall]
Central School was the first public school in Harrison County for African-American children. It was located on a hill bounded by Railroad Ave. (now Alamo), Border St. (now Travis), and Fannin St. Founded by H. B. Pemberton, who was also its first principal, the school was later named for him. In early years the campus housed all grades; but when elementary schools were built, Central/Pemberton became a high school. When the school moved across town to a new site, the old buildings were razed and the hill levelled. A historical marker now commemorates the school. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17754/
[Central School, Marshall]
Central School was the first public school for African-American children in Harrison County. The building and its outbuildings were located on a hill bounded by Railroad Ave. (now Alamo), Border St. (now Travis), and Fannin. The buildings were torn down and the hill leveled after the school moved to another location. A historical marker notes the location. Central was renamed Pemberton after H. B. Pemberton, who was its founder and first principal. In the early years the elementary grades were included. After schools for those grades were built elsewhere, Central/Pemberton became a high school only. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17773/
[Charles R. Aber's Violin]
The violin displayed on the library's cabinet, center, was played by local musician-of-note Charles R. Aber. Mr. Aber also had a considerable collection of music tapes which his mother donated to the Marshall Public Library following his death. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17651/
[Cheerleaders]
A group of African-American cheerleaders, unidentified, posed for this photograph, possibly for their yearbook. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18148/
[Child Races at the Picnic]
A small boy races toward a finish line as other children wait their turn. An adult appears to stand in the right foreground. The event was a picnic and games day which concluded the summer reading program at Marshall Public Library, c1976. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17616/
[Child Tearfully Receives a Prize]
A girl cries as she receives a stuffed toy prize at the conclusion of Marshall Public Library's summer reading program, c1976. The child and a library volunteer stand on the stage in the library's Gold auditorium. The child and adult are unidentified. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17614/
[Children at a Library Picnic]
Children enjoy a picnic provided by Marshall Public Library at the conclusion of the summer reading program, c1976. The event was held on the library grounds and included traditional games such as races. Children and adults (background) in the picture are unidentified. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17605/
[Children at Play]
A group of African-American children play a jumprope game. Five girls and two boys are in the group. A man and woman at the left, and a woman at the right look on. One girl holds the rope, while another at the left runs to jump into the game. The person at the other end of the rope is not visible. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18146/
[Children Gather at the Library]
Children gather at the public library for reading activities. Since its beginning, Marshall Public Library has offered storytimes and summer reading programs to its youngest patrons. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18783/