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  Partner: Marshall Public Library
[Celebrants at the reception for the new Marshall Public Library]
Mr. George Olincy, Chairman of the Andrew Norman Foundation, and Mrs. Bernice Gold Kranson were benefactors of the new Marshall Public Library building in 1973. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17571/
[Celebrating a Library's Opening]
Two young women, both library supporters, attended the reception celebrating the opening of Marshall's new library building in October, 1973. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18802/
[Celebrating Marshall's Bicentennial]
Two Marshallites present "Uncle Sam" to celebrate Marshall's designation as an All-America City during the nation's bicentennial celebration in 1976. At left is Connie Ware. The woman at right is unidentified. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17484/
[Celebrating the Opening of Marshall Public Library]
Celebrating at the October 20, 1973 reception for the opening of the new public library building in Marshall, Texas are Mr. and Mrs. Louis Kariel (left and right) and Tony Bridge (center). Mr. Bridge was the owner of KMHT radio station and was the first person to support Mrs. Kariel when she publicly stated the need for a public library. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17584/
[Celebration Dinner for Supporters of a New Library]
Supporters who worked to realize a dream for a new Marshall Public Library were honored at a celebration dinner on October 19, 1973, two days before the official opening of the building. George Olincy, chairman of the Andrew Norman Foundation, speaks to the group at the Holiday Inn Motel. The Foundation gave a challenge grant to the Friends of a Public Library. Originally the offer was for $125, 000, but it grew to $175,000. To the right in the picture is Fenn Lewis, who chaired the successful fund drive for the Friends. Others are unidentified. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17663/
[Cemetery Care, Harrison County]
Mr. Tim Brown takes care of an unidentified cemetery in Harrison County. His name is on the reverse of the photograph, but not the name of the cemetery. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17831/
[Cemetery Cleanup]
Tim Brown helps with cleanup at one of the African-American cemeteries in Harrison County. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18013/
[Cemetery Cleanup, Harrison County]
Brush is piled to one side as it is cleared away from the graves in this cemetery cleanup. The cemetery, unidentified, is in Harrison County. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17833/
[Cemetery Cleanup, Marshall]
The Powder Mill Cemetery in Marshall was receiving a cleanup at the time of this picture, c1984. The cemetery is located on FM 1997. It is a traditionally African-American site. A unidentified man with his back to the camera is seen at left. In the center is a box truck pulling a utility trailer with a chipper on it. In foreground the graves which have already been cleared are visible. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18820/
[Cemetery Cleanup, Marshall]
The Powder Mill Cemetery in Marshall was an overgrown woodland site when a group organized to rescue it. The picture shows the cleanup effort. Piles of posts are in the center. A truck with ladders on the side pulls a utility trailer with a chipper on it. A man feeds brush into the chipper. Two other men work in the distance. None are identified. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18822/
[Cemetery Cleanup, Marshall]
Powder Mill Cemetery on FM 1997 in Marshall is a traditionally African-American site. It had become overgrown when a group organized to clean it up. Here a pile of brush shows how much was being accomplished. Vehicles are visible at right behind the brushpile. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18818/
[Cemetery, Harrison County]
This woodland cemetery in Harrison County is unidentified. Headstones are visible above the right center of the scene. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17830/
[Cemetery in Harrison County]
Photograph of an unidentified wooded cemetery in Harrison County. Several stones are visible, with flowers for decoration. The stones are considerably weathered. All have slabs. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17812/
[Cemetery in Harrison County]
An unidentified cemetery in Harrison County. It is known to be a traditionally African-American site. A cyclone fence is in the foreground. Rows of slabs are decorated with flowers and plants. Headstones can be seen in the distance. The cemetery appears to be neatly trimmed and has mature trees to create a park-like setting. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17832/
[Cemetery in Harrison County]
A cemetery in Harrison County has traditionally African-American use. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17860/
[Cemetery in Harrison County]
Photograph of an unidentified cemetery in Harrison County. The site is overgrown. Some of the graves have been decorated. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17745/
[Cemetery in Harrison County]
A view of an African-American cemetery in Harrison County. It may be the Nichols cemetery in a neighborhood on the east side of Marshall. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18070/
[Cemetery in Harrison County]
An unidentified cemetery in Harrison County. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17995/
[Cemetery in Harrison County]
A cemetery in Harrison County is unidentified. The site is maintained and is traditionally African-American. At the left side there is a red brick wall with a stone near the base. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17811/
[Cemetery in Harrison County]
An unidentified cemetery in Harrison County has old stones and newer ones. The site is traditonally African-American. Houses can be seen in the distance at left. The site has mature trees. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17845/
[Cemetery in Harrison County]
Photograph of an unidentified cemetery in Harrison County. There are two rows of graves in a wooded setting. The bottom row has no stones. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17699/
[Cemetery in Harrison County]
Photograph of some unidentified graves in Harrison County. Behind a row of stones with slabs is a group with a cyclone fence around them, as if a family site. Most of the graves are decorated with flowers or crosses. The cemetery is unidentified. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17697/
[Center Hill FWB Church in Harrison County]
Center Free Will Baptist Church is located on Center Hill Rd. (CR 4210) in the community of Nesbitt in Harrison County. The congregation has traditionally African-American roots. It was organized in 1887 in the center of a hill, hence the name. After the first church burned, Center Hill moved nearby. The present white frame structure was built in 1956. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17854/
[Central High School, Marshall]
Central High School was located on a hill at the conjunction of Railroad Ave. (now Alamo), Border St. (now Travis), and Fannin St in Marshall. It was built by Prof. H. B. Pemberton, using his own funds which were repaid by donations. It was the first public school for African-Americans in the city. In the beginning all grade levels were there. When elementary schools were built, those grades moved and Central became a high school. Later the high school moved to a new campus on Wiley Ave. (Rosborough Springs Rd.) The old building was torn down and the hill leveled. Today a historic marker stands on the site. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17828/
[Central School, Marshall]
Central School was the first public school in Harrison County for African-American children. It was located on a hill bounded by Railroad Ave. (now Alamo), Border St. (now Travis), and Fannin St. Founded by H. B. Pemberton, who was also its first principal, the school was later named for him. In early years the campus housed all grades; but when elementary schools were built, Central/Pemberton became a high school. When the school moved across town to a new site, the old buildings were razed and the hill levelled. A historical marker now commemorates the school. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17754/
[Central School, Marshall]
Central School was the first public school for African-American children in Harrison County. The building and its outbuildings were located on a hill bounded by Railroad Ave. (now Alamo), Border St. (now Travis), and Fannin. The buildings were torn down and the hill leveled after the school moved to another location. A historical marker notes the location. Central was renamed Pemberton after H. B. Pemberton, who was its founder and first principal. In the early years the elementary grades were included. After schools for those grades were built elsewhere, Central/Pemberton became a high school only. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17773/
[Charles R. Aber's Violin]
The violin displayed on the library's cabinet, center, was played by local musician-of-note Charles R. Aber. Mr. Aber also had a considerable collection of music tapes which his mother donated to the Marshall Public Library following his death. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17651/
[Cheerleaders]
A group of African-American cheerleaders, unidentified, posed for this photograph, possibly for their yearbook. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18148/
[Child Races at the Picnic]
A small boy races toward a finish line as other children wait their turn. An adult appears to stand in the right foreground. The event was a picnic and games day which concluded the summer reading program at Marshall Public Library, c1976. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17616/
[Child Tearfully Receives a Prize]
A girl cries as she receives a stuffed toy prize at the conclusion of Marshall Public Library's summer reading program, c1976. The child and a library volunteer stand on the stage in the library's Gold auditorium. The child and adult are unidentified. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17614/
[Children at a Library Picnic]
Children enjoy a picnic provided by Marshall Public Library at the conclusion of the summer reading program, c1976. The event was held on the library grounds and included traditional games such as races. Children and adults (background) in the picture are unidentified. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17605/
[Children at Play]
A group of African-American children play a jumprope game. Five girls and two boys are in the group. A man and woman at the left, and a woman at the right look on. One girl holds the rope, while another at the left runs to jump into the game. The person at the other end of the rope is not visible. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18146/
[Children Gather at the Library]
Children gather at the public library for reading activities. Since its beginning, Marshall Public Library has offered storytimes and summer reading programs to its youngest patrons. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18783/
[Children Help to Move Library]
When the Marshall Public Library was founded, it had its first home at the corner of West Austin and Franklin streets (now the Chamber of Commerce building). Books from a lending library belonging to Marshall Women's Clubs became the core of the new collection. Approximately 25 children helped to move this core collection from its old home at 112 East Austin St. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17521/
[Children on an Outing, Marshall]
A group of unidentified children from Marshall are shown on a bus during an outing. The outing was sponsored by Marshall Public Library. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17710/
[Children Picnic at the Public Library]
Children were treated to a picnic and games on the grounds of Marshall Public Library at the end of the summer reading program. Several children, unidentified, are shown enjoying their picnic lunch. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17635/
[Children Play Games at Summer Reading Program]
At the end of the summer reading program by Marshall Public Library during the late 1970's, the activity was a picnic and play day. In this photo, unidentified children gather in a circle to begin a game. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17630/
[Children Play Games at the Library Picnic]
An adult moves to help a small child enter a game on play day at Marshall Public Library. A picnic and games activity concluded the library's summer reading program, c1976. All persons in the photo are unidentified. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17628/
[Children Race at the Picnic]
A picnic with games on the library grounds concluded the summer reading program at Marshall Public Library, c1976. A girl races across the grass as an adult cheers her on while other children wait their turn. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17617/
[Children Register for RIF Distribution at the Library]
Children register their choices after selecting books at RIF distribution day. The Marshall Public Library has participated in the Reading Is Fundamental program since its beginning. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17618/
[Children Select Free Books at the Public Library]
Children select books at Marshall Public Library during a RIF distribution day. The library has participated in the national program, Reading Is Fundamental, since its beginning. The program provides free books to elementary age children under a matching grant. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17597/
[Children's Event at the Public Library]
Children enjoy a picnic lunch on the grounds of Marshall Public Library. The event closed the summer reading program. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17556/
[Children's Event at the Public Library]
Children line up for a game at the picnic which was the closing activity of the summer reading program sponsored by the Marshall Public Library. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17547/
[Children's Group Begins Bus Trip, Marshall]
A group of unidentified children in Marshall, accompanied by adults, prepares to board a Continental Trailways Bus for an outing. The location is the parking lot at Marshall Public Library. The woman in the foreground is Dorothy Morrison, Director of Marshall Public Library. The scene probably dates from 1973-1984. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18057/
[Children's Group Begins Bus Trip, Marshall]
A group of unidentified adults and children prepare to board a Contnental Trailways bus for an outing in Marshall. The location of the scene is the parking lot of Marshall Public Library. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18056/
[Children's Group Begins Bus Trip, Marshall]
A smiling children's group begins an outing in Marshall, Texas. The nature of the trip is unknown; but the group departed from the Marshall Public Library in a Continental Trailways bus. The library director, Dorothy Morrison, led the group. Other members of the group are unidentified. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18048/
[Children's Group Begins Bus Trip, Marshall]
Mrs. Dorothy Morrison, Marshall Public Library Director, prepares to lead children onto a chartered Continental Trailways bus for an outing. The bus driver offers his hand to assist Mrs. Morrison at right. Children are unidentified, as is the purpose of the trip. The group left from the library's parking lot. See other pictures of the event. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18052/
[Children's Group on a Bus Trip, Marshall]
A group of children travel by Continental Trailways bus on an outing from Marshall Public Library in Marshall. The group was led by director Dorothy Morrison. Other members of the group are unidentified. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18047/
[Children's Picnic Concludes Summer Reading Program]
Only one girl, unidentified, does not seem to enjoy the picnic provided as a conclusion to the Marshall Public Library's summer reading program. The picnic was held on the library grounds. An adult and three children in the background are also unidentified in this slide from the 1970's. One person, possibly adult, is hidden at left. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17633/
[Children's Play Day at the Public Library]
Girls run on the grassy area near the public library. A boy walks near them at right. The children participated in a picnic and play day that closed the summer reading program at Marshall Public Library. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17640/