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  Partner: Marshall Public Library
[Dr. H. D. Bruce, Educator and Library Supporter]
Dr. H. D. Bruce of East Texas Baptist College was a supporter of the drive to build a new public library in Marshall, as this article explains. The new building was completed in 1973. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17480/
[Dr. James R. Sheppard, Marshall Physician]
Dr. James R. Sheppard was an African-American physician who established a hospital in Marshall in 1925. It was located at 606 S. Carter St. in the historic New Town Neighborhood in the western part of the city. It was called the Sheppard Sanitarium on the Sanborn Maps. Later the hospital was purchased by Dr. Williams Watts and renamed the Sheppard-Watts Hospital. Nothing more is known about Dr. Sheppard. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18015/
[Dr. Joseph J. Rhoads, President of Bishop College]
Dr. Joseph J. Rhoads was an educator, administrator, and advocate for civil rights in education who completed his career as the first African-American president of Bishop College in Marshall. He was born in 1890 in Marshall, and was educated there. He received his first degree from Bishop College; his second degree from the University of Michigan; and a Lit. D. degree from Bishop College. He also did graduate work at Yale University, receiving a scholarship there. He held numerous positions as teacher and school administrator from Texas to Alabama before being appointed to the presidency of Bishop in 1929. He led Bishop to its first accreditation by the Texas Dept. of Education and other major accrediting associations. During his tenure, Dr. Rhoads discontinued Bishop's high school department, opened a junior college campus in Dallas, and affiliated with the United Negro College Fund. He also organized the Lacy Kirk Williams Ministers' Institute, a short-term training center for inservice ministers and laity. He consistently advocated for racial equality in education through the offices he held in numerous organizations. Dr. Rhoads died in 1951, and was buried in the McJohnson Cemetery in Marshall. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17978/
[Dr. M. W. Dogan, Wiley College President]
Dr. Matthew Winfred Dogan was a Marshall educator who became president of Wiley University (now Wiley College) in 1896 and served in that office for more than 45 years. M. W. Dogan Elementary School in Marshall was named for him. Dr. Dogan was born December 21, 1863 in Pontotoc, Mississippi, to William and Jennie Dogan. His parents purchased their own and their children's freedom from slavery through frugality and hard work; so that Matthew Winfred was born free. He earned his education from first grade through graduation from college by working as a bootblack in his father's barbershop. In 1886 he received his A.B. degree in mathematics from Rust University, where he was noted for his high scholarship and his logical mind. After three years on the faculty at Rust, he was called to a mathematics professorship at Central Tennessee College (later Walden College). Success there led to his appointment to the Wiley presidency, being only the second African-American to attain that office. During his tenure there were numerous achievements: a building program which produced five buildings; a new Carnegie library; other building and landscaping improvements; expanded course offerings; new degree programs in law, nursing, and theology; lengthening the school term; eliminating the old grammar and secondary schools with a name change; offering the Ph.D. degree; affiliation of fraternal and sororal organizations; increases in enrollment from many states and foreign countries; and changes in the financial foundation. In 1888 he married Fannie Forrest Faulkner, also a teacher. They were the parents of seven children. She died on June 16, 1929. Dr. Dogan is buried in the Wiley College Cemetery in Marshall. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18007/
[Dr. M. W. Dogan, Wiley College President]
Dr. Matthew Winfred Dogan was a Marshall educator who became president of Wiley University (now Wiley College) in 1896 and served in that office for more than 45 years. M. W. Dogan Elementary School in Marshall was named for him. Dr. Dogan was born December 21, 1863 in Pontotoc, Mississippi, to William and Jennie Dogan. His parents purchased their own and their children's freedom from slavery through frugality and hard work; so that Matthew Winfred was born free. He earned his education from first grade through graduation from college by working as a bootblack in his father's barbershop. In 1886 he received his A.B. degree in mathematics from Rust University, where he was noted for his high scholarship and his logical mind. After three years on the faculty at Rust, he was called to a mathematics professorship at Central Tennessee College (later Walden College). Success there led to his appointment to the Wiley presidency, becoming only the second African-American to attain that office. In 1888 he married Fannie Forrest Faulkner, also a teacher. They were the parents of seven children. She died on June 16, 1929. The article surrounding the photograph describes the occasion on which Dr. Dogan was honored for his long tenure. The event was a convocation in the Wiley College chapel, June 2, 1941. Methodist Bishops, educators from other colleges, ministers, and the Wiley Board of Trustees spoke of his meritorious service. In addition, there were testimonials in letters and telegrams from state governors, college presidents, and others. Dr. Dogan is buried in the Wiley College Cemetery in Marshall. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17974/
[Dr. Nolan H. Anderson, Marshall Physician]
Dr. Nolan Hamilton Anderson was a physician in Marshall who established the University Medical Clinic on University Ave. in Marshall. He was also one of the founders of the Harrison County Nursing Home. Born Nov. 8, 1910, he died in August, 1977. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17965/
[Dr. O. L. Bledsoe, Marshall Physician]
Dr. Ovid L. Bledsoe of Marshall is featured in this clipping from a newspaper, newsletter, or program. A physician, he practiced medicine in Marshall for 33 years. The Bledsoe name is prominent in local African-American history. The doctor was born between 1886 and 1888 to Rev. W. F. Bledsoe, a minister and successful businessman in Marshall. The young Ovid graduated from Bishop College in 1908 and then from Meharry Medical College in 1912. He returned to Marshall to practice the rest of his life. His office was located on the Northwest Public Square. He also joined with Dr. G. T. Coleman and Dr. F. E. Williams to establish a clinic on Sanford Street. He married Letta Carey, who taught at Bishop College, in 1917. They were parents of two children Zeta and Ovid L., Jr. The family home was at 703 W. Grand Ave. Letta died in 1931, and in 1943 the doctor married Mary Elizabeth Watson, the librarian at Bishop College. The entire Bledsoe family was active in church and civic affairs; but most particularly they supported Bishop College. Dr. O. L. Bledsoe died February 21, 1945. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17815/
[Dr. O. L. Bledsoe, Marshall Physician]
Dr. Ovid. L. Bledsoe was a physician in Marshall for 33 years. Born between 1886 and 1888, he was the son of Rev. W. F. Bledsoe, minister and successful businessman, also of Marshall. The young Ovid graduated from Bishop College in 1908 and then from Meharry Medical College in 1912. He returned to Marshall to practice the rest of his life. His office was located on the Northwest Public Square. He also joined with Dr. G. T. Colman and Dr. F. E. Williams to establish a clinic on Sanford Street. He married Letta Carey, who taught at Bishop College, in 1917. They were parents of two children, Zeta and Ovid L., Jr. The family home was at 703 W. Grand Ave. After Letta's death in 1931, the doctor remained single until marrying Mary Elizabeth Watson in 1943. She was a librarian at Bishop College. The entire Bledsoe family was active in church and civic affairs; but most particularly they supported Bishop College. Dr. O. L. Bledsoe died February 21, 1945. The picture may be from a program or the Bishop College yearbook. The word "medical" is printed above the photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17961/
[Dr. O. W. Phillips, Marshall Dentist]
Dr. Oliver Wendell Phillips, Sr. was a dentist in Marshall in the first half of the twentieth century. He was born in Harrison County, date unknown. He graduated from the Bishop College academic department (high school). In 1921 he received the Doctor of Dental Surgery Degree from Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee. He received a Bachelor of Science degree from Bishop College in the same year. His wife was Miss Mayme Adams, and they bore two children. He was active in the historic Bethesda Baptist Church. He supported Bishop College throughout his life, even to serving as college dentist. He was also on the dental staff of the T&P Railroad Company for many years. In addition, he had a private practice. His office was located at 111 1/2 W. Houston Street. Dr. Phillips died September 16, 1955. He is buried in the Powder Mill Cemetery. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18011/
[Dr. Rubye Jones, Dallas Educator]
Dr. Rubye Jo Williams Jones taught sociology at S.M.U in Dallas. She was reared in Marshall, the daughter of Milton and Rubye Adams Williams. She graduated from Pemberton High School, following with a B. S. degree in sociology (alma mater unknown). She then attended graduate school at T.W.U., working as a graduate assistant. She earned her PhD. there and then joined the S.M.U. faculty. She was featured in this newspaper clipping, date unknown. In the picture she wears a mortarboard and an academic robe with hood. She is married to Kenneth C. G. Jones, also of Marshall. They live in Dallas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17970/
[Dr. T. L. Hunter, Marshall Dentist]
Dr. Thomas L. Hunter was a dentist who came to Marshall in 1917 and practiced there more than 50 years. Born around 1884 in Navasota, Texas, he was educated at Prairie View College and Meharry Medical College. He was active in church, charitable, and civic organizations. He was honored by Meharry, the National Dental Association, and Wiley College for his contributions to dentistry and to education. He died November 14, 1969, and was buried in the Rose Hill Garden Cemetery. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18000/
[Dr. Theopolus Caviness Makes an Address in Marshall]
Dr. Theopolus Caviness prepares to give an address during a visit to Marshall. The event and date are unknown. He is wearing the traditional doctor's academic robes. A microphone dangles in front of his tie. Dr. Caviness is married to Jimmie Pitts Caviness, singer and vocal teacher, who also has an entry in the Texas History Portal. The Caviness couple lived in Cleveland, Ohio at the time of this picture, c1970-1984. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18147/
[D. E. Williams, Marshall Educator]
Mrs. D. E. Williams taught English at an African-American high school in Marshall. No other information about her is available. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18012/
[Early Audio Equipment at Marshall Public Library]
A view of the audio equipment which was current when Marshall Public Library was built in 1973. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17653/
[Early Grave in Harrison County]
An old tombstone in Harrison County is engraved "Mother Bessie." A cherub's head with wings adorns the stone. The cemetery is unidentified. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18156/
[East Texas Oil Museum, Kilgore]
An oil derrick stands in front of the East Texas Oil Museum. Located on the Kilgore College campus at Hwy 259 and Ross St, it commemorates the discovery of oil in East Texas in 1930. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18087/
[Ebenezer Baptist Church in Harrison County]
Ebenezer Baptist church is located four miles northwest of Marshall on Hwy 154. Ebenezer has a traditonally African-American congregation. It was organized in 1897. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17839/
[Ebenezer United Methodist Church, Marshall]
Ebenezer United Methodist Church in Marshall is a traditionally African-American congregation which was established in 1867 as a Methodist Episcopal Church ( as the denomination was named then). The congregation has contributed at least three bishops to Methodism. The building shown was constructed in 1958, following other structures. The sanctuary is in the right wing, joined to an education-administration wing at left whose entrance is marked by a bell tower with cross atop. The church is located at 903 Whetstone Street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18002/
[Edwards Chapel Baptist Church]
Edwards Chapel Baptist Church is located at 1900 Olive St. on Marshall's "North Side." The congregation is traditionally African-American. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17807/
[Elderly Woman in Harrison County]
Photograph of an unidentified African-American woman posed in a wood chair on the porch of a frame building. The elderly woman wears clothing of a hundred or more years ago and has a cloth around her hair. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17774/
[Elizabeth Bishop]
Mrs. Elizabeth Bishop. She is dressed as for a celebration, wearing a corsage. A man stands behind her. Mrs. Bishop was born April 15, 1892. She was the mother of three children. She was a member of St. John Baptist Church. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17724/
[End of Summer Reading Program at the Library]
In 1979 the summer reading program at the Marshall Public Library ended with a picnic and outdoor games. Here the children line up for one of the activities. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18759/
[Entrance to Greenwood Cemetery, Marshall]
The entrance to the old Greenwood Cemetery in Marshall is flanked by two stone columns with name plaques. The column on the right has a Texas Historical Marker next to it. The marker notes that the cemetery dates to 1840 and was originally a burial ground for the Van Zandt family. The Van Zandts were an East Texas founding family and Texas patriots. Later the cemetery passed into public ownership and has been used continuously. There are some gravestones of Civil War soldiers, and many others. Greenwood is located on Herndon Street, near East Texas Baptist University. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18066/
[Equipment at Marshall Public Library]
During the 1980's decade, equipment at Marshall Public Library included portable televisions and videotape recorder/players. In the photograph, a television sits on an audio-visual cart with the videotape machine below Nearby another television sits on a counter. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17546/
[Equipment at Marshall Public Library]
An unidentified piece of equipment sits near the back entrance of Marshall Public Library. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17575/
[Equipment at Marshall Public Library]
A portable television waits for use at Marshall Public Library during the early years from 1973-1984. The television sits on an audio-visual cart with an early videocassette player-recorder on the shelf below. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17532/
[Equipment at Marshall Public Library]
Equipment that was essential at Marshall Public Library duriing the 1970s-1980s decades was stored on the this counter in the library workroom. Shown from left are a television, some videocassette boxes, filmstrip and slide boxes, a slide projector, and a calculator. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17543/
[Equipment at Marshall Public Library]
A microfilm machine, c1975, sits on a table, ready for use at the Marshall Public Library. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17553/
[Equipment at Marshall Public Library]
Equipment in the early years of Marshall's new library, 1973-1984, included a laminator, left, and an unidentified machine, right. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17525/
[Equipment at Marshall Public Library]
Equipment at Marshall Public Library in the early years, 1973-1990, included portable television, a slide projector, and a videocassette player-recorder. In the photo, the equipment waits for use on a counter near the rear entrance. There are also some videocassettes and slide containers. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17909/
[European City]
This city appears to be European in architecture. It is believed to be a photograph of the city of Florence, Italy. The Basilica di Santa Maria del Fiore can be seen on the left edge of the image. The photo may come from a private collection in Harrison County of a travel tour. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17566/
[European Village]
A view of some alps from a window. Chalets at a distance suggest a European location. The photo is in a Harrison County collection. It may have been taken by a tour group from Marshall. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17568/
[Evans Street, Marshall]
The view shows Evans Street in Marshall where it crosses the T&P railroad tracks. Evans runs due north-south from a point beyond the city limits (present-day Loop 390) to West Grand Ave. (Hwy 80). The picture, c1970-1985, shows heavy vegetation on both sides. Two houses can be seen, one on each side of the road. The railroad crossing with the warning signs is in the foreground. Evans crosses the tracks less than two long blocks north of the W. Grand intersection. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18028/
[Exterior View, Marshall Public Library]
An automobile is parked outside Marshall Public Library's north entrance on Fannin St. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17517/
[Festival Booth, Marshall]
An unidentified man sits at a festival booth in Marshall. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17508/
[Field Day, Marshall]
A group hosts a field day. The participants, event, date, and location are unidentified. A table at center holds a display. Two young girls sit in front next to a sign about the event. A woman in white stands nearby. In the distance, men in uniform appear to supervise games while adults look on. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17761/
[Filmstrip Projector]
A filmstrip projector (35mm) was a standard piece of audio-visual equipment in schools and libraries, beginning c1965. This model belonged to Marshall Public Library, which was built in 1973. The filmstrip projector was replaced by videocassette and VHS player-recorder technology. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17612/
[First Lady Supports New Library]
Mrs. Lyndon B. Johnson, right, former First Lady and a native of Harrison County, met with Fenn Lewis, left, president of the Marshall Friends of a Public Library, at the LBJ Library in Austin. Mrs. Johnson was honorary chairwoman of the National Gifts and Grants Committee of the Marshall Public Library Building Fund Drive. She and Lewis met to review plans for the new facility, which opened in October, 1973. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17686/
[First Librarian of Marshall Public Library, Dorothy Morrison]
Mrs. Dorothy Morrison was the first director of the Marshall Public Library from 1970 to 1984. Here she is shown with the library's bookmobile in the background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18808/
[First Membership Cards to Friends of Marshall Public Library]
According to the caption of this Marshall newspaper item, "Mrs. Max Lale, right, of the Friends of Public Library Membership Committee, presents membership cards to Mr. and Mrs. Clayton Lewis." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18760/
[First United Methodist Church, Marshall]
First United Methodist Church of Marshall stands at 300 E. Houston Street one block from the downtown square. The congregation traces its roots to a circuit-riding preacher in 1839, although they were formally organized in 1845. The church building was finished in 1861, built slaves who hand-made brick and hand-hewed the beams. The bricks have been covered with stucco as a preservative. The Greek-Revival sanctuary is to the right with its steeple containing a working carillon. The portico with its four columns was once open. The central section was later enclosed and enhanced with a large stained-glass window. The wing at left contains a gymnasium. Between the two main structures is a landscaped courtyard enclosed by two arcaded walks. The large campus occupies most of a city block, and much of it cannot be seen in the picture. At the right edge of the picture, a portion of the Hotel Marshall is visible. The church building is a recorded Texas Historic Landmark and is also entered in the National Register of Historic Places. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18074/
[Flag Presentation]
The first flag to fly over the new Marshall Public Library was flown over the Capitol before being presented to the library by the Ladies Auxiliary of the VFW Post 3969. The gift was made possible by Congressman Sam B. Hall of Harrison County. Three members of the Army National Guard are shown raising the colors at the formal presentation ceremony. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17513/
[Flag Presented to Library]
This flag flew over the Capitol before flying over the Marshall Public Library. The Ladies Auxiliary of Post 3969 presented the flag in formal ceremonies to Louis Kariel (right of flag), chairman of the library's Board of Trustees. The gift was arranged through Congressman Sam B. Hall, Jr. of Harrison County. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17670/
[Formal Portrait of an African-American Man]
An unidentified African-American man posed for this formal picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17741/
[Former Church in Marshall]
This church was located at the corner of Garrett and Johnson streets in Marshall. The sign at the corner of the white frame building reads, "Marshall C.O.G.I.C Pastor__McLane." This Church of God in Christ served a traditionally African-American congregation. It has been torn down. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17852/
[Former Marshall Public Library Building]
A horse and surrey stops in front of the former quarters of the Marshall Public Library in this old newspaper photo. The building and land belonged to a group of local women's clubs, which maintained a private lending library. The clubs deeded the building and land to the city for public library use. A modern new library building opened in October, 1973. Soon after, the older structure passed to the Marshall Chamber of Commerce, which still calls it home. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17503/
[Frances Blake Wallace]
Frances Blake Wallace was a noted African-American educator in Harrison and Panola Counties. Originally from Jefferson, she graduated from Bishop College in Marshall. Except for brief periods in Corsicana and Linden, she remained in the Marshall area, where she eventually became a supervisor, principal, and member of the Bishop faculty. She was also active in civic and professional organizations. She was listed in several Who's Who volumes about educators, southerners, and women. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18099/
[Frances Blake Wallace, Harrison County Educator]
Frances Blake Wallace was an East Texas educator who spent most of her 43-year teaching career in Harrison County schools. Born in Jefferson about 1900, she was raised and educated there. She graduated from Bishop College in Marshall. Then followed a varied career that included elementary, high school and college level experience. She was also a Jeanes Supervisor, Director of Education, supervisor of county schools, and principal. She was listed in Who's Who in American Education, Personalities of the South, and Who's Who of American Women. She was also active in numerous civic and professional organizations. Her death date is unknown. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18003/
[Fred Douglas Roland]
Mr. Fred Douglas Roland was County Agriculture Agent of Harrison County from 1926-1957. He established several innovative programs like the Sabine Farm Project. He was active in civic organisations such as the Cancer Board and Red Cross. He was also a trustee of Galilee Baptist Church of Marshall. He died in March, 1969. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18176/
[Fred Newhouse, Harrison County Olympian]
Fred Newhouse, native of Hallsville in Harrison County, won gold and silver medals in track and field at the 1976 Montreal Olympics. He was a graduate of Galilee High School texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17763/