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  Partner: Marshall Public Library
[Grave of John Robert Edward Lee]
The grave of John Robert Edward Lee is located in the Powder Mill Cemetery, on FM 1997 in Marshall. The cemetery is traditionally African-American. Dates on the stone are 1864-1944. Words at the bottom are illegible. Engraved flowers decorate the top. The grave of his wife, Ardelia A. Lee, is nearby. Lee was one of the earliest students of Bishop College. He graduated in 1889 and joined the Bishop faculty. In 1900 he became academic director of Tuskegee Institute. After serving as a school principal in Kansas for a period, he was appointed president of Florida A&M, where he remained until death. The Lees' son brought his parents' bodies from Florida to Marshall to be buried in Powder Mill. Hence the comparative newness and similarity of the monuments. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18791/
[Grave of John T. Johnson, Harrison County]
Photograph of the grave of John T. Johnson, located in Harrison County, the cemetery unidentified. The stone has the dates 1901-1975 and the words, "We Will Meet Again." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17957/
[Grave of Lee Annie Brown, Marshall]
The grave of Lee Annie Brown is located in Nichols (Old Sudduth) Cemetery on Merrill St. in Marshall. It a traditionally African-American site. The dates 1863-1935 are engraved on the stone, which is applied to the slab. Above the stone is a decoration. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17864/
[Grave of Lillie Adams, Marshall]
The grave of Lillie Adams is in the Powder Mill Cemetery on FM 1997 in Marshall. The cemetery is traditionally African-American. The dates on the pink granite stone are Nov. 18, 1890 - Sept. 27, 1972. The word "Mother" is above the name. Some illegible words are below the dates. An open book design in white frames the information. Stalks of flowers also adorn the design. Some real or artificial plants are to the left and right of the headstone. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18813/
[Grave of Lizzie Powell, Marshall]
The grave of Lizzie Powell, Marshall is located in the Powder Mill Cemetery on FM 1997 in Marshall. The cemetery is traditionally African-American. The dates on the stone are 1880-1966. Engraved stylized flowers in a container decorate the bottom of the stone. A brick border and a cyclone fence enclosed the area. Some potted flowers stand to the left. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18792/
[Grave of Marcus Emory, Marshall]
The grave of Marcus Emory is located in Powder Mill Cemetery on FM 1997 in Marshall. The cemetery is traditionally African-American. The dates are 1928-1976. The words "...US ARMY" are between the name and the dates. The stone rests on a slab with a name marker above. A pot or vase of flowers decorates the slab. To the left is another stone, unidentified. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18814/
[Grave of Mary E. Langston, Marshall]
The grave of Mary E. Langston is located in the Powder Mill Cemetery in north Marshall on FM 1997. It is a traditionally African-American cemetery. The dates for Langston are 3-1-1890 - 8-31-1976. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17693/
[Grave of Mary E. Langston, Marshall]
The grave of Mary E. Langston is in the Powder Mill Cemetery on FM 1997 in Marshall. The cemetery is traditionally African-American. The dates on the stone are 3-11-1890 and 8-31-1976. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18798/
[Grave of Matthew Leach III]
The grave of Matthew Leach III is located in the Power Mill Cemetery on FM 1997 in Marshall. The cemetery is traditionally African-American. Dates on the stone are Oct 13 1932-Feb 5 1972. Other words are "Texas PVT US ARMY KOREA." A plain encircled cross decorates the top of the stone. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18793/
[Grave of Millie Green, Marshall]
The grave of Millie Green is in Nichols Cemetery on Merrill St. in Marshall. The site is traditionally African-American. The dates on the stone are 10 Jan. 1879 and 17 Jul 1939. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17823/
[Grave of Mrs. Addie M. Vincent in Marshall]
The grave of Mrs. Addie M. Vincent is in the Nichols (Old Sudduth) Cemetery on Merrill St. in east Marshall. The site is traditionally African-American. Words on the stone related that she was the wife of Rev. J O [C.?] Vincent. The dates are 1899 and 1969. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17826/
[Grave of Paul Rudd, Marshall]
The grave of Paul Rudd is located in the Powder Mill Cemetery on FM 1997 in Marshall. The cemetery is traditionally African-American. The dates on the stone are Mar 5 1882-Apr 2 1910. The other engravings are illegible. The grave is inside a low iron fence with a decorative post, all in an old style. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18789/
[Grave of Rev. Patterson, Harrison County]
The grave of Rev. (James H.?) Patterson is in an unidentified (Antioch?) cemetery in Harrison County. The dates on the decorated stone are Sept 17 (27?) 1847 and Aug. 29 1915. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17837/
[Grave of Richard Bennett, Harrison County]
The grave of Richard Bennett is located in an unidentified Harrison County Cemetery. One date on the stone is visible in the picture: Nov. 15 1891. Other words on the stone are "Texas CPL 317 AM TN 92 DIV World War I. A plain encircled cross decorates the top of the stone. In the background are other stones and markers that place this grave in a cemetery. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17976/
[Grave of Rudd Couple, Harrison County]
Photograph of the grave of a husband and wife with the name of Rudd. An iron fence is behind the stone. A slab is on the grave of the husband but not the wife. The other grave may not have been used at the time of the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17696/
[Grave of Sarah McDaniels, Harrison County]
The grave of Sarah McDaniels is located in Harrison County; but the cemetery is unidentified. The dates for McDaniels are 1868-1938. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17704/
[Grave of Sonnie Boy McCarley, Marshall]
The grave of Sonnie Boy McCarley [McCorley?] lies in the Powder Mill Cemetery on FM 1997 in Marshall. The only date on the stone is February 21 1925. Other engravings are "Texas PVT.....93 DIV" and a plain encircled cross at the top. The grave stands near an iron fence. Another grave is visible beyond. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18794/
[Grave of Susie R. Hodge Montgomery in Marshall]
The grave of Susie R. Hodge Montgomery is located in the Nichols (Old Sudduth) Cemetery on Merrill St. in east Marshall. Nichols is a traditionally African-American cemetery. The dates on the stone are 1888-1963. The stone also has the words "Mother" and "Rest in Peace." Stylized flowers are engraved in to the top of the stone, which stands above a slab. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17963/
[Grave of Thomas J. Willis, Marshall]
The grave of Thomas J. Willis is located in the Nichols (Old Sudduth) Cemetery on Merrill St. in the east side of Marshall. The dates on the stone are Jan 16 1937 - Feb 10 1964. A flower holder stands next to the headstone. A bunch of flowers lies on the ground next to its holder. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17959/
[Grave of Wendell and Mayme Phillips, Marshall]
The grave of Wendell and Mayme Phillips is located in the Powder Mill Cemetery on FM 1997, Marshall. The cemetery is traditionally African-American. The dates for Wendell Phillips are Sept. 21, 1896-Sept. 16, 1955. The dates for Mayme Phillips are Sept. 30, 1903-May 3, 1952. The words engraved below are, "How desolate our home bereft of them." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18756/
[Grave of Willie S. Truitt, Marshall]
The grave of Willie S. Truitt is in the Powder Mill Cemetery on FM 1997 in Marshall. The cemetery is traditionally African-American. The dates on the stone are Feb 2 1916 - Feb 5 1974. There are also the words "Texas Pvt Army Air Force World War II." The legs of a person are visible in the upper left area of the photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18819/
[Graves in Harrison County]
Photograph of unidentified graves located in Harrison County. Some of the lettering is not legible. The grave on the left holds Melisa L. Scott Morris. Her dates are May 1 1913 - Apr 2 1971. Below are the words, "She died as she lived" and an illegible word. A banner on the slab has her name and years of birth and death. Below the banner is a large fern leaf. The stone on the right has a scroll with the word "Mother" and a partial name, "A. Pearl How..." The partial dates are "1900-197-." A banner with illegible words is on the slab of this grave also. Both headstones are of pink granite with floral decoration. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17952/
[Graves in Harrison County]
Graves in an unidentified cemetery in Harrison County are illegible. The word "Family" appears on the standing stone. The graves appear to be0 decorated with plants. At the edge of the site is a cyclone fence with privacy fencing behind. Other stones are visible in the distance. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17979/
[Graves in Nichols Cemetery, Marshall]
These graves are in Nichols (Old Sudduth) Cemetery on Merrill St. in east Marshall. The letters on the stone in foreground are illegible. The stone at right center is for two Madisons. Others are visible in the distance. The cemetery, a traditionally African-American site, is maintained. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17817/
[Graves in Nichols Cemetery, Marshall]
Two graves in Nichols Cemetery, Marshall, belong to the Turner family. At right is Milissa Turner, Mar 07, 1864-Nov. 17, 1952. At left is Maliss Turner, Oct. 04, 1908-Nov. 17, 1941. Behind the fence can be seen the roof of a modern ranch house. Nichols Cemetery (also called Old Sudduth) is located on Merrill St. in east Marshall. It is surrounded by modern subdivisions. It is a traditionally African-American cemetery. Enclosed by wood and cyclone fencing, the site is still used. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17984/
[Graves of John and Roberta Madison, Marshall]
The graves of John and Roberta Madison are in Nichols (Old Sudduth) Cemetery in Marshall. The cemetery is traditionally African-American. The dates for John (right) are 1888-1970. The dates for Roberta (left) are 1884-1975. He was a local preacher. Roberta Madison's maiden is Choyce and her parent were Frank Choyce and Rebecca Copeland. Roberta's first husband was Lucky Singleton. Roberta's Grandfather was Peter Choyce who ran for the House of Representative in 1880. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17705/
[Greater Oak Grove Baptist Church, Marshall]
Greater Oak Grove Baptist Church is located on Hwy 43 (Karnack Highway) in Marshall. It is a traditionally African-American congregation. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17803/
[Greater Rock Spring Baptist Church, Harrison County]
There are two Rock Spring Baptist churches in Harrison County. This one is the Greater Rock Spring Baptist Church No 2, located on Hwy 43 ten miles southwest of Marshall. Originally the site was by the Rock Springs Cemetery. The date of the move to the present site is unknown. The church shown is a white frame building with a bell tower or cupola. The front entrance is covered by a gabled porch. A sign stands near the window at right. The history relates that this was originally a Methodist church for white people; but they turned it over to a black congregation in 1871. The two white men who took part were Parson Carter and Parson William Russell. The first pastor after the transfer was Parson William Townson. The building shown was erected between 1931 and 1951, when the "Father of the Church," Rev. J. J. Jones, was pastor. Physical improvements have been added twice. During the second remodeling, 1975-1978, the word "Greater" was added to the church's name so that it has been known as "Greater Rock Spring Baptist Church No. 2" since that time. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17882/
[Greenwood Cemetery, Marshall]
The entrance to old Greenwood Cemetery near East Texas Baptist University in Marshall has a Texas Historical marker. The marker relates that the cemetery "Originated 1840 as private burial ground Van Zandt family." The Van Zandts were a founding family in Harrison County, and Texas patriots. The cemetery later became public and has numerous old graves. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18091/
[The Gregg-Hampton mansion, Historic Home, Marshall]
The Gregg-Hampton mansion was located at 407 W. Rusk street in Marshall. In 1984, it was a victim of an early morning fire which rendered it beyond repair. The site now belongs to the First Baptist Church. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18083/
[Group Examines Marker]
A group examines a stone commemoration marker. At left is Judge Ben Z. Grant. The other man and woman are unidentified. The marker is also not known; but the word "ESTABLISHED" is clearly on the bottom of the engraving. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17496/
[Group Tours European Ruins]
A group tours ruins that appear to be European. The group and the place are unidentified. The photo is from Harrison County. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17578/
[Group With a Tour Bus]
An unidentified group, possibly from Harrison County, poses in front of their tour bus. The group is composed of nine women and four men, most of whom are youth. The place appears to be a parking lot. A building with automobiles is visible in the background. A large light pole stands behind the bus. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17576/
[H. J. Tolbert, Marshall Educator]
Mr. Herschel J. Tolbert taught mathematics at Pemberton High School in Marshall. The picture is from a PHS yearbook. Further information about him is unknown. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18001/
[Harrison County Courhouse Burns]
The photo shows the Harrison County Courthouse burning on June 7, 1899. Materials left by a repairman working on the roof caught fire. Several groups, including a man on a horse, watch from N. Washington St. This was the third county courthouse, completed in 1889. Designed by Tozer & McQuirk of Dallas, local builder James Higgins did the construction. The building was designed in the Second Empire style, with a 275-foot tower, brick walls, sandstone trim, and Italianate detailing. It faced north toward N. Washington St. It was replaced within two years with a fourth courthouse which still stands. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17764/
[Hazel B. Howard, Marshall Educator]
Mrs. Hazel Balthazar Howard of Marshall retired in 1977 after thirty-seven years of teaching. She was born in Louisiana, but was educated in that state and in Texas. Her teaching degree came from Texas College in Tyler, and her Master degree from Denver University. After six years of teaching in Longview, she came to Marshall and taught for thirty-one years. Her school resume included Pemberton High School, where she taught English. The picture is from the PHS yearbook, possibly 1950-1953. She was active in several teacher organizations. She also volunteered at the public library, her church, the parochial school, and a nursing home. Although active outside her home, she was mother to four children and grandmother to seven. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18055/
[Head Start and Day Care Center, Marshall]
The Carter Street Head Start and Day Care Center was located at 611 South Carter St. in Marshall at the time of this photograph, taken between 1965-80. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17530/
[Head Start Class, Marshall]
A Head Start class in Marshall was photographed on the front steps of their facility with their teachers, unidentified. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17542/
[Helen Sheppard, Marshall Educator]
Mrs. Helen C. Sheppard taught homemaking education classes at Pemberton High School in Marshall. In the picture, she arranges a display of garments on a table in front of a bulletin board. Lights and the board caption "It's Christmas Consider Home and Family" announce the seasonal theme. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17941/
[Helen Sheppard, Marshall Educator]
Mrs. Helen A. Sheppard taught "Home and Family Life" classes at Pemberton High School in Marshall. The photograph is probably from a PHS yearbook. Nothing is known about her life. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18045/
[Historic Allen House, Marshall]
The Allen House in Marshall has a Texas Medallion. It is located at 610 N. Washington Ave. in the Marshall Historic District, which is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The residence was built in 1879 by the Rev. Walker Montecue Allen. Ordained by a Mississippi Presbytery in 1848, Rev. Allen and his wife moved to Marshall in 1876, where they served their faith until death. The home remained in the family estate until 1944, when it was sold. Eventually sub-divided into apartments, the house began a slow deterioration until it was rescued from demolition in 1972 by the Harrison County Historical Society, which saw to restoration. Its adjunct, the H. C. Conservation Society, has maintained the house to the present time. The house as pictured has a two-story frame structure with double galleries and a third-floor attic. Open to the public, it is always featured during the city's annual Christmas pilgrimage of homes. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18065/
[Historic Home, Marshall, Texas]
Marshall, Texas has many Victorian-era homes still in existence. Some are in good condition, others are being restored. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18167/
[Historic House, Marshall]
The Wigfall House in Marshall, Texas has a Texas Medallion designating it as a Texas Historic Landmark. It is located at 510 West Burleson Street. It was constructed between 1854 and 1856 by Mr. and Mrs. J. N. Jordan. During the Civil War it was owned by Louis T. Wigfall, a colorful lawyer and politician whose name endures with the house. It originally had the symmetrical, single-level plan of four rooms and a central hall that is typical of the early East Texas house. Subsequent owners have transformed it into a one-and-one-half story Victorian cottage. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18080/
[Historic House, Marshall]
The Fry-Barry house in Marshall has a Texas Medallion designating it as a Texas Historic Landmark. Built between 1853 and 1861 by Fidel Bercher, it is located at 314 West Austin Street very near the courthouse square. Architect W. R. D. Ward designed the raised-cottage plan. The main rooms are on the second level; but the lower level is enclosed with rooms also. Bricks were hand-made by local slaves. In 1872 the house was purchased by E. J. Fry, a member of the English Frye family that was associated with the family of Thomas Jefferson. E. J. Fry was in the Civil War before coming to Marshall where he was a successful businessman. A daughter married W. L. Barry and lived in the home until 1961; hence the name Fry-Barry. The house remained in the family for more than 110 years, and is still well maintained. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18078/
[Historic Train Depot, Marshall]
This train depot served the Texas & Pacific passenger traffic in Marshall when the city was a center for east-west transportation through Texas as well as a large railroad yard. Now the several trains which pass daily through the city are either T&P freight or AMTRAK. The depot has been restored by Marshall citizens and contains a museum. It is the centerpiece of the historic train district. The picture gives a side view of the building before its restoration. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18067/
[Historic Train Depot, Marshall]
A view of the Texas and Pacific depot in Marshall. The lettering proclaims "Marshall Passenger Station." The tracks run on both sides of the building, so that passengers descend through a tunnel from the parking lot to reach the station. On the second floor balconies permit visitors to view both T&P freight and AMTRAK trains passing underneath. The depot was restored during the 1900s by Marshall citizens and now contains a museum. The depot is the centerpiece of the city's historic train district. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18071/
[Historic Train District, Marshall]
The scene shows part of the historic train district of Marshall. In the right background, some freight cars and the upper story of the train depot appear behind the ticket office, which is in the right center. When passengers bought tickets, they descended into a tunnel which went underneath the tracks to the depot. In the left center is the Ginocchio Hotel, which served rail traffic for many decades. The picture dates from the 1960's. The hotel has been used for a number of venues, including restaurants and a museum, since the heyday of rail service. The All Things Good restaurant figures prominently in the image. The depot was restored during the 1990's and is now a railroad museum. Although the rail yards which made Marshall a rail center are long gone, the T&P railroad and AMTRAK still use the rail route with scheduled stops. The preservation of this historic area has been a highlight of community activity. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18084/
[Historic Train District, Marshall]
At the time of this picture, the old Ginocchio railroad hotel (at left) in Marshall contained the "All Things Good Restaurant." At right is the brick ticket office which contains the tunnel under the tracks to the historic depot, out of sight behind the office. In the center is a freight train rolling through. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18076/
[Historical Marker for Confederate Hat Factory, Marshall]
A historical marker recognizes the presence of the Confederate Hat Factory in Marshall, C.S.A., during the Civil War. A woman, unidentified, applauds the new marker. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18771/
[Home Interior]
The home in this photograph is located in Marshall. The owner and location are unidentified. Shown are interior furnishings. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17777/