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  Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Whitesboro]

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Whitesboro]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for Whitesboro in Whitesboro, Texas. Text: Settlers moved to this site after Ambrose B. White (1811-83) camped here on his way west from Illinois in 1848. His inn here was on the Butterfield Stage route after 1858. The post office, opened in 1860, was named for White, who surveyed (1869) the townsite with Dr. W.H. Trolinger (1827-95), donor of land for a park. When Whitesboro incorporated in 1873, White was elected its first mayor. The Denison & Pacific Railroad, later part of the Missouri, Kansas & Texas, arrived in 1879; the Texas & Pacific in 1881. Today the area's economy is based on recreational facilities and peanut production.
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Whitewright]

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Whitewright]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for Whitewright in Whitewright, Texas. Text: Early settlers in this part of Grayson County established communities at Orangeville (4 mi. e.), Pilot Grove (4 mi. s.), and Kentucky Town (3 mi. w.). In 1878, after the Missouri, Kansas, and Texas (MAT) railroad built a line southeast from Denison to this Site, a new town was created and named for William Whitewright (1825-1898), a railroad official and vice-president of Union Trust Company of New York, the railroad's financial backer. Immediately upon the news of the town's founding, former citizens of Orangeville, Pilot Grove, and Kentuckytown moved to Whitewright. A post office was established in 1878, along with numerous homes and businesses. By 1894 the town boasted schools, churches, a newspaper, a college, and community organizations, as well as railroad depots, cotton gins, restaurants, drugstores, grocery stores, wagon yards and livery stables, lumberyards, hardware stores, blacksmith shops, and numerous other businesses. Serious fires in 1904 and 1911 almost destroyed the central business district, but the citizens soon rebuilt. The city of Whitewright no longer has passenger rail service, but it continues its role as an important marketing center for this area of Grayson County.
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Whitewright Masonic Lodge No. 167]

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Whitewright Masonic Lodge No. 167]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for Whitewright Masonic Lodge No. 167 in Whitewright, Texas. Text: In 1855, men in Kentucky Town organized a Masonic Lodge, receiving their charter the following year as the Kentucky Town Masonic Lodge No, 167. More than 20 years later, in 1878, the Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railroad bypassed Kentucky Town, running three miles east in the newly established town of Whitewright. The Masonic Lodge moved in 1883, and in 1893, members changed the name to Whitewright Lodge No, 167 but kept the original Kentucky Town charter. The lodge has occupied several buildings since its founding. It has also served several affiliate Masonic orders, including Whitewright Chapter No. 198 of Royal Arch Masons, which merged with a Denison chapter in 1949, Whitewright Council No. 136, which merged with a Denison group in 1971, and the local order of the Eastern Star, comprised of men and women, continues to support the work of the lodge. Several lodge members have been leaders in government and in the Masonic order. These men include Dan Scott McMillin, Grant Master of Texas Masons in 1915, who served as both a State Representative and State Senator; James J. Gallaher, Grand ...
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[Texas Historical Commission Marker: William Whitley Wheat]

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: William Whitley Wheat]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for William Whitley Wheat in Howe, Texas. Text: William Whitley Wheat (1820-1890) was born in Alabama to Samuel and Cynthia (Stinson) Wheat. He married Cynthia Ann Maynard, and the couple came to Texas in 1842 to Peters Colony. They moved three years later to what is now Grayson County, settling and raising ten children near Farmington. Wheat was an early cattle drover to Northern markets, and he became a respected and successful farmer. He served for many years as Grayson County Commissioner in the 1870s and 1880s and was first presiding president of the Old Settlers Association of North Texas. As such, he worked to ease local tensions in the post-Civil War years. Recorded - 2002.
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Younger Scott McKinney Home]

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Younger Scott McKinney Home]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for Younger Scott McKinney Home in Van Alstyne, Texas. Text: The land surrounding this house was originally owned by Collin McKinney, a prominent early Texas statesman. In 1857 McKinney deeded the acreage to his son Younger Scott (1819-1907), who was born in Kentucky but grew up in Red River County. When Younger Scott McKinney moved to his property in Grayson County, he built this home for his wife Sarah (Janes) and their six children. In addition to being a farmer and an ordained Methodist Episcopal Minister, McKinney served as Grayson County Surveyor in 1852-53. The land remained in the family until 1928.
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
Grayson County Texas Historical Markers

Grayson County Texas Historical Markers

Date: 2012
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Presentation containing photographs of historic markers in Grayson County, Texas, organized alphabetically by city name. Each site slide includes the name, a photograph of the marker, and (when relevant) a photograph of the building or area described by the marker.
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
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