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  Partner: Palestine Public Library
 Language: English
[100 Block E. Oak]
Photograph of a three-story brick building located at the corner of Oak and Houston streets, in the 100 block of E. Oak in Palestine, Texas. The first floor has a glass storefront and the sign above says "Goodwill Industries." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10080/
[100 Block W. Kolstad]
Photo of the 100 block of W. Kolstad. Houses from the left to right are 119, 117, and 115 W. Kolstad. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth9442/
[100 Block W. Oak]
Photograph of a two-story, red-brick building located on the 100 Block W. Oak in Palestine, Texas, taken from the corner of Oak and Sycamore streets. There is a striped awning across the front of the building and signs for "Charles E. Dickens Jewelry" and "Watts Stationery & Office Supply Co." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10736/
[100 Block W. Oak]
Photograph of a one-story commercial building with metal siding on the front, located in the 100 Block W. Oak in Palestine, Texas. Text in the window says "Antiques." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10734/
[100 E. Brazos - Lamar School]
Photograph of the southwest corner of Lamar School, located at 100 E. Brazos in Palestine, Texas. It is a one-story brick building with a tile roof. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth9411/
[100 S. Sycamore - Pearlstone Grocery Company]
This building is one of the relatively few historic warehouses to survive in Palestine. The building is indicative of how little stylistic ornamentation was applied to buildings that were used for utilitarian purposes. The building does have paired, double-hung windows set within segmented arches and vertical brick piers that define the bays. The Davidson-Pearlstone Grocery Company was in operation at this site for several years following its formation in 1899. In 1904 local businessman Hyman Pearlstone bought the controlling interest and renamed the company. According to local historians, J.T. Sweetman bought an interest in the firm in 1905. The Pearlstone Grocery Company opened in this building in January 1913. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth9412/
[100 W. Oak]
Photograph of the front and side of the Kolstad Jewelry store, located at 100 W. Oak in Palestine, Texas, taken from the corner of Oak and Sycamore streets. It is a two-story brick building with decorative architectural elements around the upper-story windows and roofline. On the first floor, the walls around the store are tiled and there is a striped awning over the sidewalk with the text "Texas' Oldest Store" above the entrance. Signs above the awning say "Thomas C. Smith, Proprietor," "Kolstad," and "George Handson: Jeweler, Calligrapher, Clock Repair" on the front of the store and "Kolstad [...] Texas' Oldest Store" on the side. A part of an adjacent building is visible on the far right. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26386/
[101 E. Oak]
Photograph of the front and side of the "Federal Building," located at 101 E. Oak in Palestine, Texas. It is a two-story brick building with Renaissance Revival-style details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10077/
[101 W. Crawford]
Photograph of the front and east side of a commercial brick building located at 101 W. Crawford in Palestine, Texas, taken from the corner of Crawford and Sycamore streets. There are clothes in the windows and text next to the door: "Factory Outlet, Amkar Enterprises Inc., Designer Clothing." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10375/
[101 W. Main]
Photograph of the front and east side of a two-story building located at 101 W. Main in Palestine, Texas, taken from the corner of Main and Sycamore streets. The first floor is red brick in the front; the rest of the building has been painted a cream color. It has corbelled brickwork above the second floor windows and in the parapet. There is a sign on the corner of the building and writing above the front entrance says "Family Value Drug Center." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10148/
[102 E. Ezell]
Photograph of a white, one-story house located at 102 E. Ezell in Palestine, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10344/
[105 E. Main]
Photograph of the front and east side of a one-story brick building located at 105 E. Main in Palestine, Texas. There is an awning across the front of the building and text on the window says "Swift & Swift Attorneys at Law." Part of an adjoining two-story brick building is visible on the left and another building is visible in the background, behind a parking lot to the right of the building. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10149/
[105 W. Main]
Photograph of the front of a two-story brick building located at105 W. Main in Palestine, Texas. It is connected on either side to other two-story commercial buildings. There is decorative brickwork along the top of the building and the windows of the second floor are boarded over. There is a sidewalk cover along the front of the building and text on the door says "Fotopolos Shoe Store;" that business later closed. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10147/
[107 W. Crawford]
Photograph of the front of a brick building located at 107 W. Crawford in Palestine, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10374/
[109 E. Spring]
Photograph of a red-brick building located at 109 E. Spring in Palestine, Texas. The windows have logos for Toledo Finance and a sign over the door says "Toledo Loans." On the left of the building, an alley with a fire escape and part of a white stone building are visible. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10565/
[112-114 W. Dallas]
Photograph of the front and west side of a one-story, white, modified L-plan duplex located at 112-114 W. Dallas in Palestine, Texas. It has a wrap-around porch with Classical Revival-style Doric columns. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10359/
[116 N. Sycamore - Colley Wright Building]
Photo of the Colley Wright building, that once sat at the east side of the intersection of Spring street at Sycamore. This building was removed when Spring Street was widened and extended down to Crockett Road. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26266/
[117 W. Spring]
Photograph of a brick building located at 117 W. Spring in Palestine, Texas. A street sign and several decorative shrubs are visible to the left. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10562/
[122 E. Palestine Ave]
Photograph of the front and east side of a one story house located at 122 E. Palestine in Palestine, Texas, taken from the corner of East Palestine Avenue and Fowler Street. It is painted yellow with red and green trim and has some Queen Anne-style architectural elements including shingling in the gable ends and decorative wooden posts along the front porch. A sign in the yard says "Finley Real Estate." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10726/
[200 Block W. Crawford]
Photograph of the southwest corner of a commercial, red-brick building located on the 200 Block W. Crawford in Palestine, Texas, taken from the corner of W. Crawford and N. John streets. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10371/
[201 E. Kolstad]
Photograph of the front and east side of a two-story house located at 201 E. Kolstad in Palestine, Texas. It has Queen Anne-style architecture including a tower with a conical roof on the southeast corner and wood details along the front porch. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26615/
[201 E. Oak]
Photograph of the front and east side of a multi-story brick building located at 201 E. Oak in Palestine, Texas. The entrance on the corner has a glass door with an name on it and several full-length glass window; stonework text at the top of the building says "Ivanhoe No. 15. KofP." As per the 1898-1899 Palestine City Directory, this was the home of the Knights of Pythias. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10079/
[201 E. Oak]
Photograph of the front and west side of a multi-story brick building located at 201 E. Oak in Palestine, Texas. The entrance on the corner has a glass door with an name on it and several full-length glass window; stonework text at the top of the building says "Ivanhoe No. 15. KofP." As per the 1898-1899 Palestine City Directory, this was the home of the Knights of Pythias. A sign for a neighboring building that says "Goodwill Industries of East Texas" is visible on the far left. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10078/
[201 W. Crawford]
Photograph of the front and side of the "Denby Building," located at 201 W. Crawford in downtown Palestine, Texas. It is a three-story red-brick building, classified as a "Two-Part Commercial Block," that has grouped pivoting windows on the upper floors, and side-facing brickwork in the parapet. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10370/
[201 W. Crawford - Denby Bldg]
Photograph of the front and side of the "Denby Building," located at 201 W. Crawford in downtown Palestine, Texas. It is a three-story brick building, classified as a "Two-Part Commercial Block," that has grouped pivoting windows on the upper floors, and side-facing brickwork in the parapet. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth9399/
[201 W. Main]
Photograph of the front and east side of a white, two-story brick building located at 201 W. Main in Palestine, Texas, taken from the corner of Main and Magnolia streets. There is decorative brickwork along the top of the building on the east side, facing Magnolia Street. A sign above the entrance says "Singer Sales & Service;" a sign on the corner of the building says "Magnavox." An adjacent two-story building is visible on the left. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10146/
[205 E. Dallas]
Photograph of the front and west side of a two-story white house located at 205 E. Dallas in Palestine, Texas. There is an enclosed porch on both floors. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10361/
[210 Crawford - J.H. Silliman Home]
Photo of the J.H. Silliman Home, located at 210 Crawford. A Mississippi native, J.H. Silliman was the proprietor of Silliman and Company – a Palestine business founded in 1871, and one of the largest hardware stores in the region. Silliman married Laura Brook, the architect’James Frith Brook's, daughter, in 1920. The family later moved to 638 S. Magnolia. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26589/
[211 W. Main]
Photograph of the front and side of a one-story brick building located at 211 W. Main in Palestine, Texas. There is some decorative brickwork along the top of the building and an anchored sidewalk cover across the front. A sign over the door says "Fabrics by Anne E." Part of an adjacent building is visible on the left, and a neighboring building is visible on the other side of an alleyway on the right. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10145/
[212 S. Magnolia]
The 200 block of S. Sycamore is a densely developed residential area containing a significant concentration of 2-story frame houses erected in the 19th century. This house is noteworthy because it survives as a good and relatively intact historic dwelling in this neighborhood. The house has a 2-story porch with ornate jigsawn trim. This house was originally known as 107 Magnolia. The house was built for District Judge William H. Gill in 1893, who lived here until December 1903, when the property was purchased by Mrs. Lula K. Kestler. City directories, however, note that, by 1926, the house was owned and occupied by D.W. and Lula K. Gillespie (perhaps the same woman), and that by 1933 her husband had died and Mrs. Gillespie lived here alone. Directories further reveal that John L. Johnson, an oil field worker, and his wife Lillie lived here during the early 1940s. Katherine L. Mead, acquired the property in 1959, but the property has since changed hands once again. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25919/
[213 W. Main]
Photograph of the front of the "Robinson State Bank Building" located at 213 W. Main in Palestine, Texas. The building is made of red brick with Romanesque Revival detailing and is classified as a One-Part Commercial Block. It has a rectangular plan with load-bearing masonry construction, a 3-bay façade that displays elaborate brickwork, a large round archway marking the primary entrance, and a stepped, 3-part parapet with corbelling. A neon sign hung near the entrance says "Rushing Jewelers, Home of Lucky Forever Diamond Rings." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10143/
[213 W. Main - Robinson State Bank Building]
Photograph of the front of the "Robinson State Bank Building" located at 213 W. Main in Palestine, Texas. The building is made of red brick with Romanesque Revival detailing and is classified as a One-Part Commercial Block. It has a rectangular plan with load-bearing masonry construction, a 3-bay façade that displays elaborate brickwork, a large round archway marking the primary entrance, and a stepped, 3-part parapet with corbelling. A neon sign near the entrance says "Rushing Jewelers, Home of Lucky Forever Diamond Rings." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth9398/
[216 S. Magnolia]
This is a two story house located at 216 S. Magnolia, Palestine, Texas. It was built in the late 1800's. It is located almost directly across the street from the Bailey-Foster Funeral Home. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25918/
[217 W. Crawford]
Photograph of the front of the Texas Theater, part of the 200 Block of W. Crawford Street in Palestine, Texas. The building is made of brick and has masonry embellishments on the facade. There is a "Texas" sign on the front of the building and the marquee says "The Music Man, Palestine Community Theatre." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10373/
[217 W. Crawford]
Close-up photograph of decorative masonry on the front of the Texas Theater, part of the 200 Block of W. Crawford Street in Palestine, Texas. There is a "Texas" sign on the front of the building and the marquee says "The Music Man, Palestine Community Theatre." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10372/
[220 W. Reagan - Grant House]
Photograph of the front and west side of the "Grant House," a yellow, two-story, Queen Anne-style house located at 220 W. Reagan (on the corner of W. Reagan and S. May streets) in Palestine, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25921/
[220 W. Reagan - Grant House]
Photograph of the northwest corner of the "Grant House," a two-story, Queen Anne-style house located at 220 W. Reagan (on the corner of W. Reagan and S. May streets) in Palestine, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth9406/
[300 Block Avenue A]
Photograph of the former Palestine Herald building on the 300 Block of Avenue A in Palestine, Texas. It is a one-story, red-brick building with white masonry accents; the word "Herald" is in white stone in the center, near the top. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10434/
[301 S. Magnolia - Bowers Mansion]
Photograph of the front of the "Bowers Mansion" located at 301 S. Magnolia in Palestine, Texas. It is a two-story white house with blue trim that has Victorian Italiante-style architectural elements (including a small cupola with bracketed eaves and narrow, paired windows), and a two-tiered porch with Queen Anne-style turned- and jigsawn- wood trim. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26391/
[301 S. Magnolia - Bowers Mansion]
Photograph of the front of the "Bowers Mansion" located at 301 S. Magnolia in Palestine, Texas. It is a two-story white house with blue trim that has Victorian Italiante-style architectural elements (including a small cupola with bracketed eaves and narrow, paired windows), and a two-tiered porch with Queen Anne-style turned- and jigsawn- wood trim. Part of the yard is also visible, including a gazebo near the back of the house and a fountain in the front of the yard. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26390/
[301 S. Magnolia - Bowers Mansion]
Photograph of the front of the "Bowers Mansion" located at 301 S. Magnolia in Palestine, Texas. It is a two-story white house with blue trim that has Victorian Italiante-style architectural elements (including a small cupola with bracketed eaves and narrow, paired windows), and a two-tiered porch with Queen Anne-style turned- and jigsawn- wood trim. Part of the yard is also visible, including a gazebo near the back of the house and a fountain in the front of the yard. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26389/
[301 S. Magnolia - Bowers Mansion]
Photograph of the north and east sides of the "Bowers Mansion" located at 301 S. Magnolia in Palestine, Texas. It is a two-story house that has Victorian Italiante-style architectural elements (including a small cupola with bracketed eaves and narrow, paired windows), and a two-tiered porch with Queen Anne-style turned- and jigsawn- wood trim. This photo was taken from the corner of south Magnolia and west Bowers streets. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10058/
[301 W. Kolstad]
Photograph of the front and west side of a two-story red-brick building and parking lot located at 301 W. Kolstad in Palestine, Texas. There are two sets of stairs leading to the front entrance and the sign over the doors says "Grace United Methodist Church." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10265/
[301 W. Kolstad]
Photograph of the front and west side of a two-story red-brick building located at 301 W. Kolstad in Palestine, Texas. There are two sets of stairs leading to the front entrance and the sign over the doors says "Grace United Methodist Church." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10266/
[301 W. Oak]
Photograph of the front and side of a two-story commercial building located at 301 W. Oak in Palestine, Texas, taken from the corner of Oak and John streets. It is painted white and has masonry embellishments along the top of the building. There is a sidewalk cover across the front and a sign over the door says "The Linda Kay Shop;" mannequins are visible in the store windows. Part of an adjoining red-brick building is visible on the left side of the image. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10732/
[303 E. Kolstad]
The neighborhood north of Palestine’s central business district contains mostly houses erected during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This 2-story frame residence is a good and well-preserved example of such a dwelling, though it is more substantial in scale than most houses in the neighborhood. The exterior presents a balanced and orderly appearance that reflects the Classical Revival style. The house retains much of its historic character and integrity. Though this house probably dates to c.1900, city directory research was only able to trace its occupancy to 1926, when it was owned and occupied by Philip F. Crutchfield and his wife Minnie E. Before his death in the late 1930s, Mr. Crutchfield worked as a conductor for the I&GN Railroad, and later for Missouri Pacific. Mrs. Crutchfield continued to live in the house into the 1940s. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26618/
[303 E. Kolstad]
The neighborhood north of Palestine’s central business district contains mostly houses erected during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This 2-story frame residence is a good and well-preserved example of such a dwelling, though it is more substantial in scale than most houses in the neighborhood. The exterior presents a balanced and orderly appearance that reflects the Classical Revival style. The house retains much of its historic character and integrity. Though this house probably dates to c.1900, city directory research was only able to trace its occupancy to 1926, when it was owned and occupied by Philip F. Crutchfield and his wife Minnie E. Before his death in the late 1930s, Mr. Crutchfield worked as a conductor for the I&GN Railroad, and later for Missouri Pacific. Mrs. Crutchfield continued to live in the house into the 1940s. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25882/
[303 E Kolstad]
The neighborhood north of Palestine’s central business district contains mostly houses erected during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This 2-story frame residence is a good and well-preserved example of such a dwelling, though it is more substantial in scale than most houses in the neighborhood. The exterior presents a balanced and orderly appearance that reflects the Classical Revival style. The house retains much of its historic character and integrity. Though this house probably dates to c.1900, city directory research was only able to trace its occupancy to 1926, when it was owned and occupied by Philip F. Crutchfield and his wife Minnie E. Before his death in the late 1930s, Mr. Crutchfield worked as a conductor for the I&GN Railroad, and later for Missouri Pacific. Mrs. Crutchfield continued to live in the house into the 1940s. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26238/
[303 E. Kolstad]
The neighborhood north of Palestine’s central business district contains mostly houses erected during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This 2-story frame residence is a good and well-preserved example of such a dwelling, though it is more substantial in scale than most houses in the neighborhood. The exterior presents a balanced and orderly appearance that reflects the Classical Revival style. The house retains much of its historic character and integrity. Though this house probably dates to c.1900, city directory research was only able to trace its occupancy to 1926, when it was owned and occupied by Philip F. Crutchfield and his wife Minnie E. Before his death in the late 1930s, Mr. Crutchfield worked as a conductor for the I&GN Railroad, and later for Missouri Pacific. Mrs. Crutchfield continued to live in the house into the 1940s. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26236/
[303 E Kolstad]
The neighborhood north of Palestine’s central business district contains mostly houses erected during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This 2-story frame residence is a good and well-preserved example of such a dwelling, though it is more substantial in scale than most houses in the neighborhood. The exterior presents a balanced and orderly appearance that reflects the Classical Revival style. The house retains much of its historic character and integrity. Though this house probably dates to c.1900, city directory research was only able to trace its occupancy to 1926, when it was owned and occupied by Philip F. Crutchfield and his wife Minnie E. Before his death in the late 1930s, Mr. Crutchfield worked as a conductor for the I&GN Railroad, and later for Missouri Pacific. Mrs. Crutchfield continued to live in the house into the 1940s. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26237/
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