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  Partner: Palestine Public Library
[1011 N. Perry - Howard House]

[1011 N. Perry - Howard House]

Date: February 1993
Creator: Emrich, Ron
Description: The Howard House was the former home of Colonel George Howard and his wife, Cornelia Cox Howard. Built in 1851 the house is located on land deeded August 17, 1850 to Colonel Howard from Judge Reuben Reeves and his wife, Sarah. Colonel Howard and Mrs. Howard came to Palestine from Tennessee in 1849. Given the title of Colonel when he organized a company of men during the Civil War, he later served in the Texas Legislature, held several county offices and was Mayor of Palestine from 1886-1887. Colonel Howard was an active merchant in Palestine and in 1855 his store was located on the east side of the courthouse square. The Howard House of Greek revival influence is one of the best preserved examples of the ante bellum homes in the city. A walk of handmade brick leads to the house with its pillared portico and a center hall runs through the house with rooms on either side. There are a number of furnishings and other interesting items which are original to the house including a beautifully carved piano. The home remained in the possession of descendants of the Howard family until it was purchased by the City of Palestine ...
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
[1003 N. Link - H.H. Link House]

[1003 N. Link - H.H. Link House]

Date: February 1993
Creator: Goebel, Matt
Description: Photograph of the front and south side of the "H.H. Link House" located at 1003 N. Link in Palestine, Texas. It is a two-story, white house with both Queen Anne and Classical Revival-style architectures, including two-story Ionic columns across the front. Scaffolding is visible around the front and side as part of renovations.
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
[1005 N. Queen - P.A. Kolstad House]

[1005 N. Queen - P.A. Kolstad House]

Date: February 1993
Creator: Goebel, Matt
Description: This 2-story frame dwelling is indicative of the kind of house many of Palestine’s more affluent families built during the late 19th century. Stylistically, the house is a hybrid of Italianate and Queen Anne styles, both of which were popular in Palestine during the Victorian area. The pedimented architraves above the windows and the bracketed eaves reflect an influence of the Italianate style, while the turned woodwork of the porch is usually associated with Queen Anne architecture. The original owners of this house were Peter Andrew Kolstad (1856-1922) and his wife Mollie Groth Kolstad (1860-1945), member of one of Palestine’s most prominent early families. Mr. Kolstad was the son of Soren and Ingeborg Kolstad, Norwegian immigrants who settled in Texas around 1853. This house was probably built in the early 1880’s. P.A. Kolstad and his wife lived here together until his death in 1922. Mollie Kolstad continued to live in the house until her own death in the mid-1940’s.
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
[925 N. Sycamore - McKenna House]

[925 N. Sycamore - McKenna House]

Date: February 1993
Creator: Goebel, Matt
Description: Photograph of the front and south side of a one-story, L-plan house located at 925 N. Sycamore in Palestine, Texas. It has Queen Anne-style details including a tower at the southeast corner of the front porch.
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
[107 E. Kolstad - Gaught House]

[107 E. Kolstad - Gaught House]

Date: February 1993
Creator: Goebel, Matt
Description: This house is an anomaly among historic residences in Palestine and defies classification. Local contractor John H. Gaught built this house in the early 1910’s, to plans by prominent architect James F. Brook. Gaught was responsible for the construction of some of Palestine’s most notable buildings, including the Redlands Hotel and the Centenary Methodist Church. According to deed records, Gaught sold the house to John R. Hearne, Jr., in January 1914. Hearne was a salesman at the Palestine Hardware Company who lived here with his wife, Clara Welborn, until 1945, when W.T. Lively acquired the building. Lively continued to occupy the house through 1971, and was responsible for the building’s rear addition. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
[922 N. Link - Joost Ozment House]

[922 N. Link - Joost Ozment House]

Date: February 1993
Creator: Goebel, Matt
Description: In contrast to the asymmetrical forms and eclectic character of many houses of the Victorian era, residences of the 1900s and 1910s typically had more balanced and orderly exteriors. This 2-story frame house provides a vivid illustration of this trend in residential architectural history. The property is virtually unaltered, with its historic character and integrity largely intact. This house was originally built as a small one-story dwelling in the 1870s by Albert A. Joost, the son of Palestine’s first merchant. Tennessee-native James Wisdom Ozment (1842-1918) bought the house about 1910 and hired builder William Kraus to move the original structure back from the street and substantially enlarge it into a grand two-story dwelling with a classical façade. Ozment was an extremely important figure in mid and late 19th century Palestine: a member of the first city council, he was instrumental in helping restore power to local citizens in the aftermath of the Civ8il War and the occupation of Palestine by the carpetbaggers. He was the first president of Palestine National Bank, which opened in 1890. Ozment operated a dry goods store on the courthouse square and had substantial real estate holdings; in addition, he expanded the city’s first telephone service ...
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
[839 N. Tennessee]

[839 N. Tennessee]

Date: February 1993
Creator: Emrich, Ron
Description: Photograph of a one-story, white, L-plan frame house located at 839 N. Tennessee in Palestine, Texas. It has a large bay window on the left side of the house and Queen Ann-style embellishments along the roofline and the porch.
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
[315 E. Kolstad - Greenwood House]

[315 E. Kolstad - Greenwood House]

Date: February 1993
Creator: Goebel, Matt
Description: During the late 19th and very early 20th centuries, the Queen Anne style enjoyed considerable popularity locally, especially among more affluent citizens. This large, 2-story frame residence is one such example, although the application of asbestos siding over the wood siding detracts from the property’s overall historic character. Other than the new siding, the house appears to have changed little since its construction in 1903. Judge Thomas Benton Greenwood (1832-1900) and his wife Lucy Henry Gee built a one-story house on this site in the 1870s, which later was enlarged into the present 2-story building around the turn of the century. A native of Mississippi and a Confederate veteran, Mr. Greenwood was a prominent Palestine lawyer during the last quarter of the nineteenth century. In 1872 he formed a law partnership with John Young Gooch (later a state senator); subsequently, the two men formed a law firm with John H. Reagan, the former Postmaster General of the Confederacy and U.S. congressman. Dr. Bethune F. McDonald, a physician and surgeon with offices at 103 ½ W. Oak, purchased this house in 1935. He and his wife Josephine continued to live here through the early 1940s, when Mr. McDonald died. Mrs. McDonald ...
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
[200 Block S. Magnolia]

[200 Block S. Magnolia]

Date: February 1993
Creator: Goebel, Matt
Description: This photo was taken from the west side of S. Magnolia Street, just south of the railroad tracks, with the camera facing north. The houses are (from right to left) 216 S. Magnolia, 212 S. Magnolia, 208 S. Magnolia (Verda's Flower Shop) and 204 S. Magnolia.
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
[700 Block S. Sycamore]

[700 Block S. Sycamore]

Date: February 1993
Creator: Moore, David
Description: Photograph of the west side of the 700 Block of S. Sycamore from the intersection of S. Sycamore Street and Neches Streets, looking toward the north. The houses in the picture are (from left to right) 717 S. Sycamore and 713 S. Sycamore.
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library