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  Partner: Palestine Public Library
 Resource Type: Photograph
[102 E. Ezell]
Photograph of 102 E. Ezell taken from the road. Photo was taken for the Historic Resources Survey of Palestine, Texas 1989-1991. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10344/
104 E. Park Avenue
Photograph of a two-story, red brick house with white trim, located at 104 E. Park Avenue in Palestine, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10718/
[105 E. Main]
Photograph of 105 E. Main taken from the road. Photo was taken for the Historic Resources Survey of Palestine, Texas 1989-1991. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10149/
[105 W. Green]
Photograph of the front of a single-story, L-plan house located at 105 W. Green in Palestine, Texas. The house is blue with white accents and has a front- and side-facing gabled roof. Noteworthy features include the porch with its slender classically-inspired columns and the oculus window in the front gable end. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10324/
[105 W. Green]
Photograph of the front of a single-story, L-plan house located at 105 W. Green in Palestine, Texas. The house is blue with white accents and has a front- and side-facing gabled roof. Noteworthy features include the porch with its slender classically-inspired columns and the oculus window in the front gable end. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10323/
[105 W. Main]
Photograph of 105 W. Main taken from the road. Photo was taken for the Historic Resources Survey of Palestine, Texas 1989-1991. At one time this building housed the Fotopolos Shoe Store. That business has since closed. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10147/
[107 E. Kolstad - Gaught House]
Photograph of 107 E. Kolstad taken from the road. Photo was taken for the Historic Resources Survey of Palestine, Texas 1989-1991. This house is an anomaly among historic residences in Palestine and defies classification. Local contractor John H. Gaught built this house in the early 1910s, to plans by prominent architect James F. Brook. Gaught was responsible for the construction of some of Palestine’s most notable buildings, including the Redlands Hotel. According to deed records, Gaught sold the house to John R. Hearne, Jr., in January 1914. Hearne was a salesman at the Palestine Hardware Company who lived there with his wife, Clara Welborn, until 1945, when W.T. Lively acquired the building. Lively continued to occupy the house through 1971, and was responsible for the building’s rear addition. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10279/
[107 E. Kolstad - Gaught House]
This house is an anomaly among historic residences in Palestine and defies classification. Local contractor John H. Gaught built this house in the early 1910’s, to plans by prominent architect James F. Brook. Gaught was responsible for the construction of some of Palestine’s most notable buildings, including the Redlands Hotel and the Centenary Methodist Church. According to deed records, Gaught sold the house to John R. Hearne, Jr., in January 1914. Hearne was a salesman at the Palestine Hardware Company who lived here with his wife, Clara Welborn, until 1945, when W.T. Lively acquired the building. Lively continued to occupy the house through 1971, and was responsible for the building’s rear addition. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth9429/
[107 E. Park Avenue]
Photograph of a 1 ½-story, brick, Tudor Revival-style house located at 107 E. Park Avenue in Palestine, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10717/
[107 W. Crawford]
Photograph of 107 W. Crawford taken from the road. Photo was taken for the Historic Resources Survey of Palestine, Texas 1989-1991. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10374/
109 E. Spring
Photograph of a red-brick building located at 109 E. Spring in Palestine, Texas. The windows have logos for Toledo Finance and a sign over the door says "Toledo Loans." On the left of the building, an alley with a fire escape and part of a white stone building are visible. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10565/
[110 E. Davis]
Photograph of 110 E. Davis taken from the road. Photo was taken for the Historic Resources Survey of Palestine, Texas 1989-1991. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10355/
[110 E. Pine]
Photograph of the front of a blue, modified L-plan house located at 110 E. Pine in Palestine, Texas. It has Queen Anne-style trim on the gable end and around the porch. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10677/
[111 Angelina - Pentecom LLC]
Located at the northwest corner of Angelina and Royall streets, it was at one time the Medical Center Pharmacy. As of August 2006, the building houses the offices of Pentecom LLC. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth9422/
[111 E. Pine]
Photograph of the front and east side of a one-story house located at 111 E. Pine in Palestine, Texas. The house is located on a hill and is made of red brick with a front porch that wraps around one corner of the house. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10676/
[111 E. Pine]
Photograph of the front and west side of a house at 111 E. Pine in Palestine, Texas. The house is made of red brick and is located on a slight hill. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10675/
[111 W. Spring]
Photograph of the front of "The Hinzie Building" located at 111 W. Spring in Palestine, Texas. It is a two-story, white, brick building with Victorian Italianate-style embellishments, including segmented-arched hoodmolds, quoins along the side of the front, and an elaborately detailed parapet. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10564/
[112-114 W. Dallas - Duplex]
Photograph of 14 W. Dallas taken from the road. Photo was taken for the Historic Resources Survey of Palestine, Texas 1989-1991. Most of the city’s modified L-plan houses have Queen Anne-style features; however, this modest dwelling has a wrap-around porch with Doric columns that are suggestive of the Classical Revival style. The duplex has changed little since its construction and remains a good example of a vernacular house of the early 20th century. According to city directories, this houses were occupied by a rapid succession of renters during their early years. Some of these included G.S. Bryant, a superintendent at the Palestine Oil Mill Fertilizer Company, and his wife Sallie, in 1926; Webster H. and Ola Connor in 1935; and C.B. Blanakin, a brakeman for Missouri Pacific, and his wife Beatrice, in 1941. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10359/
[112-114 W. Dallas - Duplex]
Photograph of 14 W. Dallas taken from the road. Photo was taken for the Historic Resources Survey of Palestine, Texas 1989-1991. Most of the city’s modified L-plan houses have Queen Anne-style features; however, this modest dwelling has a wrap-around porch with Doric columns that are suggestive of the Classical Revival style. The duplex has changed little since its construction and remains a good example of a vernacular house of the early 20th century. According to city directories, this houses were occupied by a rapid succession of renters during their early years. Some of these included G.S. Bryant, a superintendent at the Palestine Oil Mill Fertilizer Company, and his wife Sallie, in 1926; Webster H. and Ola Connor in 1935; and C.B. Blanakin, a brakeman for Missouri Pacific, and his wife Beatrice, in 1941. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10360/
112 E. Reagan
Photograph of a white two-story house with dark trim, located at 112 E. Reagan, in Palestine, texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10627/
[112 W. Kolstad]
Photograph of 112 W. Kolstad taken from the road. Photo was taken for the Historic Resources Survey of Palestine, Texas 1989-1991. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10271/
[113 E. Crawford - First Christian Church]
Photograph of E. Crawford taken from the road. Photo was taken for the Historic Resources Survey of Palestine, Texas 1989-1991. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10378/
[115 E. Kolstad]
Photograph of 115 E. Kolstad taken from the road. Photo was taken for the Historic Resources Survey of Palestine, Texas 1989-1991. This property demonstrates how architectural changes over 50 years old can become architecturally significant. The building was originally a modified L-plan house erected in 1914, but was remodeled in the 1930s to its present Tudor Revival-style appearance. The steeply pitched hipped roof with gabled extensions reflect the original modified L-plan configuration; however, the brick veneer, faux half-timbering and entrance bay with round-arched openings and stucco and brick exterior finish are indicative of the Tudor Revival style. The 1930s changes are an important part of the building’s architectural evolution. According to the current owner, this house was built in 1914 by George M. and Pearl Welborn, who continued to live there through 1980. City directories for 1935-36 and 1941-42 confirm this, though the 1926-27 city directory does not list this address. Mr. Welborn was a cotton buyer. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10278/
115 W. Spring
Photograph of a building located at 115 W. Spring Street in Palestine, Texas. The building is two stories, located between two red-brick buildings. The lower portion of the building is painted blue and shaded by an awning; the upper portion of the building is brick, painted white, and has tall windows with decorative stonework around them. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10563/
[116 E. Pine]
Photograph of 116 E. Pine taken from the road. Photo was taken for the Historic Resources Survey of Palestine, Texas 1989-1991. The residential neighborhood north of the city’s central business district developed principally during the late 19th and 20th centuries; however, this area also contains many houses erected during the 1910s and 1920s. This property, which is indicative of the latter, is a well-preserved example of a Craftsman bungalow, the most common type of pre- World War II dwelling in Palestine. Although many other illustrations survive (the histories resources survey identified over 800 such buildings), this property is significant because it exhibits fine workmanship and because it remains in a virtually unaltered state. According to the Palestine city directories, John Orin Cutter and his wife Johnnie had this house built around 1915. John Cutter passed away in the 1960's and his wife lived here until approximately 1980. Mr. Cutter was a secretary and treasurer, and later a manager, for the Bratton Drug Company, located downtown at 101-03 W. Oak. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10674/
[116 N. Sycamore - Colley Wright Building]
Photo of the Colley Wright building, that once sat at the east side of the intersection of Spring street at Sycamore. This building was removed when Spring Street was widened and extended down to Crockett Road. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26266/
[117 W. Kolstad]
Photograph of 117 W. Kolstad taken from the road. Photo was taken for the Historic Resources Survey of Palestine, Texas 1989-1991. Palestine contains less than a dozen of 2-story houses that are relatively narrow and deep when compared to other historic residences in the city. The proportions of the building resemble those of the shotgun, which typically is a small 1-story building. Perhaps the most distinctive feature, besides the plan and 2-story height, is the 2-tiered porch. The exposed rafter ends and box columns are indicative of the Craftsman movement and suggest a circa 1920 construction date. Only minor modifications, such as the screening of the second floor porch, detract from the property’s integrity. The current owner notes that this house was built in the early 1920s as apartments by Mrs. Kate Turner. City directories for 1926 do not list the dwelling; by 1935, however, they show that W. Reed Lowrey and his wife Helen lived here. By 1941 the house was occupied by Earl L. Belt, the manager of the Pratt Jewelry Company, and his wife Billie. The current owner also notes that the house was converted from apartments into a single-family dwelling sometime in the 1970s. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10270/
117 W. Spring
Photograph of a brick building located at 117 W. Spring in Palestine, Texas. A street sign and several decorative shrubs are visible to the left. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10562/
[121 E. Pine]
Photograph of the front and east side of a two-story, L-plan house located at 121 E. Pine in Palestine, Texas. It has some Queen Anne-style details including the elaborate woodwork on the porch. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10673/
[121 E. Pine]
Photograph of the front of a two-story, L-plan house located at 121 E. Pine in Palestine, Texas. It has some Queen Anne-style details including the elaborate woodwork on the porch. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10672/
[122 E. Palestine Ave]
Photograph of 122 E. Palestine taken from the road for the Historic Resources Survey of Palestine, Texas 1989-1991. This building is located on the southwest corner of East Palestine Avenue and Fowler Street. It is painted yellow with red and green trim; a sign in the yard says "Finley Real Estate." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10726/
[122 E. Pine]
Photograph of the front and east side of a one-story, modified L-plan frame house located at 122 E. Pine in Palestine, Texas. It has Queen Anne-style ornamentation on the front porch, including turned-wood supports and a porch frieze. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10671/
[200 Block S. Magnolia]
This photo was taken from the west side of S. Magnolia Street, just south of the railroad tracks, with the camera facing north. The houses are (from right to left) 216 S. Magnolia, 212 S. Magnolia, 208 S. Magnolia (Verda's Flower Shop) and 204 S. Magnolia. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth9425/
[200 Block W. Crawford]
Photograph of the 200 Block W. Crawford taken from the road. Photo was taken for the Historic Resources Survey of Palestine, Texas 1989-1991. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10371/
[200 S. Crockett - Neches Depot]
Photograph of 200 S. Crockett taken from the road. Photo was taken for the Historic Resources Survey of Palestine, Texas 1989-1991. This building, with Stick Style architectural elements, is typical of the kind of depots railroads erected during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. A systematic statewide survey of these kinds of properties has not been completed, but most appear to have been razed or moved to sites away from their original locations adjacent to railroad tracks. Although the railroad played such a pivotal role in Palestine’s development, no other historic railroad-related buildings survive in the city. This was not the depot that was in Palestine. This depot was moved from Neches to a park area located at 200 S. Crockett Road in Palestine and moved once again in the summer of 2004 to the corner of Spring Street and W. Oak Street. It now serves as the Palestine Tourism Office. This photo was taken when the depot was still located at 200 S. Crockett Road. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10368/
[200 S. Crockett - Neches Depot]
Photograph of 200 S. Crockett taken from the road. Photo was taken for the Historic Resources Survey of Palestine, Texas 1989-1991. This building, with Stick Style architectural elements, is typical of the kind of depots railroads erected during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. A systematic statewide survey of these kinds of properties has not been completed, but most appear to have been razed or moved to sites away from their original locations adjacent to railroad tracks. Although the railroad played such a pivotal role in Palestine’s development, no other historic railroad-related buildings survive in the city. This was not the depot that was in Palestine. This depot was moved from Neches to a park area located at 200 S. Crockett Road in Palestine and moved once again in the summer of 2004 to the corner of Spring Street and W. Oak Street. It now serves as the Tourism Office. This picture was taken when the depot was still located at 200 S. Crockett Road. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10369/
[201 E. Kolstad]
Photograph of 201 E. Kolstad taken from the road. Photo was taken for the Historic Resources Survey of Palestine, Texas 1989-1991. Despite the application of siding over the original wooden exterior sheathing, this house is a noteworthy example of the Queen Anne style. The corner tower, with its conical roof, is perhaps the single most distinctive architectural element. The earliest known occupant of this house was James E. Copeland, who lived here from as early as 1930 through at least 1936. At that time, Mr. Copeland was the proprietor of the Copeland Jewelry Store, located downtown at 301 W. Oak. By 1937 the house was owned and occupied by L.J. Bilberry, and by the early 1940s the house was vacant. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10277/
[201 E. Kolstad]
This house is a noteworthy example of the Queen Anne style. The corner tower, with its conical roof, is perhaps the single most distinctive architectural element. The earliest known occupant of this house was James E. Copeland and his wife Trudie Ezell, who lived here from as early as 1902 through at least 1936. At that time, Mr. Copeland was the proprietor of the Copeland Jewelry Store, located downtown at 301 W. Oak. Mr. Copeland was also the official time keeper for the railroad. By 1937 the house was owned and occupied by L.J. Bilberry, a son-in-law of the Copelands, and by the early 1940s the house was vacant. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26615/
[201 E. Oak - Ivanhoe Lodge No. 15 - Knights of Pythias Hall]
Photograph of 201 E. Oak taken from the road. Photo was taken for the Historic Resources Survey of Palestine, Texas 1989-1991. As per the 1898-1899 Palestine City Directory, this was the home of the Knights of Pythias. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10079/
[201 E. Oak - Ivanhoe Lodge No. 15 - Knights of Pythias Hall]
Photograph of 201 E. Oak taken from the road. Photo was taken for the Historic Resources Survey of Palestine, Texas 1989-1991. As per the 1898-1899 Palestine City Directory, this was the home of the Knights of Pythias. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10078/
[201 S. Michaux]
Photograph of 201 S. Michaux taken from the road. Photo was taken for the Historic Resources Survey of Palestine, Texas 1989-1991. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10120/
[201 W. Crawford]
Photograph of the front and side of the "Denby Building," located at 201 W. Crawford in downtown Palestine, Texas. It is a three-story red-brick building, classified as a "Two-Part Commercial Block," that has grouped pivoting windows on the upper floors, and side-facing brickwork in the parapet. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10370/
[201 W. Crawford - Denby Bldg]
Photograph of the front and side of the "Denby Building," located at 201 W. Crawford in downtown Palestine, Texas. It is a three-story brick building, classified as a "Two-Part Commercial Block," that has grouped pivoting windows on the upper floors, and side-facing brickwork in the parapet. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth9399/
[201 W. Kolstad]
Photograph of the southeast corner of a one-story, brick-veneer house with Tudor Revival-style architecture located at 201 W. Kolstad in Palestine, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10268/
[201 W. Kolstad]
Photograph of the southwest corner of a one-story, brick-veneer house with Tudor Revival-style architecture located at 201 W. Kolstad in Palestine, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10269/
[201 W. Main]
Photograph of 201 W. Main taken from the road. Photo was taken for the Historic Resources Survey of Palestine, Texas 1989-1991. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10146/
[202 E. Palestine]
Photograph of the front of a white, two-story frame Queen Anne-style house located at 202 E. Palestine in Palestine, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10725/
[204 S. Magnolia]
Photograph of 204 S. Magnolia taken from the road. Photo was taken for the Historic Resources Survey of Palestine, Texas 1989-1991. The Queen Anne style was enormously popular in Palestine during the late 19th century, and the residential neighborhood south of the central business district contains numerous examples of the style. Few of the buildings, however, retain their integrity to such a noteworthy degree as this house. J.M. and Mattie H. McMillan were the earliest known residents of this house, which was probably constructed around the turn of the century. The McMillans lived here as early as 1926, according to city directories. By 1935, however, Mr. McMillan, who had been an engineer for the I&GN Railroad, had died; his wife continued to live in the house through the early 1940s. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10198/
[204 S. Magnolia]
Photograph of 204 S. Magnolia taken from the road. Photo was taken for the Historic Resources Survey of Palestine, Texas 1989-1991. The Queen Anne style was enormously popular in Palestine during the late 19th century, and the residential neighborhood south of the central business district contains numerous examples of the style. Few of the buildings, however, retain their integrity to such a noteworthy degree as this house. J.M. and Mattie H. McMillan were the earliest known residents of this house, which was probably constructed around the turn of the century. The McMillans lived here as early as 1926, according to city directories. By 1935, however, Mr. McMillan, who had been an engineer for the I&GN Railroad, had died; his wife continued to live in the house through the early 1940s. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10197/
[205 E. Dallas]
Photograph of 205 E. Dallas taken from the road. Photo was taken for the Historic Resources Survey of Palestine, Texas 1989-1991. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth10361/