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  Partner: Tarrant County College NE, Heritage Room
 County: Parker County, TX
Edmond and Flossie Longley
Edmond and Flossie Dickie Cox Longley texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20525/
Emma Carter Owens
Emma Carter Owens standing beside her home in her wedding dress texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth27804/
First Group of Men Drafted from Weatherford
First group of men drafted from Weatherford in group picture on September 16, 1918. Men are identified on picture insert. This group of men trained at Camp Bowie. James C. Owens is among this group. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth27826/
Fort Parker
Photograph of a corner section of Fort Parker. This segment appears to be constructed entirely of logs including the fence and corner tower. Old Fort Parker is a reconstructed fort that pays tribute to the Parker family and other pioneers who paid a high price to settle in Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28022/
Fort Parker
Portion of the interior of the fort is shown. Old Fort Parker is a reconstructed fort that pays tribute to the Parker family and other pioneers who paid a high price to settle in Texas. The Parkers and other members of their church came to Texas from Crawford County, Illinois in 1833. In 1832, Daniel Parker, a staunch theologian, had gained permission to settle in Texas. After organizing those who wanted to go to Texas into the Predestinarian Baptist Church, they all left Illinois in July of 1833 in ox- drawn wagons. Daniel and the majority of his followers settled near the present City of Elkhart, where a replica of their Pilgrim Baptist Church still stands in their memory. Other members of the group preferred to settle farther west, near the Navasota River. Elder John Parker and three of his sons (Silas, James, and Benjamin) began in December 1833 to clear land and to construct "Parker's Fort." On May 19, 1836, Comanche Indians attacked the fort; 5 were killed, 5 were captured, and the 21 survivors made their way to where Palestine is today. The most famous of the captives was Cynthia Ann Parker. She adapted to Indian ways and later married Chief Peta Nocona. Quanah Parker, the last great Comanche chief, who was involved in the Battle of Palo Duro Canyon, was the most famous of their three children. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28015/
Fort Parker Stela
Granite stela with description and significance of Fort Parker inscribed on the stone, situated outside of the Forts walls. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28097/
James Allison Owens
Portrait of James Allison Owens, father of James Powell Owens. He was born in Riceville, Tenn. on Nov. 26, 1866. He was the grandfather of James Couts Owens. He moved to Weatherford in May of 1894. He is buried in Weatherford Cemetery. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth27796/
James Allison Owens Family
James Allison Owens, his wife Elizabeth Ann Buckner Owens and their family and many relatives. Members are listed on isert. The picture was made at the Owens farm near Riceville, Tenn. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth27793/
James C. Owens Standing at the Historical Marker of Oliver Loving
James C. Owens at historical marker of his Great Grandfather, Oliver Loving, about 1973 texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth27787/
James P. Owens and P. Monroe Buckner
James P. Owens and P. Monroe "Roe" Buckner, in their Texas Frontier Guard uniforms texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth27816/
James Powell Owens
Portrait of James Powell Owens, father of J.C. Owens. He devised a system of encoding checks to send them to proper banks. He also set up codes that are still in use today. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth27802/
James Powell Owens
Portrait of James Powell Owens wearing the uniform of the Texas Frontier Guard about 1887-1888. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth27785/
James Powell Owens on His Bicycle
James Powell Owens on his bicycle, the first bicycle in Weatherford, at that time. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth27829/
D. LaFayette Buckner
Portrait of D. LaFayette Buckner. He was the brother of Elizabeth Ann Buckner Owens. He was the father of Dr. Ed Buckner texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth27782/
Mary Roach Owens and Edna Roach Fitzgerald
Portraits of Mary Roach Owens and her cousin, Edna Roach Fitzgerald. The ribbon on Mary's left side is for the Young Women's Christian Temperance Union. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth27812/
Mary Roach Owens and Edna Roach Fitzgerald
Portraits of Mary Roach Owens and her cousin, Edna Roach Fitzgerald. Mary was the mother of J.C. Owens. She was the wife of J.P. Owens. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth27808/
Monument Marking the Grave of Isaac Parker
Monument marking the grave of Isaac Parker (Apr. 7, 1793-Aprl 14, 1883), in Turner Cemetery. Parker County is named for him. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth27887/
Monument Marking the Site of Isaac Parker's Home
Isaac Parker (April 7, 1793 – April 14, 1883) is the son of John and Sarah Parker. He served under Andrew Jackson in the Creek Wars. He served in Captain Elisha Clapp's Company in 1836 and in 1841 participated in the Village Creek fight with the Indians in Tarrant County. He helped bury John B. Denton, who was killed in the fight. Isaac was a member of the Texas House from 1838-1841. He introduced the legislation creating Parker County. Senator Jefferson Weatherford introduced the bill in the Senate. Parker moved to Parker County in 1872 and settled on a farm eight miles northeast of Weatherford. He died there on April 14, 1883. The monument says: "Pioneer, soldier, and law maker. Born April 7, 1793 in Elbert County, Georgia. Came to Texas in 1833. Served in Elisha Clapp's Company in 1836. Member of Congress of the Republic of Texas 1839 - 1845; of the Constitutional Convention in 1845. State Senator. Died April 14, 1883, in Parker County." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28213/
Monument of a Parker Family Member
Monument, at Turner Cemetery, marking the grave of one of the members of the Parker family . The cemetery is located at the NE edge of Lake Weatherford. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth27888/
Monuments at Turner Cemetery
Approximately 12 monuments marking graves in Turner Cemetery, located near Lake Weatherford. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth27886/
Monuments in Turner Cemetery
Monuments in Turner Cemetery texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth27889/
Plowing on Frank Brawley Farm
Two unidentified plowmen in the field at Frank Brawley's farm in Robert's community, about 12 miles north of Weatherford;it is in Parker County as is Weatherford. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28254/
Quanah Parker
Portrait of Quanah Parker, last chief of the Comanches texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth27775/
Quanah Parker and One of His Wives
Quanah Parker and one of his wives in front of their teepee texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth27778/
Roach Owens and James C. Owens
Roach Owens, born Jan. 29, 1889 and James C. Owens, born May 29, 1894. The picture was taken in Colorado in 1895. Roach Owens as a child. James Owens as a baby texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth27790/
Susan Doggett Morgan
Portrait of Susan Doggett Morgan, wife of Oliver Loving. She was great-great-great grandmother of Tom McGifford's wife Martha Tate McGifford. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth27798/
Three Plowmen Standing beside Their Team on Frank Brawley Farm
Three Plowmen Standing beside Their Team on Frank Brawley Farm in Roberts community, located 12 miles north of Weatherford. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28253/
Tombstone of Adam Parker
Tombstone of Adam Parker in Parker Cemetery. Adam Parker was the son of Isaac and Virginia Parker. He was born June 15, 1877 and died May 2, 1908. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth27910/
Tombstone of Rebecca Parker Boone Rawlins
Tombstone of Rebecca Parker Boone Rawlins (1871-1956) in Turner Cemetery texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth27890/
Unmarked Grave in Turner Cemetery
Stones piled up to form the boundaries of a gravesite at Turner Cemetery texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth27891/
Women in the Woodman's Circle
Women in the Woodman's Circle in front of a building that is a combination general store and a lodge hall. The building was located on the Brawley homestead in the Roberts community in Northern Parker County. The lower half of the building housed a general store, which was run by Oscar Hill. The upper half served as the meeting hall for the Woodsmen of the World Lodge. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth27920/