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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 County: Erath County, TX
Chapel on the Bosque, Stephenville Museum
Photograph of the Chapel on the Bosque, originally the Stephenville Presbyterian Church in Stephenville, Texas. The church is all white and has a round tower with a steeple. There is a fence with a hedge surrounding the chapel in the foreground. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth5794/
Cow sign, $233,000,000.00 in Milk Sales Annually
Photograph of a sign in Stephenville advertising local dairy industry statistics. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth5808/
Dr. Pepper Billboard
Photograph of an advertising billboard near the Dublin Dr. Pepper Museum and Old Doc's Soda Shop in Dublin, TX. The girl on the swing moves forward and back. She is Pretty Peggy Pepper, a woman chosen yearly as the plant’s goodwill ambassador. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth14399/
Dr. Pepper Billboard
Photograph of an advertising billboard near the Dublin Dr. Pepper Museum and Old Doc's Soda Shop in Dublin, TX. The girl on the swing moves forward and back. She is Pretty Peggy Pepper, a woman chosen yearly as the plant’s goodwill ambassador. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth14398/
Dr. Pepper Billboard
Photograph of an advertising billboard near the Dublin Dr. Pepper Museum and Old Doc's Soda Shop in Dublin, TX. The girl on the swing moves forward and back. She is Pretty Peggy Pepper, a woman chosen yearly as the plant’s goodwill ambassador. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth14397/
Dr. Pepper Museum and Soda Shop
Photograph of the Dublin Dr. Pepper Museum and Old Doc's Soda Shop in Dublin, TX. In front of the building is a statue, "Sweet Inspirations" depicting the plant's owner, Bill Kloster -- "Mr. Dr Pepper" -- offering a bottle of Dr. Pepper to a little girl. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth14400/
Dr. Pepper Museum and Soda Shop
Photograph of the Dublin Dr. Pepper Museum and Old Doc's Soda Shop in Dublin, TX. In front of the building is a statue, "Sweet Inspirations" depicting the plant's owner, Bill Kloster -- "Mr. Dr Pepper" -- offering a bottle of Dr. Pepper to a little girl. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth14401/
Dr. Pepper Museum in Dublin
Photograph of the Dublin Dr. Pepper Museum and Old Doc's Soda Shop in Dublin, TX. In front of the building is a statue, "Sweet Inspirations" depicting the plant's owner, Bill Kloster -- "Mr. Dr Pepper" -- offering a bottle of Dr. Pepper to a little girl. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth5791/
Dr. Pepper sign in Dublin, Texas
Photograph of an advertising billboard for Dr. Pepper in Dublin. The girl on the swing actually swings back and forth. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth5792/
Dublin Train Depot
Photograph looking across the tracks at the Dublin train depot in Dublin, TX. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth14402/
Dublin Train Depot
Photograph looking across the tracks at the Dublin train depot in Dublin, TX. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth14403/
Erath County Courthouse, Stephenville
Photograph of the Erath County Courthouse in Stephenville. It is a four-story building made of red and white stones with a clock tower at the top. There is a flagpole in front of the building, and trees on the lawn on either side of the entrance. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth5809/
Erath County Courthouse, Stephenville
Photograph of the Erath County Courthouse in Stephenville. It is a four-story building made of red and white stones with a clock tower at the top. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth5800/
Erath County Courthouse, Stephenville. Clock tower detail
Photograph of the clock tower at the Erath County Courthouse in Stephenville at 12:50 p.m. The building is made of white and red stones, and the clock tower has a green roof. There are clock faces on each side of the tower. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth5801/
Erath County Courthouse, Stephenville, Clock tower detail
Photograph of the clock tower of the Erath County Courthouse in Stephenville. It has a clock on each side of the tower. The building is made of red and white stones. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth5802/
Erath County Courthouse, Stephenville, Interior stone tower wall
Photograph looking up at the interior tower wall of the Erath County Courthouse in Stephenville. The wall is made entirely of stone, and there is a wooden staircase leading upwards at the top of the photo. There are also several lamps on the two floors visible. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth5806/
Erath County Courthouse, Stephenville, Interior stone tower wall
Photograph of the interior tower wall of the Erath County Courthouse in Stephenville. The inside of the building is made of stone, and there is a wooden staircase leading to upper levels. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth5805/
Erath County Courthouse, Stephenville, Interior tower view
Photograph of the interior tower view of the Erath County Courthouse in Stephenville, showing staircases and stone walls. The photo was taken looking straight up. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth5807/
Erath County Courthouse, Stephenville, Interior window detail
Photograph of three windows, taken from inside the Erath County Courthouse in Stephenville. The windows are arched, and set into a stone wall. A lamp is visible through the middle window. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth5804/
Erath County Honor Roll Memorial
Photograph of the Erath County Honor Roll Memorial, for casualties of WWI and WWII. It is a stone with names engraved into it, and an American flag placed behind it. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth5797/
Erath County Veterans Memorial
Photograph of the Erath County Veterans Memorial. It is made of three stones. The largest, middle stone reads: "Erath County honors its veterans of WWI, WWII, Korea, Vietnam, Desert Storm and other military actions." The left stone says "Duty, Honor, Country," and the right says "Our men and women of the Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, Coast Guard, Merchant Marines." A line of text at the bottom of the memorial declares that it was "Donated by citizens, businesses, and organizations of Erath County." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth5798/
First National Bank building, Stephenville
Photograph of the old First National Bank building in Stephenville, which currently houses the law office of Boyd Waggoner. It is a stone building, with a tower above the entrance. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth5803/
Historic plaque - Thurber
Photograph of a historic plaque in Thurber, Texas. It reads: "Thurber. Most important mine site in Texas for 30 years. Coal here, probably known to Indians, was "discovered" in 1886 by W. W. Johnson, who with his brother Harvey sold out to Texas & Pacific Coal Company in 1888. (T. & P. Coal Company provided fuel for the Texas & Pacific Railroad, but was independently owned. Town was named for H. K. Thurber, friend of T. & P. Coal Company founders. Most dynamic firm member was Robert D. Hunter (1833 - 1902), developer of 7 of 15 mines. Next president was E. L. Marston, Hunter's son-in-law, who left mining largely to William K. Gordon (1862 - 1949), an engineer who brought daily output to 3,000 tons. Then in 1917, Gordon (backed by management of coal company) was primarily responsible for discovery of Range Oil Field, 20 miles west. Adoption of oil-burning railway locomotives cut demand for coal. Last mine here closed in 1921, and the 10,000 or more inhabitants of Thurber began to move away. The coal firm changed its name to Texas Pacific Coal and Oil Company and was sold in 1963 to Joseph E. Seagram & Sons, Inc., for $277,000,000.00. Renamed Texas Pacific Oil Company, it is no one of the largest independent domestic energy suppliers. Much coal (by estimate 127,000,000 tons) remains underground. (1969)" texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth5220/
Major George B. Erath Monument
Photograph of a monument in honor of Major George B. Erath, erected by the Sons and Daughters of Confederate Veterans in 2001. A picture of a Confederate and Texas flags are crossed at the top of the monument. It reads: "In Memory of Major George B. Erath, CSA and the more than 600 Confederate veterans of the War Between the States, who rest beneath the rich soil of Erath County. Ordinary men from across the South took up arms to fight an extraordinary war. Together they became one of the most acclaimed fighting forces in military history. The South devastated by war and the hard life during Reconstruction caused families to move to Texas where they hoped for a better life. Erath County prospered as veterans built homes, schools, churches, farms and businesses. CSA veterans became leaders in our towns and communities. They are our ancestors. Their lives, our sacred heritage, we remember with honor and devotion." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth5799/
Red Brick Abandoned Building in Thurber, Texas
Photograph of a red brick building covered in vines and surrounded by trees and shrubs. The building, which is in the background of the image, is facing toward the left and has a flat top roof that is not visible. There is an open tunnel entrance made with red slatted wood on the righthand side of the building. Above this entrance there is a multipanel round top window. There is another smaller round top window beside the entrance close to the ground. Next to this window there is a white round top panel also positioned close to the ground. The side of the building is covered with healthy green vines. There is a large bushy tree covering most of the front of the building. The image is framed with the tops of bushes along the bottom of the foreground. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth5214/
Red-brick smokestack of the Texas Pacific Coal and Oil Company, detail
Red-brick smokestack of the Texas Pacific Coal and Oil Company, detail texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth5218/
Red-brick smokestack of the Texas Pacific Coal and Oil Company, detail
Red-brick smokestack of the Texas Pacific Coal and Oil Company, detail: 1908 texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth5216/
Red-brick smokestack of the Texas Pacific Coal and Oil Company sign
THIS IS THE SITE OF THE FIRST COMMERCIAL COAL PRODUCED IN TEXAS BY TEXAS & PACIFIC COAL COMPANY. MINED IN 1888. THIS COMPANY WAS THE FORERUNNER OF TEXAS PACIFIC COAL AND OIL COMPANY, NOW ONE OF THE NATION'S SUBSTANTIAL INDEPENDENT PRODUCERS OF OIL AND GAS. THE TRANSITION FROM COAL MINING TO PETROLEUM PRODUCTION WAS ACCELERATED BY THE COMPANY'S DISCOVERY IN 1917 OF OIL AND GAS IN THE GREAT RANGER FIELD, 16 MILES TO THE WEST. IT WAS A NATURAL EVOLUTION OF AN AMERICAN ENTERPRISE DEDICATED TO DEVELOPING NATURAL RESOURCES TO SUPPLY THE NATION'S GROWING NEEDS FOR ABUNDANT ENERGY. BENEATH THIS GROUND LIES PART OF THE 127,000,000 TONS OF COAL STILL OWNED BY TEXAS PACIFIC, WHICH MAY BE MINED IN THE FUTURE. THIS IS TEXAS' ONLY KNOWN DEPOSIT OF BITUMINOUS COAL OCCURS FROM THE SURFACE TO A DEPTH OF 450 FEET. ERECTED MARCH, 1960 BY TEXAS PACIFIC COAL AND OIL COMPANY, FORT WORTH, TEXAS texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth5219/
Red-brick smokestack of the Texas Pacific Coal and Oil Company, Thurber
Red-brick smokestack of the Texas Pacific Coal and Oil Company. EVOLUTION OF AN OIL COMPANY texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth5217/
Red-brick smokestack of the Texas Pacific Coal and Oil Company, Thurber
Red-brick smokestack of the Texas Pacific Coal and Oil Company. EVOLUTION OF AN OIL COMPANY texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth5221/
Red fire hydrant, Thurber
Photograph of a corroded red fire hydrant in Thurber, Texas, surrounded by grass. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth5213/
Smokestack Restaurant, Thurber
Photograph of the Smokestack Restaurant in Thurbur, Texas. The restaurant is red with green trim and the parking lot in front of the building is filled with cars and several people standing around a group of motorcycles. The edge of a field is visible in the foreground of the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth5215/
Stephenville Museum
Photograph of the Stephenville Museum, located in the Berry House, 525 E. Washington in Stephenville, Texas. The house is made of light-colored stone with a steep wood-shingled roof that has a red chimney on either side. There is a wide balcony on the second story, above the front porch and the trim is painted white. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth5796/
Stephenville Museum Sign
Sign at the Stephenville Museum texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth5795/
Stephenville Museum, Stephenville Study Club, Twentieth Century Club Sign
Sign at Stephenville Museum, Stephenville Study Club, Twentieth Century Club texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth5793/
The Texarkana Gateway to Texas and the Southwest
This text gives an overview of the places and resources in Texas with an emphasis on the locations where the railroads run through the state. Indexes start on page 220. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth61116/
Thurber Antiques & Treasures
Photograph of a two-story building in Thurber, Texas that used to be a gas station, viewed from the back. Part of the second story forms an overhang where gas pumps are visible; it also has a taller platform with a railing that has a "Thurber" sign on the side and a "Thurber Tipple" sign near the roof. A newer sign on the side of the building says "Thurber 'Tiques & Treasures" as well as "Western Art * Antiques * Crafts * Collectibles & Gifts." Other signs on the building say "Oil Change," "Fish Bait," "Hay for Sale," and "New-Used Tires." A restaurant building is visible in the background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth5224/
Thurber Fire Station
Photograph of the fire station in Thurber, Texas. The building is painted red with white trim and part of the brick smokestack is visible on the right. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth5223/
Truss Bridge in Erath County
Old railroad truss bridge over a creek in Erath County, TX texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth14406/
Truss Bridge in Erath County
Old railroad truss bridge over a creek in Erath County, TX texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth14404/
Truss Bridge in Erath County
Old railroad truss bridge over a creek in Erath County, TX texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth14405/
W. K. Gordon Center for Industrial History of Texas
W. K. Gordon Center for Industrial History of Texas, Tarleton State University. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth5222/