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Historic plaque - Dr. Preston C. Coleman

Historic plaque - Dr. Preston C. Coleman

Date: August 7, 2005
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Description: Photograph of a historic marker. It reads: "Physician and Leader Dr. Preston C. Coleman (1853 - 1932). Born in Tennessee. Graduated from University of Louisville (KY.). Coming in 1883 to Colorado City, rode horseback or by buggy to ranches in 100-mile radius, practicing here rest of his life. Religion, medicine, and education were his chief concerns. He was a Texas & Pacific Railroad surgeon; 1895-96 president, Texas Medical Association; a fellow, American College of Surgeons; an elder in his church; moderator, 1930, Texas Presbyterian Synod; trustee, 1906-31, Austin College (Sherman); Vice President for life, West Texas Chamber of Commerce; was called "Father of Texas Tech" University. (1972)"
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Historic Plaque, Dubina

Historic Plaque, Dubina

Date: October 7, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Description: "Dubina, which derives its name from the Czech word for Oak Grove, was founded in 1856 by a group of Moravian immigrants, including the Marak Kahlich, Sramek, Peter, Holub, Muzny, and Haidusek families. By 1900 the farming community had erected a church building, mill, cotton gin, blacksmith shop, store, and post office. A 1909 storm and a 1912 fire caused extensive damage from which the town never recovered. As the first settlement in Texas to be founded entirely by Czech-Moravians, Dubina remains an important part of the state's regional and cultural history."
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Historic Plaque, Eaton Memorial Chapel

Historic Plaque, Eaton Memorial Chapel

Date: October 29, 2005
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Description: Photograph of a historic marker in Galveston, Texas. It reads: "Eaton Memorial Chapel. Designed by noted architect Nicholas Clayton. Gothic Revival Style. Dedicated as memorial in 1882 to the Rev. Benjamin Eaton, founding Rector, 1841-71. Half of the funds provided by the Ladies' Parochial Society; half by financier Henry Rosenberg. After city-wide fire (1885), chapel was used by St. Paul's German Presbyterian Church. Center of parish life 1900-01 and 1925-27 during church repair. Renovated in 1946 and 1966. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1970."
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Historic Plaque, Elise Waerekskjold

Historic Plaque, Elise Waerekskjold

Date: March 1, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Description: Photograph of a historic plaque in Hamilton, Texas. It reads: "Elise Waerekskjold, (Home 3 blocks W; Grave 6 Blocks NW). Influential early promoter of Norwegian Emigration to Texas: Born Elise Tvede in 1815. In 1846, after John Reiersen migrated to Texas to found the first Norwegian settlement in the state, she became editor of his periodical "Norway and Texas". Through her articles, many were inspired to move here. In 1847 she, too, moved to Texas, and resided in both Van Zandt County and Hamilton County. She married Wilhelm Waerenskjold. Often they welcomed grateful newcomers into their home. Here she helped preserve the history of her people. Died 1895. (1968)"
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Historic plaque - Fannin County Courthouses

Historic plaque - Fannin County Courthouses

Date: October 10, 2005
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Description: Photograph of a historic marker. It reads: "Fannin County Courthouses. Commissioners' Court first met at Jacob Black's cabin on Feb. 26, 1836, before Fannin County was officially organized. In 1838 Warren (near present Ambrose in Grayson County) was named the county seat. The courthouse built there in 1840 was a two-story oak and cedar structure with rough plank floors. In 1843 the county seat was moved to Bois D'Arc, town's name was changed to Bonham, for an Alamo hero, the next year. Judge John P. Simpson donated land for the small log courthouse of 1843. Later another cabin was built with a breezeway connecting the two. In this early courthouse jurors sat above the courtroom in a loft that could be reached only by an outside ladder. This log building served until 1881 when a two-story brick structure was erected at the same location. This was replaced in 1888 by a three-story courthouse made of native stone from Gober, south of Bonham, and built by Scottish-born stonemasons Kane and Cormack. Fire in 1929 destroyed the clock steeple, and the building was remodeled. Using part of the 1888 structure, this courthouse was constructed in 1965-6 with a facade of Leuders stone. ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Historic plaque, Fayette County Courthouse

Historic plaque, Fayette County Courthouse

Date: October 7, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Description: Photograph of a historic plaque. It reads: "Fayette County Courthouse. About 1890, the structural safety of Fayette County's third courthouse came into question, and plans began for the building of this structure to serve as the seat of justice for the county. The commissioners court hired San Antonio architect James Riely Gordon (1863-1937) to design the new courthouse and oversee the construction. Gordon, who was 27 years old at the time, went on to become a noted architect of public buildings in Texas. Funding for the 1890-91 courthouse came from the sale of $90,000 in bonds. Martin, Byrnes and Johnston of Colorado City served as building contractors. Gordon designed the courthouse in the Romanesque Revival style and specified four types of native Texas stone to detail the exterior: Blue Muldoon sandstone, Belton White limestone, Pecos Red sandstone and Pink Burnet granite. A central open atrium, designed to promote good lighting and natural ventilation, highlighted the interior space. The extensive use of stone, along with the massive arched windows and doorways, exemplify the building's Romanesque Revival influences. The oldest existing J. Riely Gordon courthouse in Texas, the Fayette County courthouse was completed in 1891. It has served as a setting for ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Historic plaque, First Girl's Tomato Club in Texas

Historic plaque, First Girl's Tomato Club in Texas

Date: October 8, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Description: Photograph of a historic plaque in Cameron, Texas. It reads: "First Girl's Tomato Club in Texas. The first Girl's Tomato Clubs in Texas were organized in 1912 in Milam County to acquaint young women in rural areas with tomato production and canning techniques. At the request of the United States Department of Agriculture, Mrs. Edna Westbrook Trigg, a local high school principal, agreed to undertake the project. She organized eleven clubs throughout the county, with members ranging in age from ten to eighteen. A similar program for boys, the Corn Clubs, had been instituted in Jack County four years earlier. Each member of the Girl's Tomato Clubs was to produce a tomato crop on one-tenth of an acre of land and then was taught proper canning procedures. The girls exhibited their products at Milano, Rockdale, the 1913 State Fair in Dallas, and the Waco Cotton Palace. So successful were these exhibits that several of the girls started college education funds with the money they raised selling their goods. As the state's first rural girl's organization of its kind, the Tomato Clubs were forerunners of later programs, including 4-H, that were initiated under the supervision of the Texas Agricultural Extension Service. ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Historic plaque - Founding of Colorado City

Historic plaque - Founding of Colorado City

Date: August 7, 2005
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Description: Photograph of a historic marker in Colorado City. It reads: "The Founding of Colorado City. Founded, 1880, at the crossing of the Colorado River and Texas & Pacific Railroad right-of-way: central shipping point and supply depot for the sprawling cattle ranches of west Texas and New Mexico. From 1880 (when A. W. Dunn opened his dirt-floor. Tent-roof General Store) to 1890. The boisterous cattle town garnered notoriety as well as fame. The largest community between Fort Worth and El Paso. Colorado City had more millionaires than any other Texas town and the most saloons in the west. Law and order was housed in a dugout at the edge of town. Where a company of Texas Rangers made all men check their guns. Modest, courageous Ranger Dick Ware was elected first sheriff in 1881. Population soared from 700 to 5,000 in the first two years. As cowboys, cattlemen, merchants, and (as a visitor said) "any number of bummers", vied for space. The first sermon was preached in a saloon and the town "jail" was a chain attached to a mesquite tree, but citizens could find beauty in the lantern-glow from dozens of tents in the center of town. Althought drought and ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Historic Plaque, Gunfight at the Lampasas Saloon

Historic Plaque, Gunfight at the Lampasas Saloon

Date: March 1, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Description: Photograph of a historic marker in Lampasas. It reads: "In the early 1870s Lampasas was a wild frontier town. In January 1873 Sheriff S.T. Denson was shot while arresting brothers Wash and Mark Short. The district judge sent men to apprehend the Short brothers, but the posse was stopped by Ben, Tom, and Mart Horrell and several others. Sheriff Denson and the justices of the peace of Lampasas County appealed to Governor Edmund J. Davis for the assistance of the State Police. On February 10, Governor Davis issued a proclamation prohibiting the carrying of sidearms in Lampasas. On March 14, Captain Thomas Williams and seven state policemen entered Lampasas to enforce the proclamation. The State Police immediately arrested Bill Bowen for carrying a gun in town. Bowen persuaded Captain Williams and two of his men to enter Jerry Scott's Lampasas Saloon, this led to a gunfight between the State Police and the Horrell brothers and their associates. Three officers were killed in the saloon and a fourth was fatally wounded while trying to escape. The police were buried in Lampasas, but Captain Williams was reinterred in the Texas State Cemetery in Austin. More State Police came to Lampasas and joined ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Historic Plaque, Hamilton County Courthouse

Historic Plaque, Hamilton County Courthouse

Date: March 1, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Description: Photograph of a historic marker. It reads: "Hamilton County Courthouse. Before era of this impressive courthouse, Hamilton County's government was housed in stores, a rustic school, a former livery stable, a 2-story building with top floor especially designed for a courtroom, and briefly in a saloon. Fire razed two of the early improvised courthouses. First permanent one built in 1878, also burned in 1886. In those days outlaws were so numerous that guards were hired to protect visiting judges. This 1887 structure of native limestone, quarried 2 miles east of Hamilton, remained unchanged until it was remodeled in 1931. (1970)"
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries