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  Partner: UNT Archives
 Resource Type: Letter
 Decade: 1870-1879
[Letter Acknowledging Payment of Costs, July 24, 1875]
Letter from Thomas Selman of the county of Montague acknowledging the payment of costs in the court of Montague county. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth187205/
[Letter from Alice Donnell to Mollie Moore, December 18, 1875]
Alice is happy to hear from her friend and wishes to visit. She inquires about Joe's trunk and if Mr. Moore knows anything about it. She would like Mollie to write back as soon as possible with information on Joe's trunk. She mentions Bettie's mother who is not feeling well.Dinkie wants to throw a party for Joe and Alice wishes Mollie and Mr. Moore could go. Mary Jane and Simeon have not married yet and Simeon talks of going to Texas. Alice now has the Texas fever and really wants to go. John Wallace and Susie Lore are talked about by the neighborhood of getting married. She asks Mollie to write her a long letter and to write back about Joe's trunk. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203408/
[Letter from Bettie Franklin and Matilda Dodd to Mary Moore, May 22, 1876]
A letter to Mary Moore from her sister, Bettie Franklin, and her mother, Matilda Dodd. In the letter, Franklin and Dodd discuss the state of the family and of the farm and animals. Franklin informs Moore that there have been many deaths in town, including Mallie Donnell, Mrs. Holder, and Tom Berry's wife. Franklin and Dodd both ask Moore to visit soon. Franklin closes by sending her regards to Moore's husband, Charles B. Moore. Included with this item is the envelope in which the letter was mailed. The letter, postmarked May 22 from Gallatin, Tennessee, is addressed to Mrs. Mollie Moore in McKinney, Collin County, Texas, Box No 12. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203415/
[Letter from Bettie Franklin and Matilda Dodd to Sis and Mr. Moore, March 17, 1879]
Matilda had received and written back already, but hasn't heard anything from them yet. She says that they are doing well, but the county is sick with pneumonia. They have been gardening in the dry weather, but it might frost. She doesn't expect any peaches because of the bad weather. She should finish her quilt by tomorrow. Mrs. Nay died and Peat Wallace lost is youngest son. She is afraid to leave her house at night because of wild hogs. She hopes they are well and asks that they write back soon. Bettie says she has been enjoying good weather and has planted irish potatoes, beets, and parsnips. She asks if Mr. Moore paid the doctor and she wanted to help. Pete Wallace's son was buried last Friday. She went to town and got some dishes and looked at a stove. Abe is going to town to sell wood, she asks that they write back soon. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203472/
[Letter from Bettie Franklin and William Dodd, December 10, 1876]
A letter from Bettie Franklin and William Dodd to their mother (who is visiting Mary Moore) and sister (Mary Ann Dodd Moore). The envelope has a postal stamp reading "Galatin, Tenn; Dec 11" and a hand written note reading William Dodd; + Betty Franklin; Recvd Dec 15th; 1876." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203424/
[Letter from Bettie Franklin and William Dodd to their Sister and Mr. Moore, October 25, 1878]
They are doing well, she had a slight chill and Abe is getting over his cold with medicine given to him from Dr. Woodson. Her and her mother went to see Mr. Donnell and he doesn't look like he has long to live. MRs. Summers looks well. She and Mrs. Montgomery would like to see her. Mollie Love, Mary, and the children visited. They went to edgefield and didn't have to stay the night because the train was behind schedule. They were at her parent's place but her parent's did not realize they were there until they went out to meet them. The children have gotten bigger and are now in school everyday. They are waiting for their boxes to arrive, her father says there is too much fright on the road. Abe is going to town to get more information. She wants to purchase land to start a home but Abe hasn't said anything. She also wants to be together. Her father and mother wrote postal cards and she asks that they write back soon. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203456/
[Letter from Bettie Franklin, November 7, 1875]
Bettie was unable to write a quick letter before Robbe left and she wanted to send some patterns and a dress that needs work done on it. She mentions it was unbearably hot inside the house. Someone is very sick and wants to see Charles and his wife soon. She sends all of her love to the relatives and hopes that Charles is done with his wheat so they can come visit. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203407/
[Letter from Bettie Franklin to her Sister and Mr. Moore, June 5, 1877]
She arrived home Friday night and had to sleep for two days to recover, Sissy got sick and took medicine to recover. They canned 6 cans of cherries. It has been dry, it rained early in the season but then dried up. Bettie's garden looks good despite the dry weather. Her beans are blooming and had an abundance of irish potatoes. Several people are about to head out to Texas. Dinky will write to her by the end of the week and She wants her to save some Texas flower seeds for her. Bettie isn't feeling well and was happy to see her sister and mother. She will write more next time and Lilly has been taking strawberries and cherries. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203438/
[Letter from Bettie Franklin to Mary Ann Dodd Moore and Matilda Brantley Dodd, February 21, 1877]
A personal letter from Bettie Franklin to her sister, Mary Ann Dodd Moore, and her mother, Matilda Brantley Dodd. The letter talks about daily life, including a quilting party that Bettie had and news about her young son. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203430/
[Letter from Bettie Franklin to Matilda Dodd and Mary Moore, January 28, 1877]
A letter from Bettie Franklin to Matilda Dodd and Mary Moore on January 28, 1876. Mary's mother, Matilda, is visiting her in Texas. In the letter, Bettie talks about the warm and clear weather, as well as the state of the farm and animals. She mentions that there have been several weddings, including that of Laura Wallace and Frank Dorris. In closing, Bettie says that many neighbors' dogs have gone mad - she fears that hers will also go mad. Included with this item is the envelope in which the letter was mailed. The envelope, postmarked January 29 from Gallatin, Tennessee, is addressed to Mrs. Mollie Moore in McKinney, Collin County, Texas, Box No 12. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203427/
[Letter from Bob Landers to Charles B. Moore, May, 23, 1875]
This letter from the Charles B. Moore collection is written by Bob Landers and is addressed to C.B. Moore. In his letter, Landers details for Moore news about his family and their health, news about his crops and the cold spring weather, and news from his community. In the closing remarks, Landers sends his respect to Moore's family. It is dated May 23, 1875. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203399/
[Letter from Bratney, W. A., July 26, 1876]
A personal letter from W. A. Bratney to Mollie Moore informing her that he had gotten married and started a new line of work in collections. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203420/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Will Boyd, November 3, 1873]
Letter from Charles B. Moore in Collin County to Will Boyd, Phelps, Missouri discussing the poor crops that year, including corn and wheat and the slightly better cotton. He discusses the large volume of emigrants entering the area looking for cheap land who are willing to work. He mentions a visit from Uncle Bill Moore from Atlanta, Aunt Polly Winham from Jerseyville, Illinois, and other family members. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203379/
[Letter from Charles Moore to Elvira Moore and Jo, November 22, 1871]
Letter from Charles Moore to Elvira Moore and Jo (perhaps Wallace). The letter mentions births, deaths, health of friends, family, and neighbors, as well as farming concerns. Murders and attempted murders are also discussed. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth207681/
[Letter from Charles Moore to Elvira Moore, October 21, 1871]
Letter to Elvira Moore from Charles Moore discussing his trip to Sherman, Texas, with Henry Moore to have wheat processed into flour, an account of the health of family and friends, and the transport of a man named Parker to Sherman, Texas in order to stand trial for the murder of a person named Peacock. Portions of the document have been destroyed and are illegible. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth207678/
[Letter from Charles Moore to Henry and Elvira Moore, October 29, 1870]
Transcript of a letter from Charles Moore to Henry and Elvira Moore, discussing gastrointestinal illness, machinery, and a mill. Damage has removed several portions of the letter along a vertical line. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth207664/
[Letter from Comptroller of Public Accounts Stephen H. Darden to Levi Perryman, August 14, 1875]
Letter from Stephen H. Darden to Levi Perryman asking him to send in vouchers so he can be reimbursed for conveyance of convicts. Note added to bottom says not to lose the letter. The signature is illegible. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth186872/
[Letter from Comptroller of Public Accounts Stephen H. Darden to Montague County Presiding Justice, April 9, 1875]
Letter from Stephen Heard Darden, Comptroller of Public Accounts of the State of Texas to Presiding Justice of Montague County about debts drawn on Levi Perryman, Sheriff, for assessing taxes. The justices will have to decide amongst themselves how the funds will be divided. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth186870/
[Letter from Dinkie McGee to her Sister and Mother, April 15, 1877]
She ran into Mollie McGee and heard that Abe was up there, and Bettie was there Tuesday. She now has 60 little chickens and When she comes to visit she will make fried chicken. They will also have a lot of peaches, her onions are doing well too. Henry planted his sweet potatoes recently and George Wallace married recently, to Morilla Vaughn. The children talk of going to visit their Aunt Mollie and Uncle Charlie and Grandma. Bettie gave Willie some duck eggs and he had them taken care of by Nat. Dinkie asks that she write soon. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203431/
[Letter from Dinkie McGee to her Sister and Mr. Moore, November 2, 1879]
She is sorry for not writing sooner, but everyone is doing well. They are having cool weather with two frosts within the last two weeks. Henry hasn't sowed his wheat yet because he was waiting for his corn. They made 15 bushels of irish potatoes and 12 bushes of sweet potatoes. They are going to have turnips as big as plates and will eat it with beef club. Willie and Sissie's teacher Mr. Holder is giving out a prize for the student who has the most head marks. There has been great growth in the campbellites. Simon McGee joined, as did Bettie Elllis and Anne Jones. Mrs. McGee went to stay with Mr. Albeight in Kentucky. They raised a lot of chickens this year. Miss Sucky is weaving her a carpet, it is mixed colored and she won't be able to put it down this winter. She asks about Billy getting married. She also mentions there might be two parties, but she won't dance because of her foot. She ask that they write back soon. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203461/
[Letter from Dinkie McGee to her Sister, July 25, 1875]
The author tells her sister that everyone is doing well except Willie and Sassie who have colds. Mr. McGee died, he had a stroke and had cholera. She had tomatoes for a week. The author still owes $10 on her machine, but her mother gave her $5. The author wants her sister to come and visit so she can make wine for her and her husband. Her sister is planning to sell her goat, and she is going to town to buy a new dress. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203402/
[Letter from Dinkie McGee to her Sister, June 9, 1877]
They arrived in Sherman and then stayed at a couple of friends' places. They left Sherman and arrived at Gallatin Friday night. Sissie got sick and so did Willie. Mr. McMurry joined them on their way home and got robbed. It has been raining and they needed it. They have been eating peas, irish potatoes, and beets from her garden. She canned cherries and was able to finish ironing. No one has come to visit yet, but Mollie McGee should come by. She is not going to Aunt Peggy's funeral because her mother is coming home with them. Her father sent Bill Jones to go work at her sister's farm and she is going to send some quilt pieces to her. So that Aunt Til will piece them together and her sister could bring them back. Willie would like her to bring some pecans with her. Sissie likes talking about Uncle Charlie's cows and telling all of their names. She asks to give her love to Mrs. Burge and Aunt Til and Maria. She asks to forgive the bad writing. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203440/
[Letter from Dinkie McGee to Mary Ann Dodd Moore and Matilda Brantley Dodd, February 18, 1877]
A personal letter from Dinkie McGee to her sister, Mary Ann Dodd Moore, and mother, Matilda Brantley Dodd, in Texas. The letter discusses daily life and events. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203429/
[Letter from Dinkie McGee to Mary Ann Dodd Moore and Matilda Brantley Dodd, January 28, 1877]
A personal letter from Dinkie McGee to her mother, Matilda Brantley Dodd, and her sister, Mary Ann Dodd Moore. She discusses daily life happenings in the area and on her farm. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203428/
[Letter from Dinkie McGee to Mary Ann Dodd Moore, July 16, 1876]
Letter from Dinkie McGee to her sister, Mary Ann Dodd Moore discussing all the illness from flux, including her daughter, Sissie, who almost died. Discusses numerous other neighbors that had died from the flux. Discusses 4th of July parade and picnic put on by the Grangers (The National Grange of the Order of Patrons of Husbandry). Discusses the garden and the wheat threshing and the hopes that Mary will be able to visit. She says to "tell Mr. Moore I prefer living here [Tennessee] if the women have children when 50 years old out there [in Texas]." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203417/
[Letter from Dinkie McGee to Mary Ann Dodd Moore, May 27, 1876]
Letter from Dinkie McGee to her sister, Mary Ann Dodd Moore discussing neighbors and friends, gardening, quilt making, dress making, purchase of new mules, sale of a calf and the possibility of moving to Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203416/
[Letter from Dinkie McGee to Mary Ann Dodd Moore, November 19, 1876]
A personal letter from Dinkie McGee to her sister Mary Ann Dodd Moore. A note on the envelope reads "Dinky McGee; Recd 24th Nov; 1876." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203422/
[Letter from Dinkie McGee to Mary Ann Dodd Moore, October 27, 1876]
Personal letter from Dinkie McGee to her sister Mary Ann Dodd Moore. Postal stamp on envelope reads "Gallatin, Tenn; 28." Hand written note on envelope reads "Dinkie; McGee; Received Oct 30; 1876." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203421/
[Letter from Dinkie McGee to Mr. Moore and Sis, February 28, 1879]
Dinkie says they are all well, but Sissie who has a cold. Bettie is also not doing well and has asked about the Moore's. Bettie got some mulberry bushes and it has been so cold that Abe couldn't work. Her father got Bettie bedsteads and she comments that Abe's house will look nice when it is done. She plans to give Bettie hens and Henry made her two brooms. Mr. Tommie Dobbins and Mr. Smith Neal have died. A lot of people have been dealing with pneumonia. Willie now has a drake and two top knotted ducks. Willie tapped the sugar tree and made a pint of molasses. She asks about Jeff and if they have gardened anything yet. She did laundry and felt beat. She asks if they plan on visiting this year, she received a letter from Bettie Wilson and they will be visiting. She asks that they write soon. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203473/
[Letter from Dinkie McGee to Sis, January 17, 1879]
Dinky did not receive the letter from her of the 18th, so she is writing again. Abe and Willie visited and then it started raining so they stayed. Then it got really cold, they had snow and ice for five weeks. Dinky and Wilie have had multiple time of slipping on the ice. She has been to three parties, Simon McGee, John Wallace and a Christmas party at Ben Withers. Henry went to Nashville and John Wallace went with her. Mrs. McGee watched the children. She was supposed to go to a party at Tobe Franklins', but it has been raining. They ate meat, turnips and sweet and irish potatoes, corn, and blackberry pie for dinner. Sidney Lewis moved to town and the freeze froze all of her mothers flowers. They are unable to kill the two hogs because it is so cold. Willie has many supplies for writing given to him by his Uncle Abe and Old Cris. Willie and Sissie wanted to see their Uncle Charlie when he made Caddo's prints in the snow. Dinkie was unable to make cakes because of the cold. Willie writes his name and says not to laugh at it. Sissie wants to see Caddo. She asks that they write soon. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203477/
[Letter from Dinkie McGee to Sissie and Bettie, June 28, 1878]
She was going to write back sooner but did not have any paper. She is doing well and hasn't visited her mother in a week. She feels bad that Sissie has a sore hand and that Bettie has the chills again. They have had warm weather and it is raining. She has a lot of beans and cucumbers that they have been eating for the last 5 weeks. She also has a lot of apples. She is waiting for tomatoes and rosemary to ripen. They have had blackberry pie that Willie and Sissie picked. Bob Wilson is in Fort Worth. She went to visit her mother and Bettie Moore, Mrs. Donnell and Aunt Nancy were there. Henry has not shed his wheat because he has been plowing and hauling hay. Sissie wants Uncle Charlie to send another name for the calves. She wants to make them jam. Tobe cut his fingers on the blade when grinding. Willie and Sissie are going to Sunday school where they memorize verses. She got a new dress and shirt. She sends love and asks them to write back soon. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203453/
[Letter from Dinkie McGee to Sissie and Bettie, May 30, 1878]
She says that she has been visiting people and that they are all doing well. Tobe brought over a mower and was cutting clovers. She saw the Moore's and they were quite stylish. She hasn't seen Bettie Franklin or Jack Wallace. She is going to start Willie and Sissie in Sunday school. Henry has been helping Mr. Cambell with his wheat and next week help cut theirs. Their chickens are too small to eat and they have some peas, but really good irish potatoes. They should also have good corn with the weather holding up. She wants to send them apples. Mr. Summers is also looking like he won't live long. There is going to be a ball in town and Tobe asked her to go with him, but she didn't have a dress. She asks about Abe and how he is doing with the chills and how they are enjoying Texas. She mentions that the raspberries and blackberries will make good jam and she wishes they were here to make some. She asks about Bill and if he is married. She wants them to save her some wildflower seeds. She sends love and some small request from others. She ends with telling them to write soon. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203452/
[Letter from Dinkie to Her Sister, September 24, 1875]
The author mentions that everyone is doing well. The author is going to take her children to town to see a show and she has a meeting the next Sunday. Bettie and her mother went to town and got two dresses. Old Pros is working with Old Kit's colt for seventeen days. Mollie Loves' baby had a cold and Alice Donnell wants to see the author's sister. The author is going to make a dress and suit for a wedding between Dock D. and Miss Fallen. Bettie is pregnant with Abe's child. Willie has a brief letter to his aunt about jackets and going to the show next week. Mr. Wilson has land in Ellis County. There is also a letter to Mr. Moore from W. H. McGee. Henry's eyes are bad so McGee is writing for him. There has been a bid on his land and he is considering moving to Texas if he could get some cheap land in Mr. Moore's neighborhood. Henry hopes to write himself next time. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203405/
[Letter from Elvira Moore and Jo S. Wallace to Charles Moore, January 31, 1872]
Letter from Elvira Moore and Jo S. Wallace to Charles Moore. They share local gossip, comment on the harsh weather in Tennessee, makes note of recent local weddings, and Wallace talks about a wheat processing device referred to as "the dropper." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth207683/
[Letter from Elvira Moore to Aunt Till and Papa, November 13, 1870]
Letter from Elvira Moore to her father and Aunt Till regarding friends and family, farming, local news, and day to day activities. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth207680/
[Letter from Elvira Moore to Charles Moore, October 17, 1870]
Letter from Elvira Moore to Charles Moore, discussing family health topics, farming, and her relatives hunting deer. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth207663/
[Letter from Elvira Moore to Charles Moore, Sabina, and Mr. Morris' family, October 24, 1871]
Letter from Elvira Moore to Charles Moore, wherein Elvira tells her uncle about a visit she had with extended family. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth207679/
[Letter from Elvira Moore to her family, December 20, 1871]
Letter from Elvira Moore to her family, giving her account of visiting her relatives in Tennessee. Personal illness and the death of a child are recalled. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth207682/
[Letter from Elvira Moore to Jo Wallace, August 20, 1879]
They are on a trip and Jo is in the wagon in a makeshift bed. Along the trip Jo improved. They stopped at a red house and fed the team and ate dinner. They ate squirrel and chicken with crackers. They arrived at aunt Nancy's by sundown. Uncle Even had just left and got a free ride to Nashville, he is going to pick up his railroad dividends. Jo wrote to John to come, they will be going with her to Texas. When they arrived Charles and Bettie had already arrived from Sherman. Jo is still not doing well, but they are waiting on him and will be able to provide for him. Minlele E. has had several offers to buy his land, but he didn't want to do anything without hearing from Wallace. She will get her last letters today, but maybe more from the office. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203466/
[Letter from Enoch D. Rushing and Henry Moore to Charles Moore, September 15, 1870]
Letter from Enoch Rushing and Henry Moore to Charles Moore. Enoch Rushing talks about local politics, farming, and friends. Henry Moore talks about family health, mill work, and property for sale. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth207660/
[Letter from Enoch D. Rushing to Charles B. Moore, July 15, 1875]
This letter from the Charles B. Moore Collection is written by Enoch D. Rushing and is addressed to C. B. Moore. Rushing details updates in his are and they are: news about the crop failures in his area, news about local deaths of notable community members, news about local marriages, information about the local mill, information on local politics,and news about his daughter's marriage. In Rushing's closing remarks, he inquires about updates on Ziza, Alvira, Sabina, and Henry. He notes that Moore should direct his letters to Aldenbrook Post Office in Independence county, Arkansas because the old Pleasant Plains Post Office is "kept foul by them dirty McCauleys." It is dated July 17, 1875. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203400/
[Letter from F. H. Kollock to H. K. Redway, January 6, 1876]
Letter from F. H. Kollock to H. K. Redway which states that Kollock has enclosed the warranty deed from J. Q. Brigham. Kollock details that he has also included the certificate of register of deeds from the county, showing that the mortgage has been "satisfied of record." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth186703/
[Letter from F. H. Kollock to H. K. Redway, October 5, 1875]
Letter from F. H. Kollock to H. K. Redway detailing a real estate agreement made between J. Q. Brigham and H. K. Redway. Kollock is requesting signatures on the promissory notes for the mortgage. Kollock also states that Brigham has signed the deed and has given the document to him, awaiting the signed notes and a draft from Redway. He relays to Redway that once he receives the "properly signed" notes and a $600.00 draft, he will send the deed to him. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth186705/
[Letter from Fletcher S. Stockdale to Charles B. Moore, January 1, 1876]
A letter from Fletcher S. Stockdale to Charles B. Moore on January 1, 1876. In the letter, Stockdale discusses aspects of the Texas Constitutional Convention of 1875 related to separation of church and state. Stockdale notes that all the liberal men of the convention voted for a clause requiring officeholders to acknowledge the existence of a Supreme Being, though he himself strongly opposed the clause. Stockdale tells Moore that he is glad to hear from him and is grateful for memories of old friends. In closing, Stockdale sends his greetings to Moore's family, and says he would like to hear from Moore again. Included with this item is the envelope in which the letter was mailed. The envelope is addressed to Mr. C. B. Moore in McKinney, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203410/
[Letter from from Charles Moore to Henry Moore, March 8, 1870]
Letter from Charles Moore to Henry Moore discussing farm topics, deaths, shootings, and family illnesses. Includes a transcribed advertisement for boilers. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth207655/
[Letter from George B. Buckler to Charles B. Moore, November 7, 1873]
Letter from George Buckler? saying that he had fallen off a wagon and was unable to come into town. He was no longer able to work as a teacher because the government was too unreliable to pay him a salary. He was owed for three months work already and the pay would only be $50.00 in greenbacks which was not enough remuneration. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203380/
[Letter from George Bratney to Mary Ann Dodd Moore, November 19, 1876]
A personal letter from George Bratney to his cousin Mary Ann Dodd Moore, informing her of his wishes to marry. The envelop has a postal stamp "York, Neb; Nov 23" and a hand written note reading "George Bratney; Recd Nov 28; 1876." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203423/
[Letter from George Bratney to Mary, December 17, 1875]
George hasn't written back because he became sick with Typhoid fever in August and now has the strength to write back. He would like to spend the holidays with Mary in her new home. He still lives in York and because of that was able to go to his brother's wedding. He is going to work on his farm for a time and then decide if the married life is for him. He wants to write her every few days but can't afford it. He is thinking of moving to Texas for the better climate and company. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203409/
[Letter from George Wilson]
A letter from George Wilson of Livingston, TN to Charles B. Moore. The sender is a cousin by marriage to Charles Moore. The letter itself remits news of Mr. Moore's family. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203387/
[Letter from H. S, Moore, August 4, 1877]
A letter from H. S. Moore to C. B. Moore about happenings on their properties during C. B. Moore's absence. Envelope has a note that reads: "H. S. Moore; Received Aug 4th; 1877" and a postal stamp which reads "McKinney Tex; Aug 4." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203443/
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