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  Partner: UNT Archives
 Resource Type: Letter
[Letter from David Acker, December 20]
If Redway retains boxes he will have the receipt for them. Redway's company got three times more carbines than any other company. The store is short 200 saddle blankets and will notify Redway when they receive them. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth186612/
[Letter from H. Clem Mueller, M.D. of Alert Citizens of Texas, Inc. to "Concerned Texan"]
Letter from H. Clem Mueller, M.D. of Alert Citizens of Texas, Inc. to supporters of the corporation "who are concerned about the various threats posed by homosexual conduct to the normal citizens of this State" (p. 3). "BEWARE" is written in red ink on the first page of the letter. In the letter, Mueller cites various studies and statistics about the "Gay Plague" (i.e., AIDS) and includes other warnings about how "homosexuality is extremely dangerous from a public health standpoint" (p. 2). The letter encourages readers to express their concerns about the "Gay Plague" to the Texas Legislature, and asks for financial contributions from the organization's supporters. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc177453/
[Letter from John W. Alexander, june 14, 1865]
Alexander tells Redway to allow Machman to have the set of shoeing tools. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth186604/
[Letter from J. Ann to Charles Moore, April 8, 1883]
He was surprised, but glad to hear from Charles. He is sorry that Charles' brother John was suffering fro rheumatism. He believes everyone is doing well, and he mentions that they are suffering from dry weather. He hopes for good crops this year. There is a liquor prohibiting law and the Marshall takes drunk men to jail every few nights. He tells Charles that his son Will is still sheriff and the ages of aunts and uncles. He doesn't know if Willis is going to leave or not. He asks that they write soon. In the P.S. he asks some questions. He aks if Charles and Henry are the only ones to keep the Moore name. He mentions that the Boyd name rests on the second generation with one boy. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203530/
[Letter from S. T. Appling to Sally Thornhill, May 8, 1899]
This is a letter from the Charles B. Moore Collection. It is written by S. T. Appling to Sally Thornhill. In this letter, Appling discusses the current news in her community. She details the goings-on and well-being of family members. She notes to Sally that she has rheumatism in her hands, making it difficult to write. Appling states that the garden is all planted and details which crops are successful or failing at present. She mentions that Henry is currently shearing sheep, updates Sally on community news and family health, and mentions they do not have much fruit this season. She closes the letter by stating that the family should write to them as soon as they are able. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203812/
[Letter from Dr. Mattie L. Arthur to Linnet Moore White, December 19, 1913]
This is a letter from the Charles B. Moore Collection. In this letter, Dr. Mattie L. Arthur thanks Linnet Moore White for her kindness during her visit with White. She notes that she has intended to write, but has been very busy. She wishes that all are well and also that Linnet and family have a wonderful Christmas and a healthy, Happy New Year. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204086/
[Letter from Mattie L. Arthur to Linnet White, August 24, 1917]
Letter to Linnet White from Mattie L. Arthur. She writes to inform Linnet that she is welcome in Mattie's home and that Mattie hopes to see her soon. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204182/
[Letter from Mattie L. Arthur to Linnet White, March 30, 1917]
Letter to Linnet White from Mattie L. Arthur. She wrote to talk to Linnet about an operation that Linnet was planning to have soon in Omaha. She also includes bits of local news from the area. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204156/
[Letter from A. S. Ashmead to the Paymaster General, August 11, 1864]
Letter to the Paymaster General that transportation was furnished to Baltimore MD for Joseph Freeman at the cost of $2.06. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth186407/
[Letter from Jane Atkisson to Charles Moore, April 23, 1865]
Letter from Jane Atkisson to Charles Moore with some local news and a request that Charles write to Tennessee on her behalf. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203355/
[Transcript of letter from Jane Atkisson to Charles Moore, April 23, 1865]
Transcript of a letter from Jane Atkisson to Charles Moore with some local news and a request that Charles write to Tennessee on her behalf. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203131/
[Letter from O. G. Bacon to Hamilton K. Redway, June 8, 1864]
Letter from O.G. Bacon to Hamilton K. Redway which discusses the the current happenings in Bacon's life and in the county he lives in. He tell Redway of a job offer he has taken and of the bountiful wheat and fruit crops. Bacon furthers that the two should continue to correspond to one another. In the letter's closing, he and his wife send their love to Redway's wife and family. Bacon wrote this letter to Redway while he was living in Rheatown, Tennessee. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth186792/
[Letter from J. C. Barr to C. B. Moore, April 22, 1877]
Barr is talking about an advertising sheet that Moore wrote on that he found interesting. He asks about damages and if someone is going to visit. He mentions that everyone is well. Abner's son is not well with a fever. It has been really wet, and they have been unable to work on their corn. He has cut wood and a garden planted. He were able to sell 700 bushels of corn at 39 cents, 400 bushels of wheat at $1.41. He is hoping for no war in the east because of property damage. He hopes they write back soon. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203432/
[Letter from J. C. Barr to C. B. Moore, March 24, 1882]
He says that they haven't heard from them in a while and were happy to hear that they were doing well. Mary was expecting $100 from her uncle Same Wallace's estate. He is sorry that the estate is going to the courts to be settled. He has had a cold for the past three weeks and hopes he is almost over it. He mentions that all of the relatives are well and there have been five deaths in the city. He mentions that the roads aren't good and they have started plowing oats. J. Knox Smith has consumption. He says the wheat looks well considering the problems they had in the fall. They have had hay, corn, oats, and bran delivered to the county for home demands. He has irish potatoes from Ireland and Scotland on sale. He asks that they write soon and sends his regards. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203508/
[Letter from J. C. and Mary A. Barr to Charles B. Moore, December 3, 1865]
Letter sent to Charles B. Moore from J. C. Barr discussing oil drilling in Jersey County, the health of acquaintances, railroad construction, farming, weather, as well as other family and local news. The third page of the letter is a segment added by Mary A. Barr discussing family life including visiting and gardening. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth221780/
[Letter from John C. Barr to Charles Moore, July 3, 1865]
Letter from John C. Barr in which he copies a letter from Henry Moore to Charles Moore. Henry relays news crops, jayhawkers, and of his impending surrender to the federal forces. In a second part of the letter, Barr mentions that he has received two letters addressed to Charles and then goes into local news. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203359/
[Letter from John C. Barr to Charles Moore, November 1, 1877]
A personal letter from John C. Barr to Charles B. Moore. Postal stamp on envelope reads "Jerseyville, Ill; Nov 2" and a handwritten note on the envelope reads "Received Nov. 5; 1877." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203447/
[Transcript of letter from John C. Barr to Charles Moore, July 3, 1865]
Transcript of a letter from J. C. Barr in which he copies a letter from Henry Moore to Charles Moore. Henry relays news crops, jayhawkers, and of his impending surrender to the federal forces. In a second part of the letter, Barr mentions that he has received two letters addressed to Charles and then goes into local news. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203135/
[Letter from Julia A. Barr to the Moore family, December 3, 1888]
This item is from the Charles B. Moore Collection. It is written by Julia A. Barr, Henry and Charles Moore's cousin. In the letter, Julia updates the Moore family on the happenings in Jerseyville, Illinois and the news includes: a dialogue about meeting cousin George Wilson in Eureka Springs, Arkansas while on a trip there, a discussion about the people that accompanied here on the trip and how long she stayed, details concerning the people she meet in Eureka Springs, a conversation about Seella, her two children, and Polly, a dialogue about their helper who was discharged over a year ago and how they are getting along without him, an update on the bountiful crops and how good rain has made it possible for people to get out of debt, a discussion about "Aunt" Sally Smith and Uncle Abner's family, a dialogue about Sottie Knaff's daughter, details about the Goodrich family, an aside about the town of Jerseyville, a dialogue about Mrs. O. P. Powell's children, a discussion about Wilson Cross and Ida Barr Cross, details about Fannie and her love for entertaining, updates on family, a dialogue about Barr's California trip and the places they stopped at along the way, details about the trip and the cities and sites Barr saw in California, a discussion about the trip back home to Illinois and details about their stop in Salt Lake City, an aside on how lovely the topography was from Salt Lake to Denver, a discussion on her return home, and a dialogue about recent plans. She closes the letter by asking how Linnet was doing, asks the Moore family to write soon, and sends her love to all. The envelope is included with the letter. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203598/
[Letter from Mary A. Barr to Charles B. Moore, November 13, 1887]
Letter from Mary A. Barr talking about improvements made to her property and her livestock. Talks about her daughter Julia and her travels. Tells about a trip she took with the Odd Fellows to Denver Colorado, including stops in Kansas City, Topeka, and Hutchinson Kansas. She rode the train which included an entire car filled with California fruit that they could have. She also talks about family she visited in Atlanta, Georgia. Includes original envelope. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203587/
[Letter from Dorothy and Banky Bay to Ruth White, January 20, 1916]
Letter to Ruth White from Dorothy and Banky Bay. The two write about what they received for Christmas and refer to themselves as cousins of Ruth's family. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204104/
[Letter from James C. Bell, August 17, 1864]
The Paymaster General's Office has no evidence on Andrew B. Kelly. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth186614/
[Letter from Belle to her friends and family, 1898]
A letter from Belle in Tellico Plains, Tennessee, to her friends and family (the "home folks") in 1898. In the letter, Belle describes the events that took place during a great rain storm and subsequent river flooding in Tellico Plains, near the Tellico Lumber mill. While trying to secure her belongings and escape the home of Mr. Heyser, the general manager of Tellico Lumber, Belle fell into the water beneath a rearing horse ("Joe the horse"). She was saved by John Ballon, a black preacher, whom she called her "hero." Belle mentions that she plans to join Ballon's church and send him a poem entitled "John Ballon and the Flood of '98." Many of the belongings of all involved families were destroyed, but everyone made it out of the flooded area alive. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203151/
[Letter from Alta Berry to Linnet Moore White, June 7, 1909]
Letter from Alta Berry to Claude and Linnet White in which she discusses her health and farming. She says that Claude is in trouble with his crops as he has been "drinking a great deal lately." He was arrested after causing a disturbance at a supper in Melissa, Texas. She also updates Linnet on the activities and health of friends and family. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204001/
[Letter from Alta Berry to Linnet White, July 10, 1916]
Letter to Linnet White from Alta Berry regarding Linnet's daughter Ruth and the quality of crop this season. Alta ends the letter asking if Linnet and Mary Moore will be able to visit soon. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204128/
[Letter from Alta Berry to Linnet White, September 16, 1909]
This is a letter from the Charles B. Moore Collection. It is written by Alta Berry and is addressed to Linnet White. In this letter, Berry informs White of the goings-on in McKinney. Berry discusses community news, details Minnie's plans to visit several friends before she goes back to Weatherford, and notes that the weather has been hot and windy, making everything dusty.She mention that John's Cotton crop is good, that he has planted cane, and notes that his corn was not a good crop. She states that she has not had much luck with raising chickens, but has been successful with turkeys. Berry notes the death of Mariah Rucker, and notes that Linnet may already have heard about Rucker's illness and subsequent death. She informs Linnet that Anna was asking about Mary Ann's soap and would like to but it, but wants to know how much Moore is charging for it. She discusses her baby boy and say she wishes Linnet could see him. Berry closes the letter by noting that Linnet must write soon. The envelope is included with the letter. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204022/
[Letters from Alta Berry and J. H. Berry to Claude D. White, April 11, 1909]
A pair of letters from J.H. and Alta Berry to Claude White describing their experiences on the family farm, including the hassle of keeping turkeys, health issues, keeping servants, and an early frost that may have ruined a cotton crop. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth207690/
[Letter from J. W. Berry to Claude D. White, May 28, 1909]
Letter from Mr. Berry to Claude White that gives the details of the illnesses his family has recently suffered. He heard that Linnet might visit Texas during the summer and hopes that she does. Mr. Berry discusses mutual friends and the crops. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204000/
[Letter from J. W. Berry to Claude D. White, October 13, 1909]
Letter from J. W. Berry to Claude White in which Mr. Berry says he ran into John Cox who told him that Claude owes him money for a mare. Mr. Berry is said that he is "sorry that the trade turned out as it did." He offers to pay Cox for Claude and send him the receipt. He also updates him on the rain and availability of water. A deposit slip for the Melissa State Bank is also included. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204030/
[Letter from J. W. Berry to Claude White, August 8, 1909]
Letter from J. W. Berry to Claude White in which he describes the drought and its impact on the crops. He also writes about the work he has put in to the farm and says that he would like to stay there for four or five years. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204015/
[Letter from John Berry to Claude White and Family, January 10, 1917]
Letter to Claude White and family from John Berry. John wrote a brief letter to send his tax receipt and a check to Claude. He sends his regards for the New Year and wants to hear from them soon. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204148/
[Letter from J. W. Berry to Claude D. White, April 25, 1911]
Letter J. W. Berry to Claude D. White. He wanted to write, but has been sick. He heard from Mr. Drury that Mrs. Moore is going to have an operation and hopes she will be fine. He talks about the weather and farming. He is expecting to see Claude this summer. He talks about Pitt. He mentions he only writes when he has something to write for. He hopes they are doing well. She is sorry for not writing but John was sick and she has been busy. She talks about Mrs. Moore and answers the questions she had about the well. She mentions the rain and how it didn't fill the well but was good for the crops. She talks about her bad luck with chickens. She talks about gardening. Mr. Gibson died. Wylie Horn died the day before he was to get married. She mentions the other couples that were to be married. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204066/
[Letter from D. M. Biddle to Albert, June 4, 1858]
Letter to Albert from D. M. Biddle regarding the condition of Biddle's mill and business. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth207596/
[Letter from Mattie Blackman to C. B. Moore, January 5, 1890]
Mattie is apologetic that they can't answer Moore's questions on a weed. He tries to discuss the possibilities of the germination, but mentions that he is not that knowledgeable on the subject. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203621/
[Letter from Capt. H. H. Boggess to Capt. H. K. Redway, February 17, 1865]
Letter from Capt. H. H. Boggess to Capt. H. K. Redway, in Wheeling, West Virginia, informing him of Private B.F. carpenter's furlough to Cincinnati, Ohio. The document details that Carpenter was part of the "F" company, 1st regiment, and was part of the N. Y. Veterans Cavalry. The private's furlough to Cincinnati would last 15 days and the cost of his transportation to Cincinnati was $1.50, an amount which would be docked from his pay upon his return. The letter also states that Private Carpenter would return for duty to Camp Piatt in West Virginia. A note on the lower left side details that the private was charged on payroll for his furlough on February 28, 1865. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth186340/
[Letter from Capt. H. H. Boggess to Major McPhail, February 15, 1865]
Letter from Capt. H. H. Boggess to Major McPhail, in Wheeling, West Virginia, informing him of Corporal Calvin Hull's furlough to Cincinnati, Ohio. The document details that Hull was part of the "F" company, 1st regiment, and was part of the N. Y. Veterans Cavalry. The corporal's furlough to Cincinnati would last 15 days and the cost of his transportation from Portland to Cincinnati was $3.09, an amount which would be docked from his pay upon his return. The letter also states that Corporal Hull would return for duty to Camp Piatt in West Virginia. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth186338/
[Letter from Capt. H. H. Boggess to Major McPhail, February 17, 1865]
Letter from Capt. H. H. Boggess to Major McPhail, in Wheeling, West Virginia, informing him of Private B.F. carpenter's furlough to Cincinnati, Ohio. The document details that Carpenter was part of the "F" company, 1st regiment, and was part of the N. Y. Veterans Cavalry. The private's furlough to Cincinnati would last 15 days and the cost of his transportation to Cincinnati was $1.50, an amount which would be docked from his pay upon his return. The letter also states that Private Carpenter would return for duty to Camp Piatt in West Virginia. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth186339/
[Letter from May Booth to Linnet Moore, March 24, 1898]
Letter from Mrs. E. T. Booth (May Booth) to Linnet Moore regarding her husband's change of employment as a bookkeeper in Nashville to the head bookkeeper for the Pullman Piano Company. Mrs. Booth says that Richmond was founded by the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers). She says that she likes their new home and invites Linnet to visit. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203755/
[Letter from J. W. Bounds to Charles B. Moore, February 22, 1900]
This is a letter from the Charles B. Moore Collection. It is written to Charles B. Moore from J. W. Bounds. In this letter, Bounds informs Moore of the goings-on in Nashville, TN. The news includes: a discussion about Washington's birthday, details about his Christmas vacations and Lila Franklin, a dialogue about the smallpox outbreak in his area, details not to tell his parents about his close encounter with smallpox, a discussion about graduating, and a weather update. He closes the letter by sending his regard to all of the Moore family. The envelope is included with the letter. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203847/
[Letter from Bounds, J. William to Charles B. Moore, October 8, 1899]
Letter from J. William Bounds to Charles B. Moore in which he says that he has visited a mutual friend, Mr. Crawford. Mr. Crawford is very interested in the phosphate mining industry. Mr. Bounds says that Nashville is a very pleasant place to live. He is a student at Vanderbilt University and plans to graduate soon. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203820/
[Letter from Anna Boyd to Charles B. Moore, April 27, 1899]
This is a letter from the Charles B. Moore Collection. It is written by Anna Boyd and is addressed to Charles B. Moore. She informs Moore about the reasons for the family's delay in continuing correspondence with the Moore family since their visit to Colorado. In this letter, Boyd discusses the weather's affect on their crops for this spring. She details the failures they had last season due to grasshoppers and hopes that this season would be better than the last. She notes that they did not have much success with fruit, though the gooseberry harvest looks promising. She mentions to Moore what the family plans to sow this season and tells him that they are all well at present. The envelope is included with the letter. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203809/
[Letter from Anna Boyd and H. S. Moore to C. B. Moore, September 16, 1893]
Anna Boyd writes that Will's twins are in school and the new baby always wants to be outside. The school district is putting a suspension foot bridge for the children to cross on. He hoped they enjoyed themselves and wanted to go with them to visit family. John has only one son to help him farm and Will has two, but they are still too young. H. S. Moore writes that John will finish gathering corn, and he lifted a sheep out of mud. He mentions the clouds and that Anna Boyd's letter is included in the envelope. He also says that Priest has improved a little. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203693/
[Letter from George Bratney to Mary Ann Dodd Moore, November 19, 1876]
A personal letter from George Bratney to his cousin Mary Ann Dodd Moore, informing her of his wishes to marry. The envelop has a postal stamp "York, Neb; Nov 23" and a hand written note reading "George Bratney; Recd Nov 28; 1876." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203423/
[Letter from George Bratney to Mary, December 17, 1875]
George hasn't written back because he became sick with Typhoid fever in August and now has the strength to write back. He would like to spend the holidays with Mary in her new home. He still lives in York and because of that was able to go to his brother's wedding. He is going to work on his farm for a time and then decide if the married life is for him. He wants to write her every few days but can't afford it. He is thinking of moving to Texas for the better climate and company. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203409/
[Letter from Bratney, W. A., July 26, 1876]
A personal letter from W. A. Bratney to Mollie Moore informing her that he had gotten married and started a new line of work in collections. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203420/
[Letter from James S. Brisbin, April 16, 1866]
Order No. 43. The 6th U.S. Colored Cavalry is disbanded. The colored men are free as promised when they enlisted. Then tell how to preserve freedom, by the bayonet and the ballot. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth186520/
[Letter from E. H. Brooke, February 15, 1865]
The Adjutant General's Office is notifying that John E. Rouk is accepted to receive payment starting January 1, 1865. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth186611/
[Letter to the Editor from Ann Brown - 1983]
Letter from Ann Brown to members of the Dallas Gay Alliance concerning issues during 1983 centering around the AIDS epidemic and the Texas Freedom Festival. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc304774/
[Letter from Alta Bryan to Linnet Moore, January 29, 1899]
Letter from Alta Bryan to Linnet Moore in which she discusses going to school. She says that the teacher separated all the girls that were sitting with their friends and had them sit with their sisters. Alta updates Linnet on the health and activities of the friends they have in common. She says who is getting married, who is courting, and who has broken up. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203796/
[Letter from J. M. Bryan to C. B. Moore, April 1, 1896]CBM_2083-006-002
Letter from J. M. Bryan to C. B. Moore that says the registered letter had returned and that no such office is in the state. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203714/
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