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  Partner: UNT Archives
 Resource Type: Letter
[Letter from C. B. Moore to Mary Moore, January 8, 1900]
Letter to Mary Moore He received her letter and they all felt compelled to write her back. Willie finished and sent his letter already. Linnet was too tired and went to bed early. He tells her what he has been doing and mentions that he had some visitors. He mentions the weather and how cold it has been. He was hoping to get a letter from her that evening, but didn't. He talks about all the rain they have had. He mentions food that he has eaten. He received a letter from Kate Wallace and a card from her. He will try to finish his letter and send it off. Willie has been visiting Priest. He again mentions the weather. He lost a tooth. He talks about the letters he is expecting and how well their milk is. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203834/
[Letter from C.B. Moore to Mary Moore, January 11, 1900]
Letter to Mary Moore from her husband C.B. Moore. Willie sent his and Linnet's letter to her. He read the paper and then went to bed. He had a hard time sleeping because of the cold. He mentions that it has been raining. He mentions that Linnet and Willie are milking and the weather is still dreary. Linnet is cooking for him and now the wind has picked up and is hurting his eyes, so he has to stay inside. He received a letter from Camilla Wallace, but none from her. By the evening it cleared up, but he thinks it may frost. He went to sleep early, although he work up because of the cold. Tommy was still over after ten o'clock. There was an incident with a negro, he got arrested. He then copies an entry from his diary of the day. He tells her to stay as long as she can and to enjoy her visit. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203840/
[Letter from C. B. Moore to Mary Moore, September 16, 1898]
He received their letter just in time. He mentions that they have been well and he feels bad for imposing on them. He is very grateful because he feels better. He wrote Will and Linnet wrote Birdie. He mentions how much it is for them to stay there. He will send a paper to Doug. He went to the train depot looking for Texans. Linnet wants to go sight seeing, she went to Colorado Springs. He mentions that his family has been gone the whole time he is visiting. He met a couple of people from Texas at the depot and a man from Tennessee. He feels bad for their hardship. He comments on how Linnet is doing on the trip. He mentions how different the women are, they ride broncos and smoke. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203770/
[Letter from C. Kingsbury Jr., December 28, 1865]
Special Order No. 123. The Chief Commissary is charged with seeing this order executed, 50lbs of sour krout and 25lbs of onion to every one hundred rations. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth186544/
[Letter from C. M. Rucker to Mother and All, September 4, 1893]
They received their letter in Paris, but they have been in Blossom for a while. They are at Nettie's Uncle's place and they are enjoying it. Ethel has been feeling better this summer. Lizzie has also been well. He hasn't heard from Solomon in a while. C. M.has been unwell and asks that they write to them in Blossom. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203688/
[Letter from Camilla Wallace to Charles B. Moore, May 10, 1896]
Letter from Camilla Wallace to Charles B. Moore in which she discusses the William Boyd family. She says she met "Auntie" and was impressed. She says that she has never known anyone else that old. She says that Mollie Moore and family are living on a coffee plantation in Mexico. She says she the fruit grown in Grand Junction, Colorado are the source of most of the funds in the valley. Camilla requests the last letter her father wrote the last day of his life that is in the possession of Charles Moore. She thanks Charles Moore for the family history he sent to her. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203715/
[Letter from Camilla Wallace to Charles Moore, October 19, 1896]
Letter from Camilla Wallace to Charles B. Moore in which she relates the health of her family; a trip up a mountain and its impact on the health of Tom; Will has a new camera; and her plans to join the camera club. Will is the secretary of the irrigation company. She is helping with the office work, which she enjoys. She plans to vote for William Jennings Bryan in the hopes of changing policies. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203718/
[Letter from Camille Wallace to Charles Moore, November 26, 1898]
Letter from Camille Wallace talking about her trip to Denver and Pueblo. She mentions that they have gone to many parties including a whist party and afternoon teas. They enjoyed reading Charles' letter that had been published in the McKinney Messenger. She reports that her sister Mollie and her family are living on a coffee plantation in Mexico and have suffered from floods. Includes the envelope. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203785/
[Letter from Campbell B. Read to Station Manager of KVTT-FM 91.7, "Request for Equal Time" - May 14, 1983]
Letter from Campbell B. Read, Ph.D. to the Station Manager of the Christian radio station KVTT 91.7 FM in Dallas. Dr. Read is requesting equal time to respond to certain claims made by Dr. Paul Cameron, Dr. Clem Mueller, and a vice officer of the Dallas Police Department on the "Point of View" talk radio program on May 13, 1983. The topic of the talk show was the health aspects of homosexual behavior. Read writes that the Federal Communications Commission requires that radio stations give equal time for rebuttal if "questionable, if not slanderous, statements are made about [minority] groups". Read, who holds a Ph. D. in Statistics, challenges the claims made by the guests on the talk show and claims that their comments about the gay community were indeed slanderous. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc177452/
[Letter from Capt. H. H. Boggess to Capt. H. K. Redway, February 17, 1865]
Letter from Capt. H. H. Boggess to Capt. H. K. Redway, in Wheeling, West Virginia, informing him of Private B.F. carpenter's furlough to Cincinnati, Ohio. The document details that Carpenter was part of the "F" company, 1st regiment, and was part of the N. Y. Veterans Cavalry. The private's furlough to Cincinnati would last 15 days and the cost of his transportation to Cincinnati was $1.50, an amount which would be docked from his pay upon his return. The letter also states that Private Carpenter would return for duty to Camp Piatt in West Virginia. A note on the lower left side details that the private was charged on payroll for his furlough on February 28, 1865. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth186340/
[Letter from Capt. H. H. Boggess to Major McPhail, February 15, 1865]
Letter from Capt. H. H. Boggess to Major McPhail, in Wheeling, West Virginia, informing him of Corporal Calvin Hull's furlough to Cincinnati, Ohio. The document details that Hull was part of the "F" company, 1st regiment, and was part of the N. Y. Veterans Cavalry. The corporal's furlough to Cincinnati would last 15 days and the cost of his transportation from Portland to Cincinnati was $3.09, an amount which would be docked from his pay upon his return. The letter also states that Corporal Hull would return for duty to Camp Piatt in West Virginia. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth186338/
[Letter from Capt. H. H. Boggess to Major McPhail, February 17, 1865]
Letter from Capt. H. H. Boggess to Major McPhail, in Wheeling, West Virginia, informing him of Private B.F. carpenter's furlough to Cincinnati, Ohio. The document details that Carpenter was part of the "F" company, 1st regiment, and was part of the N. Y. Veterans Cavalry. The private's furlough to Cincinnati would last 15 days and the cost of his transportation to Cincinnati was $1.50, an amount which would be docked from his pay upon his return. The letter also states that Private Carpenter would return for duty to Camp Piatt in West Virginia. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth186339/
[Letter from Captain H. K. Redway to Mrs. Loriette C. Redway, December 11, 1864]
Letter from Hamilton K. Redway to Loriette C. Redway which reassures his wife about their relationship and the love he has for her and their children. The letter is dated December 11, 1864 and was written while Redway was stationed at the camp in Kelly's Creek, West Virginia. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth186767/
[Letter from Captain S. Farlin to Captain Hamilton K. Redway, January 29, 1865]
Letter from Captain S. Farlin to Captain Hamilton K. Redway which deatils that Farlin has sent ten days forage for the cavalry's 181 horses. Farlin also notes that if the number of horses is incorrect for Redway to relay that information back to him in order to remedy the issue. Captain Farlin would like Redway to send the empty forage sacks by train to him so they can be credited for the month. The letter was sent to Redway while he was stationed at Kelly's Creek in West Virginia. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth186590/
[Letter from Captain S. Farlin to Captain Hamilton K. Redway, March 19, 1865]
Letter from Captain S. Farlin to Captain Hamilton K. Redway which deatils that Farlin has sent forage for 86 horses. Farlin also notes that he has sent three sacks of oats to Redway in Kelly's Creek and delevered two sacks to Redway's team located in Camp Piatt. The oats were to make up for the shortage of forage supplies during the last ten days. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth186596/
[Letter from Carter Dalton Linnet Moore, April 8, 1900]
Letter from Carter Dalton to Linnet Moore in which he confesses that he forgot to "check your trunk and have cussed myself over and over for so doing." He tells her about a dam that washed away killing nine men in Austin, Texas. He asks Linnet's advice on answering a letter from a woman. He wants to keep her as a friend, but not encourage her to think he wants more from the relationship. He say that he is thinking about going "to the Territory" next summer. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203856/
[Letter from Carter Dalton to Linnet Moore, April 19, 1900]
Letter from Carter Dalton to Linnet Moore in which he says that Lula Dalton and Mrs. White went to the university to hear William Jennings Bryan. He has "a whole train load of people" from Burnet staying with him, so that they could be in town to hear Mr. Bryan. Small post has broken out at the University. He updates Linnet on his activities, the girl he is courting, and the news of their friends. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203860/
[Letter from Carter Dalton to Linnet Moore, May 30, 1901]
Letter from Dalton Carter to Linnet Moore in which he tells her about his trip to Burnet and Llano, Texas. He also gives updates on the friends they have in common and on family members. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203907/
[Letter from Carter J. Dalton to Linnet Moore, October 8, 1901]
This is a letter from the Charles B. Moore Collection. It is written by Carter J. Dalton and is addressed to Linnet Moore. In this letter, Dalton congratulates Linnet on her upcoming wedding. Her notes that his gift for her is a receipt for her past debts. Dalton details the latest news about friends, tells Moore about a sofa cushion he received, and mentions that he travels quite a bit with Jim Cooke so Jim can visit his girl, Minnie Lewis. As he closes the letter, he notes that she will make an ideal wife and asks where the couple will live.The envelope is included with the letter. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203918/
[Letter from Carter J. Dalton to Linnet Moore, October 11, 1900]
Letter from Carter Dalton to Linnet Moore. He wanted to respond to Linnet's letter before too much time had passed. He was worried about Lula going to Dallas to visit Linnet. He is about to be on his way home to spend time with Jim Cook. Jim's mother and sister are in Austin, but he hasn't seen them. He asks about who is in love with Linnet now. He talks about his problems and asks if Linnet is coming to the San Antonio fair. He talks about Burnet and how old friends don't talk to him anymore. So he is now lonely, but he has some questions for her about graduation. He asks about her suitors and the guy that sent Lula a picture of himself. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203871/
[Letter from Cary Nimmo, October 2, 1880]
Letter from Cary Nimmo to his cousin Charles B. Moore in which he starts by commenting on Charles leaving for Texas. Mr. Nimmo talks about selling his crops, mule and a wagon to raise money. He talks about how sad his mother and Betty were To have missed Charles's visit. He also talks about the preparations he is making for his trip in November. The letter has the envelope with it. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203574/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore]
Letter fragment written by Charles B. Moore in which he said he had seen wagon load of pictures of "grand mountain scenery." He also states that he saw a Gila monster. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203789/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore]
This is a letter from the Charles B. Moore Collection. It is written by Moore to unknown recipients. In this letter, Moore details the dilemma centered on the Annie Laura story which was printed in the Rockbridge County newspaper. He provides a brief, yet detailed genealogical account of the Moore family history as well as the Anna Laura ballad for the letter's recipients. The letter's edges are damaged and some of the words are missing due to the damage. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203668/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore and Mary Moore to Linnet Moore, January 24, 1899]
Letter from Charles B. Moore to his daughter Linnet expressing concern about her health. He also says that he plans to send her $50.00. Mr. Moore tells her about the progress on his fence. He announces that Sam Thornhill has died. He says the Willy Jones says "the soldiers were all taken to Austin to the inauguration." Both Charles and Mary Moore gave details about family and friends that they have seen or heard from. Charles Moore says that he has stopped drinking coffee and has returned to "good old healthy butter milk." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203795/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to A. S. Priest, August 28, 1900]
Letter from Charles B. Moore to A. S. Priest discussing Charles Moore's declining health and his last wishes should he die in the near future. He mentions a house that he is having built and some things which he wants Mr. Priest to have in the even of his death, and he asks that Mr. Priest not discuss the contents of this letter with Mary or Linnet. Moore also shares something he wrote in his diary the previous night. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth207578/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Bindie McGee and Linnet Moore, June 26, 1901]
Letter from Charles B. Moore to Bindie McGee Linnet Moore saying that he would be glad for Bindie and Linnet to come to visit and help Mary Moore. He says that Linnet has started a trip to Springfield to visit relatives. He writes about the difficulties with the rail road keeping workers. Willy had a tooth pulled. He sends news of the activities of friends and family. Charles relates that he purchased a plow. He give updates on the work around the house and the farm. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203908/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Claude D. White, October 20, 1901]
This is a letter from the Charles B. Moore Collection. It is written by Charles B. Moore and is addressed to Claude D. White. In this letter, Moore asks White to perform some accounting for him and write him back with the total. he closes the letter by noting to write him soon and mentions that a note has been received that he and Linnet will visit. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203921/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Elizabeth Moore, Matilda Dodd, and Josephus Moore, August 1858]
Letter to Elizabeth Moore (Leiz), Matilda Dodd, and Josephus Moore from Charles B. Moore regarding Moore's activities in Paris, Texas. He wrote about an incident with a local minister and what has happened at the mill. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth207598/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Elvira D. Moore, July 7, 1850]
Letter from Charles Moore to Elvira Moore discussing his recent trip to Jerseyville, the Fourth of July celebrations there and the progress that community had made, farming, seeing King Lear at the theatre, building engines, and news of family and friends. There is an envelope addressed to Elvira D. Moore, Unionville P O, Bedford County, Tennessee. It is postmarked Nashville, and July 7, 1850 is written in pencil at the top. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203290/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Elvira Moore, July 4, 1859]
Letter to Elvira Moore from Charles B. Moore about local news. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth207600/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Elvira Moore, October 13, 1856]
Letter to Elvira Moore from Charles B. Moore about his time in Nashville and a nearby camp. Charles mentioned local politics for an election. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth207592/
[Letter from Charles B, Moore to Elvira Moore, September 29, 1856]
Letter to Elvira Moore from Charles B. Moore containing an update about local happenings and health. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth207591/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Henry Moore, November 3,1885]
Letter from Charles B. Moore to his brother Henry concerning Charles's trip to Tennessee. He writes about the rainy weather, the news from Texas, crops, and the three stable fires that have occurred in the last three weeks. He believes the fires were deliberately set. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203576/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Henry S. Moore, August 31, 1885]
This is a letter from the Charles B. Moore Collection. It is written by Charles B. Moore to his brother Henry S. Moore. In his letter, Charles updates his brother on the happenings of his trip, who he has visited, and how he enjoys seeing old friends again. He details news about a trip that Betty Thornhill is making to Dallas and he states that she may be visiting him soon, if she is not already there. He notes that the family listened to a sermon by Brother Haynes. All the family attended this sermon except Mr. Dodd. He mentioned that Henry should pass this information on to Mrs. Thornhill. Moore tells his brother about meeting new friends and old comrades as well as their siblings, but also details the business successes of family friends. He states that Sam Thornhill and Tom And Alice Wright have plans to visit Texas soon. He expresses his happiness for John Stewart who has been appointed revenue collector and will make good pay; a living which will prevent him from having to turn to hard labor for money. He details that Tim Thornhill was very badly injured from a buggy accident and mentions a robbery which occurred to a family friend as well as financial concerns surrounding this crime. He states that he has seen Alexander and Allen, but has not spoken to them about the estate of their uncle. Charles tells Henry that Jack Wood's daughter will be married and Tobe and Florence want him to accompany them to the wedding. He updates Henry on the weather and on the crops in the Gallatin area. He notes that Sally Thornhill is recovering from her illness and details additional news concerning family friends and the community. He mentions his past plans with friends and closes his letter to Henry from Gallatin. The envelope is included with the letter. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203566/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Henry S. Moore, November 18, 1857]
Letter from Charles B. Moore to Henry S. Moore discussing his work at the mill in Texas, attempts to sell a house and lots and a buggy, a recent trip to Paris, his latest business dealings, and the wildlife around the mill. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203293/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Isaac Greenwald, August 18, 1856]
Letter to Isaac Greenwald from Charles B. Moore regarding a payment owed to Greenwald for the sale of machinery. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth207590/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Josephus C. Moore, May 14, 1861]
Letter from Charles B. Moore to Josephus C. Moore discussing his recent arrival at Batesville, taking the oath of allegiance to the United States, voting against secession in Texas, the likelihood that the war will not last long, and his wish that Josephus could get some time to go home and check on the family. He also writes that Henry was pressed into service in Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203319/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Linnet and Claude White, November 16, 1901]
Letter from Charles Moore to Linnet and Claude White in which he describes his activities on the farm; the theft of buggies; and the activities of family and friends. He informs them that uncle John Stewart has died. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203929/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Linnet and Claude White, October 30, 1901]
Letter from Charles B. Moore to Claude and Linnet Moore White in which he tells them about the activities at the house and on the farm. He gives them the news on the sale of his crops. He also discusses the activities of neighbors, friends, and family. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203927/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Linnet Moore, August 11, 1898]
This is a letter from the Charles B. Moore Collection. It is written by Charles B. Moore and is addressed to Linnet Moore. In this letter, Moore informs Linnet on the goings-on in Collin County. The news includes: updates on family and friends who are visiting town, community health news, a discussion about family friends going to the nation for grapes and to find a place to rent, a dialogue about Mr. Buckly's trip west, details about community gossip, news about their cow "Old Cora," and a discussion about last evening's plans. He closes the letter by stating that he is still tempted to buy the tickets to Colorado and for Linnet to let them know when to meet her at Melissa. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203765/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Linnet Moore, January 5, 1898]
Letter from Charles Moore to Linnet Moore in which he lists all the people he has written letters to. He updates her on the activities of friends and family members. Mr. Moore is not happy with the raining weather. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203791/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Linnet Moore, January 10, 1899]
Letter from Charles Moore to his daughter Linnet in which he give advice on returning a watch that is not working. He then advises Linnet on money and lets her know that she is welcome to request more if she needs it. Mr. Moore then writes about the rainy weather and states that all his water tanks are "beautifully supplied." He also updates her on the health of friends and neighbors and notes those that have died. He gives his opinion on educating African Americans. Otto Wettstein's ("The Liberal Jeweler")receipt of December 26, 1898 is included with the letter. It states that the $25.00 solid gold watch will be sent to Linnet. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203792/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Linnet Moore, January 23, 1899]
Letter from Charles Moore to Linnet Moore in which he says that he has left it up to the jeweler to pick out the best $25.00 watch for her. He updates her on the activities of family and friends. He also tells a story about a baby who was killed at the time of a train wreck. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203794/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Linnet Moore, July 27, 1898]
This is a letter from the Charles B. Moore Collection. It is written by Charles B. Moore and is addressed to Linnet Moore. In this letter, Moore updates Linnet on the goings-on in Collin County. The news includes: a discussion about not receiving word from Linnet, details on receiving correspondence from Laura Jernigan and Jack, a weather update, community news, updates on going to the horse market, a discussion about Anderson who is much better after falling into John Chandler's well, additional community updates on friends and acquaintances, a discussion about hunting in the nation, a dialogue about receiving word that Walter Cox is dead, agricultural news, and details about a picnic above the bridges. Moore closes the letter by noting that Linnet should behave herself, have all the fun she can, and send word home often. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203762/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Linnet Moore, July 28, 1898]
This is a letter from the Charles B. Moore Collection. In this letter, Charles informs Linnet about the goings-on in Collin County. The news includes: a discussion about the cows breaking into Priest's field, agricultural updates, a dialogue about Charley Rutledge's boys who were badly injured (one was fatally injured), details about the day's agenda, community news, an update on the horse buyer who arrives by train, and a discussion about purchasing train tickets to Colorado. The envelope is included with this letter. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203763/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Linnet Moore, July 29-30, 1898]
This is a letter from the Charles B. Moore Collection. It is written by Charles B. Moore and is addressed to Linnet Moore. In this letter, Moore informs Linnet about the goings-on in Collin County. The news includes: a confirmation on the receipt of Linnet's card, an update about Anderson who fell down Chandler's well, a discussion about the Rutledge burial of one of their three sons, news about Jack Kelly's death, community news, agricultural updates, a dialogue about correspondences received, a discussion about harvest delays in Gallatin due to rain, details about purchasing train tickets to destinations in Colorado, and updates on the well-being of family members and their activities at present. In a brief letter, dated July 30, 1898, Moore discusses the family's milk cow "Old Cora," details community news, and notes that Linnet has received catalogs from Oak Cliff and Fort Worth. He tells her that he would like her to go to school this coming session, but he feels that their excursion to Colorado would provide her with more experience than attending a session. He details some places they will visit on their trip. He wishes she would write soon and send word for Betty and the family to write as well. he closes the letter by noting that he hears dishes rattling and will soon be eating breakfast. The envelope is included with the letter. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203764/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Linnet Moore, March 5, 1900]
Letter from Charles Moore to Linnet Moore in which he tells her about the activities of the neighbors, putting in a garden, and the weather. He writes about fences, burning fields, and crops. He asks Linnet to let him know how Paddy performed in his opera role. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203851/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Linnet Moore, March 14, 1900]
Letter from Charles B. Moore to his daughter, Linnet Moore, in which he writes her about the daily activities of his and Mary's household. Charles gives the news of the farm and the activities of their friends and family. The picture man came and he now has a picture of Henry that is first rate. He ends the letter by saying that "if the big ships come to Galveston go to see them." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203853/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Linnet Moore, March 19, 1900]
Letter from Charles B. Moore to his daughter Linnet in which he referred to her trip to Galveston, Texas. He tells her about the activities on the farm. He also says that he drove by a young woman who addressed him as "Uncle Charlie," but he did not recognize her. He also says that one of the legs on his milking stool broke off while he was using it. He was not injured. He also reports that he has been looking after the graveyard. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203893/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Linnet Moore, November 16, 1898]
Letter From Charles B. Moore to his daughter, Linnet, giving her advice on her education and describing life in their household to give her a picture of home. He tells an amusing story of sleeping on his cot at night and waking up at 4:00 AM. He is able to start the morning fire, "shod, breeched, and coated" himself without ever leaving his chair. He talks about prohibition and how wonderful it will be when it happens in Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203780/