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  Partner: UNT Archives
 Resource Type: Letter
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Linnet Moore, November 20-22, 1898]
Letter expressing concern that Linnet has not written, gives details of drought, discusses the building of a "tank," the sale of a horse, surgery that Mr.Rutledge had and news of his recovery, the killing of a squirrel, a discussion about drawing water for his animals and leading them to the trough, news about painting the buggy, details about his afternoon routine which included eating lunch and tending to the animals, community news about friends and neighbors, news about finishing the tank, weather updates, and details on daily routine for November 21st and 22nd in 1898. The letter includes a list of the highs and lows in temperature of the winter season thus far. In a note written on the list, Moore details that he wished Linnet would write more often. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203783/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Mary Ann Moore, August 22, 1989]
This is a letter from the Charles B. Moore Collection. It is written by Charles B. Moore and is addressed to Mary Ann Moore. In this letter, Moore details his trip to Colorado for Mary Ann Moore and Laura Jernigan. He notes the town they are staying in at present, Manitou, and mentions their living quarters. He details the activities they have been experiencing such as hiking, searching for caves, and riding electric trolley's up to Pike's peak. He discusses that once on top of the peak, Linnet decided it would be great to stay in one of the little cottages that line the valley. During their stay in one of these cottages, Linnet, Charles, and their fellow travelers meet an interesting Texan. Charles states to Mary that his only regret is that she and the rest of the family are not able to experience the wonders he is seeing in Colorado. He mentions their plans for that day and describes the landscape for Mary. He discusses the railroad tunnels and the people he sees traveling up and down Pike's Peak on mules. He closes the letter stating he is sending a card that their traveling companion has collected and that both Linnet and He are glad to be in such good company. The envelop is included with the letter. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203766/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Mary Ann Moore, August 24, 1898]
This is a letter from the Charles B. Moore Collection. It is written by Charles B. Moore and is addressed to Mary Ann Moore. In this letter, Moore discusses the days agenda and tells Mary they are getting ready for breakfast. He details a conversation he had with the Texan who is bunking next to their room and shares her plans, past and future, for this trip. He notes that they will have a picnic today and that he is collecting items from every where for Mary. He mentions that he met a woman who knew Will Wallace in Grand Junction. He also met an old Tennessean and "got a dollar worth out of him" in conversation. They plan to travel across the mountains on Sunday and do not know yet what route they will take for that expedition. He tells Mary she should go out and make a day out of an excursion somewhere close to home. He states that experiencing nature for one day is worth three days of household chores. He details correspondences received and the picture Linnet after riding up the canyon by mule. He mentions their lunch plans and closes the letter. The envelope is included with the letter. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203767/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Mary Ann Moore, January 13, 1900]
This is a letter from the Charles B. Moore Collection. It is written by Charles B. Moore and is addressed to Mary Ann Moore. In this letter, Charles informs Mary of the goings-on in Advalorem, Texas. The news includes: detailed accounts of daily chores around the house, updates on agricultural chores around the land such as clearing wood, stacking corn, and general maintenance of the farm, a confirmation about receiving Mary's letter, a discussion about the news from Gallatin,TN, a dialogue about the possibility of Mary not receiving all the letters Linnet and Charles sent to her, details about Will's trip to church, and a recount of his afternoon and evening. In Moore's letter dated January 14, 1900, he discusses the day's chores and notes that this day is a glorious one. He notes that he showered and got ready for the day, but needed a bit of hep from Linnet with his dressing. His mention community news and details what Linnet prepared for their dinner. He tells Mary that her absence allows Linnet and himself to take on responsibilities that usually fall on Mary, but he is happy to take them on because it means that Mary can relax when she is in Gallatin. He thanks her for taking care of their home while he and Linnet were in Colorado. He notes that it is now their turn to take of the home while Mary is away with her family. He closes the letter by giving a weather update and noting that this letter will go into the mail in the morning. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203842/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Mary Ann Moore, January 15, 1900]
This is a letter from the Charles B. Moore Collection. It is written by Charles B. Moore and is addressed to Mary Ann Moore. In this letter, Charles informs Mary Ann of the goings-on in Advalorem, TX while she is in Gallatin, TN visiting kin. The news includes: updates on daily chores and agricultural chores, community news, updates about renting Linnet's land and the south field, and gossip from Linnet and friends. In his next letter dated, January 16, 1900, Moore details abut his morning routine and gives a weather update before he closes the letter. The envelope is included with the letter. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203843/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Mary Ann Moore, November 24, 1897]
Letter from Charles B. Moore to his wife, Mary Moore, in which he updates her on the new house, the farm work, the health of friends and family. He learned from a letter written by Lizzy Jernigan that Laura Jernigan has been ill. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203744/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Mary Ann Moore, October 22, 1897]
This is a letter from the Charles B. Moore Collection. it is written by Charles B. Moore and is addressed to Mary Ann Moore. In this letter, Charles informs Mary that he has sent her trunk key to Gallatin and there is no need to break it open. He notes that he has sent a telegram to Will letting Mary know about the key. He discusses the daily chores with her, the weather, and updates her on the goings-on at home since her departure. In his second letter, written in the early morning of October 22, Moore details the happenings since Mary has left for Tennessee. He notes the weather conditions, mentions the chores that He and Linnet have performed, and states that the first night without Mary was lonesome. He details that both he an Linnet miss her very much. He discusses going to Melissa to send the key with the letter and to send a telegram to Will McGee. On this second letter, black threads remain where the key was attached to the paper. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203731/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Mary Ann Moore, October 28, 1897]
This is a letter from the Charles B. Moore Collection. It is written by Charles B. Moore and is addressed to Mary Ann Moore. In this letter, Charles updates Mary on the goings-on in Collin County since her departure to Gallatin, Tennessee. The news includes: a confirmation on receiving Mary's correspondence, news on the weather, an update on the house construction, details about Mrs Priest and Linnet's visit to her and to Jordan, community news, a discussion about real estate, a dialogue about daily chores, news about the fair and plans for Linnet to go with friends, update on the night's weather, details about the health of friends, and news about family. He notes to Mary that she should not worry about home and stay visiting her family as long as she wants. He closes the letter by updating Mary on the time and temperature. The envelope is included with this letter. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203734/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Mary Ann Moore, September 9, 1898]
This is a letter from the Charles B. Moore Collection. In this letter, Moore discusses the goings-on during his trip to Colorado. He details to Mary Ann that they received her letter yesterday and are, at present, writing letter to her and to friends back home. He mentions that he has received correspondence from Tom and Stella from Salt Lake and from their return trip from Salt Lake which found them again in Manitou. He thanks Mary Ann and Laura Jernigan for taking care of the home front while he and Linnet experience Colorado. He notes what he and Linnet have been up to while in Grand Junction. Moore discusses the kin they have visited and stayed with who live in or near Grand Junction. He also discusses society in Colorado and how women are more self-reliant and have the right to vote. The plans are to leave Grand Junction in a few days for Manitou then Denver. He notes that Tom has sent word that Manitou is deserted at present and also sent Charles a Dall Morning newspaper. He closes the letter by telling Mary Ann to direct her next letter to Manitou and that he will travel to the post office soon. The envelope is included with the letter. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203768/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Mary Moore and Birdie McGee, November 9, 1897]
Letter from Charles B. Moore to Mary Moore and Birdie McGee in which he updates them on the cold weather; harvesting pears with Linnet; and the successes and failures of the garden and the crops. He also talks about the continuing construction on the house. He says that Billy Smith's daughter died. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203740/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Mary Moore, December 2, 1897]
Letter from Charles B. Moore to his wife, Mary Moore, in which he updates her on his activities and what has been happening on the farm. He has a good potato crop and is storing part of it in Linnet's room. He writes that they are experiencing a bad "norther" with snow, strong winds and cold temperatures. He received a letter that said that Laura Jernigan had recovered from her illness. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203745/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Mary Moore, December 22, 1899]
Letter from Charles B. Moore to Mary Moore in which he tells her about the weather; Linnet's cooking; and how wood was brought up to his house. He relates his and Linnet's activities and some news of friends and family. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203824/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Mary Moore, December 23, 1899]
Letter from Charles Moore to Mary Moore in which he lets her know the details of the weather; updates her on the activities of friends and family; and gives news of the farm. He writes about his and Linnet's health. He also updates Mary on the health of friends. He describes the preparations for Christmas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203825/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Mary Moore, December 28, 1899]
Letter from Charles B. Moore to Mary Moore about his activities since Christmas. He says that Bill Bounds made a trip to Texas, but was not met at the stations by friends. He states that Lila Franklin telephoned Bill Bounds to invite him to have Christmas with her family. Mr. Moore relates the details of the murder of one of the Combs brothers. His brother is in jail as he is believe to be the murderer. Tommie Horn came to stay with Mr. Moore while Linnet went out to a party. He wants Mary to ask Will if there is a connection between phosphate and the old dye stone Will's father used as a building material. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203827/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Mary Moore, November 3 - 4, 1897]
Letter from Charles B. Moore to his wife Mary in which he expresses happiness that she is out of danger of contracting "yellow jack" (yellow fever). He hopes that Mary will be able to visit with Sally Thornhill. He says that he went to town with Linnet to buy flour, shoes, and other supplies. He said that he has acquired a new supply of pork. He states that it is hard to make up a party as boarding schools have taken so many of the young people away from the neighborhood. He updates Mary on the health and activities of family and friends. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203736/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Mary Moore, November 5, 1897]
Letter from Charles B. Moore to his wife Mary in which he informs her about the signing of a $50.00 note. He tells her that he hopes she is enjoying her outing and not to hurry home. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203737/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Mary Moore, November 12, 1897]
Letter from Charles B. Moore to his wife Mary in which he writes about the weather, the farm animals, his and Linnet's activities, and a new house that is being built by Bob Bright. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203746/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Mary Moore, November 17, 1887]
Letter... texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203588/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Mary Moore, November 20, 1897]
Letter from Charles B. Moore to Mary Moore that covers his activities, the weather, the crops, and the farm's animals. He wrote that Linnet was invited to a party. He also shares his views on several members of their community. He recounts the work to churn butter. He also writes about building a chimney. He recounts Linnet's work around the house and on the farm. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203742/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Mary Moore, October 29 - November 1, 1897]
Letter from Charles Moore to his wife Mary in which he writes about a trip Linnet is making to a fair. He also writes about picking cotton; what he has to eat; the pear crop; and requests information on family and friends. He writes about the building project he in involved in. Linnet reports on the fair she attended. She had fun, but the fair was "a poor thing." He said Linnet's trip cost $2.30. He lists who was at the fair and what they did. He discusses the rain and its effect on different crops. He states that there were four new cases of yellow fever at Memphis. He lists the activities and chores performed by Linnet. He updates Mary on the people he has seen and heard from. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203735/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Mr. Kelly]
This is a letter from the Charles B. Moore Collection. It is written to a Mr. Kelly from Charles B. Moore. In this letter, Moore updates Mr. Kelly on news about a speech and its possible publication in a political paper. Included in this letter is a discussion about Mrs. Grundy and her role against the speech's publication. The letter is undated. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203661/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to O. P. Reed]
This is a letter from the Charles B. Moore Collection. It is written by Charles B. Moore and is addressed to O. P. Reed. In the letter, Moore discusses literature, a picture drawn by O. P. Reed, news about friends, and a dialogue about the snow. At the bottom of the letter, he recalls a brief history of his life for Reed, detailing major life events in his sixty six years of living in both Tennessee and Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203657/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Patty Brown, March 1891]
This is a letter from the Charles B. Moore Collection. It is written by Moore to Patty Brwon. In the letter, Charles discusses the Annie Laura story and gives Brown a brief, yet detailed family history. Highlighting major life events, he notes how he was born in Gallatin, moved to Texas, and moved away from Texas during the war. He also details his work with mills,how he changed career paths, and when he was married. This letter is dated March 1891. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203659/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Robert Hall, November 3]
Letter from Charles B. Moore to Robert Hall, a geologist, in which he says that he will try to answer Mr. Hall's questions about Collin County, Texas. He describes the soil, "black waxy", and the white rock underneath it, limestone. Charles states that the limestone is often used to build chimneys. He also describes digging a well and the layers of rock in it. He mixes the hard well water with rain water to soften it. A diagram of the soil and rock of Collin County is included. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203720/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Sam P. Henderson, September 16, 1885]
This is a letter from the Charles B. Moore Collection. It is written by Charles B. Moore and is addressed to Sam P. Henderson. In the letter, Charles updates Sam on news from Gallatin, Tennessee and it includes: the receipt of Sam's letters and an acknowledgement of what was said about their home in the letters, details about Mary Ann's and his 'circuits' to visit family and friends in Tennessee, a dialogue about Kite, the date of return trip that has yet to be solidified, the corn haul and the approval to proceed with the gathering of this crop, approval to sow wheat before the Moore's return, a discussion about the poor weather and its affect on the second sorghum crop, details about his last 'circuit' through abundant corn and tobacco crops in Tennessee as well as updates on famine stricken counties, a dialogue to send Betty Thornhill a message about his circuit to see her kin, and a message for Henry about a gift he received for him from Tom Wright. Charles Closes his letter by telling him that Linnet will bring some souvenirs to share with her kin and family friends when they return. The envelope is included with the letter. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203569/
[Letter from Charles B. Moore to Will Boyd, November 3, 1873]
Letter from Charles B. Moore in Collin County to Will Boyd, Phelps, Missouri discussing the poor crops that year, including corn and wheat and the slightly better cotton. He discusses the large volume of emigrants entering the area looking for cheap land who are willing to work. He mentions a visit from Uncle Bill Moore from Atlanta, Aunt Polly Winham from Jerseyville, Illinois, and other family members. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203379/
[Letter from Charles B. Wallace to Sy and Will Wallace, December 6]
This is a letter from the Charles B. Moore Collection. It is written by Charles B. Moore and is addressed to Sy and Will Wallace. In this letter, Moore details a genealogical account of the Wallace family. He provides a brief, yet detailed family history. The history includes a narrative of the Wallace elders, a list of the children born to Joseph and Mary Wallace, and a list of the children born to John and Matilda Wallace. The letter is dated December 6th and the year is unidentified. It is damaged along the edges of the letter and some words are missing due to the damage. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203660/
[Letter from Charles L. and Lula Watkins to Claude, Linnet, and Ruth White, January 24, 1917]
Letter to Claude, Linnet, and Ruth White from Charles and Lula Watkins. Charles writes of his sympathies for the passing of Linnet's mother and reflects on the help he received from Linnet's parents when he came to Texas in 1880. Lula writes of how she wants the Whites to visit them when they come to the area. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204149/
[Letter from Charles L. Watkins to Claude D. White, September 30, 1908]
Letter from Charles L. Watkins to Claude D. White discussing Claude going to Omaha, Nebraska and some upcoming civil service examinations that he can take there for the positions of post office clerk and carrier. There is an envelope addressed to Mr. Claude D. White, R-4 Box 25, McKinney, Texas. The return address for Mr. Watkins is 3416 Pratt [?], Omaha, Nebraska. The envelope is postmarked September 30, 1908. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203994/
[Letter from Charles Moore]
Letter from Charles Moore relating stories he heard from a man named Nicholas while riding on the train. The man claimed to be represent a publisher out of Philadelphia. In his early years in Texas, long before the "War of Unpleasantness," he traded a law library worth of books to Governor Henderson in exchange for land. He says that Sam Houston claimed that Texas annexation would have occurred 10 years earlier if they had followed a plan that Governor Jackson had set up. Robert E. Lee also refused to write his biography because it would involve him relating a negative story about Jefferson Davis. Apparently, Lee had recommended they surrender early in the war because continuing would devastate the Confederacy. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203244/
[Letter from Charles Moore, August 4, 1859]
Letter from Charles Moore to a friend regarding local news. The lower horizontal half of the document is missing. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203296/
[Letter from Charles Moore, March 1, 1864]
Letter from Charles Moore to an unidentified person discussing family matters and news. He also writes about the exemptions a person could have to get out of compulsory military service in the south: owning 600 cattle, owning 20 slaves, or being in the ministry. He mentions a Unionist friend who escaped service via the latter. He states that 42 men have been hanged for their Union sympathies. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth207633/
[Letter from Charles Moore, March 9]
Letter from Charles Moore containing a toast and some local news. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203350/
[Letter from Charles Moore to Elvira, Josephus, Matilda, and Ziza Moore, January 21, 1865]
Letter from Charles Moore to Josephus, Elvira, Matilda, and Ziza Moore in which a transcribed letter from John Dixon recounts lawless times in Izard County, Arkansas. Charles goes on to write about his opinions on law and order, and then relays local news about friends and family. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203346/
[Letter from Charles Moore to Elvira Moore and Jo, November 22, 1871]
Letter from Charles Moore to Elvira Moore and Jo (perhaps Wallace). The letter mentions births, deaths, health of friends, family, and neighbors, as well as farming concerns. Murders and attempted murders are also discussed. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth207681/
[Letter from Charles Moore to Elvira Moore, June 5, 1865]
Letter from Charles Moore to Elvira Moore regarding family health, a successful crop, and the postwar fate of some people known to his family. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203358/
[Letter from Charles Moore to Elvira Moore, October 21, 1871]
Letter to Elvira Moore from Charles Moore discussing his trip to Sherman, Texas, with Henry Moore to have wheat processed into flour, an account of the health of family and friends, and the transport of a man named Parker to Sherman, Texas in order to stand trial for the murder of a person named Peacock. Portions of the document have been destroyed and are illegible. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth207678/
[Letter from Charles Moore to Henry and Elvira Moore, October 29, 1870]
Transcript of a letter from Charles Moore to Henry and Elvira Moore, discussing gastrointestinal illness, machinery, and a mill. Damage has removed several portions of the letter along a vertical line. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth207664/
[Letter from Charles Moore to Josephus Moore and Elvira Moore, January 14, 1865]
Letter from Charles Moore to Josephus Moore and Elvira Moore that contains a transcribed letter from John Dixon. Dixon's letter contains news of refugees and of Henry Moore. Charles' letter contains local news and news of widespread friends and family members. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203345/
[Letter from Charles Moore to Josephus Moore and family, March 6, 1864]
Letter from Charles Moore to Josephus Moore and family, discussing local and family news. There has been a rash of horse thieving in the area. A Union deserter, Captain Mortimer Scott, is among the twelve men captured. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth207634/
[Letter from Charles Moore to Josephus Moore, April 15, 1865]
Letter from Charles Moore to Josephus Moore relaying news from Henry and Sabina Moore about Confederate banditry, followed by other local news regarding the Civil War winding down. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203353/
[Letter from Charles Moore to Josephus Moore, February 29, 1864]
Letter from Charles Moore to Josephus Moore discussing both family news and news of the Civil War. Questions over who is a Confederate or Union sympathizer are raised. Sam Houston's death is mentioned. In addition, there is news of a small colony of Union sympathizers has formed around Pilot Grove that asks to be left alone. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth207632/
[Letter from Charles Moore to Josephus Moore, January 6, 1859]
Letter from Charles Moore to Josephus Moore regarding business with local Native tribes and observations about the Christian missionaries among them. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth203295/
[Letter from Charles Moore to Josephus Moore, July 10, 1864]
Letter from Charles Moore to Josephus Moore containing local and family news, including mention of a drought. Charles also writes about the tension between Union sympathizers and Confederates in Texas, as well as several rebel deserters he has met. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth207643/
[Letter from Charles Moore to Josephus Moore, July 12, 1864]
Letter from Charles Moore to Josephus Moore about local news and discussing politics. Charles discusses the war, the fall of Atlanta, and the death of Union General James McPherson. Portions of the letter have been omitted due to damage. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth207645/
[Letter from Charles Moore to Josephus Moore, June 15, 1864]
Letter from Charles Moore to Josephus Moore, wherein Charles copies and forwards a letter from Jim Wilson to be sent to Wilson's family. Jim Wilson is writing from Rock Island Prison in Illinois, thanking Charles for his offer of money and offering some news. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth207640/
[Letter from Charles Moore to Josephus Moore, March 13, 1864]
Letter from Charles Moore to Josephus Moore, in which Charles has copied and forwarded a message from Captain C. C. Allen regarding the pervasive thievery in Izard County, Arkansas, and that Moore would do well not to return. He also discusses some local news, including further arrests of a gang of horse thieves. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth207635/
[Letter from Charles Moore to Josephus Moore, March 1864]
Letter from Charles Moore to Josephus Moore, in which Charles copies and forwards a letter by E. D. Rushing. Rushing wrote about the whereabouts of Charles' brother and sister, Henry and Sabina, and of the violence in Izard County, Arkansas. Rushing reports that his two eldest daughters and their husbands are dead. He then describes how Union sympathizers are seeking a new constitution in Arkansas. Rushing concludes with his ideas about the Civil War being a race war and that non-white races must be forced out of the country. Charles Moore then adds a conclusion, lamenting the state of things. A small portion of the top of each page is missing. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth207636/
[Letter from Charles Moore to Josephus Moore, May 25, 1864]
Letter from Charles Moore to Josephus Moore, relating local and family news, as well as news about the continuing war. Charles gives a brief account of his conscription into the Confederate army and expresses a desire to never be caught by Confederates again. He gives some news on the various troop movements and battles. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth207638/
[Letter from Charles Moore to Liza Moore, September 19, 1864]
Letter from Charles Moore to Liza Moore, wherein Charles talks about troubles coming from the war and hoping for peace to come soon. He copies a letter from his Uncle H. C. "Bill" Moore regarding the sacking of Atlanta. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth207647/