[600 Block S. May]

[600 Block S. May]

Date: June 1991
Creator: Hardy, Heck, Moore
Description: Photograph of the 600 Block S. May taken from the road. Photo was taken for the Historic Resources Survey of Palestine, Texas 1989-1991.
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
[400 Block S. Michaux - Reagan School]

[400 Block S. Michaux - Reagan School]

Date: June 1991
Creator: Hardy, Heck, Moore
Description: Photograph of the 400 Block S. Michaux taken from the road. Photo was taken for the Historic Resources Survey of Palestine, Texas 1989-1991. The old Reagan School is a premier example of Tudor Revival style and is among the city’s most outstanding architectural landmarks. In July 1915 Palestinians voted for a $100,000 bond issue to cover construction costs for this building, which replaced an earlier high school in the city’s business district. Prominent Fort Worth architects Marshall R. Sanguinet and Carl Gordon Staats designed the building, while A.W. Flynt, also of Fort Worth, served as general contractor. Completed in the spring of 1916, the new school was designed for an enrollment of 300 students. From 1939 through 1966 the building served as the city’s junior high school. It was officially renamed the John H. Reagan Junior High School in 1955. From 1966 until 1976 the building housed elementary grades. After that time it was abandoned and stood vacant for several years. In 1981 a local preservation group rehabilitated the school and converted it into a museum. It remains the “Museum for East Texas Culture” today.
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
[600 Block S. May]

[600 Block S. May]

Date: June 1991
Creator: Hardy, Heck, Moore
Description: Photograph of the 600 Block S. May taken from the road. Photo was taken for the Historic Resources Survey of Palestine, Texas 1989-1991.
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
[400 Block S. Michaux - Reagan School]

[400 Block S. Michaux - Reagan School]

Date: June 1991
Creator: Hardy, Heck, Moore
Description: Photograph of the 400 Block S. Michaux taken from the road. Photo was taken for the Historic Resources Survey of Palestine, Texas 1989-1991. The old Reagan School is a premier example of Tudor Revival style and is among the city’s most outstanding architectural landmarks. In July 1915 Palestinians voted for a $100,000 bond issue to cover construction costs for this building, which replaced an earlier high school in the city’s business district. Prominent Fort Worth architects Marshall R. Sanguinet and Carl Gordon Staats designed the building, while A.W. Flynt, also of Fort Worth, served as general contractor. Completed in the spring of 1916, the new school was designed for an enrollment of 300 students. From 1939 through 1966 the building served as the city’s junior high school. It was officially renamed the John H. Reagan Junior High School in 1955. From 1966 until 1976 the building housed elementary grades. After that time it was abandoned and stood vacant for several years. In 1981 a local preservation group rehabilitated the school and converted it into a museum. It remains the “Museum for East Texas Culture” today.
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
[421 S. Magnolia - Alexander White Gregg House]

[421 S. Magnolia - Alexander White Gregg House]

Date: June 1991
Creator: Hardy, Heck, Moore
Description: Newton Barnes built a one-story cottage on this property in 1874 and George W. and Adelina Angle enlarged the home in 1883. The second floor was added in 1892 by Congressman Alexander White Gregg and his wife, Mary and it was the primary residence of the Greggs during the height of his polotical career. Honored National Statesman from Palestine, Congressman A.W. Gregg (1855-1919) was a member of a distinguished southern family. He graduated from the University of Virginia School of Law, practiced law in Palestine for a time, and was in the State Senate, 1886-1888. He served as the U.S. Congressman from the Seventh Congressional District from 1903-1919, and was instrumental in securing Galveston from further hurricane devastation by sponsoring legislation to build the Galveston Seawall in 1908. Congressman Gregg was married twice; first to Mary Bridges and secondly to Mary Brooks; and fathered four children. He died in 1919 and his funeral was held in this home. Mrs. Gregg remained living in this house until 1924, when she sold it to John H. Silliman who turned it into apartments. Nancy Foy Archer purchased the house in 2001 and she stadilized the building, painted the exterior and installed a new ...
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
[400 Block S. Michaux - Reagan School]

[400 Block S. Michaux - Reagan School]

Date: June 1991
Creator: Hardy, Heck, Moore
Description: Photograph of the 400 Block S. Michaux taken from the road. Photo was taken for the Historic Resources Survey of Palestine, Texas 1989-1991. The old Reagan School is a premier example of Tudor Revival style and is among the city’s most outstanding architectural landmarks. In July 1915 Palestinians voted for a $100,000 bond issue to cover construction costs for this building, which replaced an earlier high school in the city’s business district. Prominent Fort Worth architects Marshall R. Sanguinet and Carl Gordon Staats designed the building, while A.W. Flynt, also of Fort Worth, served as general contractor. Completed in the spring of 1916, the new school was designed for an enrollment of 300 students. From 1939 through 1966 the building served as the city’s junior high school. It was officially renamed the John H. Reagan Junior High School in 1955. From 1966 until 1976 the building housed elementary grades. After that time it was abandoned and stood vacant for several years. In 1981 a local preservation group rehabilitated the school and converted it into a museum. It remains the “Museum for East Texas Culture” today.
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
[600 Block S. May]

[600 Block S. May]

Date: June 1991
Creator: Hardy, Heck, Moore
Description: Photograph of the 600 Block S. May taken from the road. Photo was taken for the Historic Resources Survey of Palestine, Texas 1989-1991.
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
[217 W. Main]

[217 W. Main]

Date: June 1991
Creator: Hardy, Heck, Moore
Description: Photograph of 217 W. Main taken from the road. Photo was taken for the Historic Resources Survey of Palestine, Texas 1989-1991.
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
[400 Block S. Michaux - Reagan School]

[400 Block S. Michaux - Reagan School]

Date: June 1991
Creator: Hardy, Heck, Moore
Description: Photograph of the 400 Block S. Michaux taken from the road. Photo was taken for the Historic Resources Survey of Palestine, Texas 1989-1991. The old Reagan School is a premier example of Tudor Revival style and is among the city’s most outstanding architectural landmarks. In July 1915 Palestinians voted for a $100,000 bond issue to cover construction costs for this building, which replaced an earlier high school in the city’s business district. Prominent Fort Worth architects Marshall R. Sanguinet and Carl Gordon Staats designed the building, while A.W. Flynt, also of Fort Worth, served as general contractor. Completed in the spring of 1916, the new school was designed for an enrollment of 300 students. From 1939 through 1966 the building served as the city’s junior high school. It was officially renamed the John H. Reagan Junior High School in 1955. From 1966 until 1976 the building housed elementary grades. After that time it was abandoned and stood vacant for several years. In 1981 a local preservation group rehabilitated the school and converted it into a museum. It remains the “Museum for East Texas Culture” today.
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
[600 Block S. May]

[600 Block S. May]

Date: June 1991
Creator: Hardy, Heck, Moore
Description: Photograph of the 600 Block S. May taken from the road. Photo was taken for the Historic Resources Survey of Palestine, Texas 1989-1991.
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
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