The Hexagon Hotel [With History]

The Hexagon Hotel [With History]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: Construction of the Hexagon Hotel was started in 1895 and completed in 1897. It was constructed of long-leaf yellow pine; the exterior was cypress siding, and the roof was covered with hand-split cypress shingles. The interior was of "Heart of Pine" wood. All the stone work was done by two English stone-masons. The building was constructed with pegs and square nails. The four staircases inside spiraled down through the five floors. The lobby floor was covered with hexagon-shaped tan, brown and blue tiles. The rooms were hexagon-shaped with a bath between every two rooms. The hotel was torn down for the materials in the building in September 1959. (This information is found on page 106 "Time Was in Mineral Wells" by A.F. Weaver) The "Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.)" remarks (in 1966) that "Rates in season were $1.50 per day; out of season, $1.00 per day, which included bath privileges. Meals were available at nearby hotels." The "Star" goes on to relate that the Hexagon Hotel was converted into apartments at some time prior to its utter demolition, but it dodes not say exactly when this conversion was made.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Hexagon Hotel]

[The Hexagon Hotel]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The popular Hexagon Hotel, built in 1897, was the first structure in Mineral Wells to be electrically-lit. Electricity was supplied by a DC power plant next door. It was located at 701 N. Oak, and was torn down September 1959. This photograph is found on page 177 of "Time Was.." 2nd Ed. by A. F. Weaver.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Hexagon Hotel - drawing]

[The Hexagon Hotel - drawing]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: A photograph of a painting of the Hexagon Hotel is shown here. The unique Hexagon Hotel was the subject of many artists and photographers during its existence. Built in 1897 by David Galbraith, inventor of the paper clip, it was the first hotel in Mineral Wells to have electricity in every room. It also had outside exposure in every room for ventilation in the summer. Alvis Lynch, the painter of the picture, was the grandson of Judge Lynch, who founded Mineral Wells. He lived in California, but presented the original painting to the Heritage Association when he visited Mineral Wells. His signature--and the date 1977--is visible on the lower right-hand portion of the photograph.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Hexagon Hotel and Convention Hall]

[The Hexagon Hotel and Convention Hall]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: A hexagon-shaped hotel was designed and built by David G. Galbraith, and located in Mineral Wells in the 700 block of N. Oak Street. Construction was started in 1895 and completed in 1897. The hotel was the first electrically-lighted hotel in the city, and the hexagon shape was designed to achieve maximum air circulation 61 years before air-conditioning became available. Mr. Galbraith was also the inventor of the paper clip; and along with five other men, he was the inventor of the synthetic fiber acetate. The hotel was demolished in 1959. The Convention Hall building at 715 N. Oak Street, located next door to the Hexagon Hotel, was built in 1925 on the site of Mineral Well's first electrical generating plant (DC). The Convention Hall was torn down by the city in 1977.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library