The Famous Water Pavilion--Damron Hotel

The Famous Water Pavilion--Damron Hotel

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The Famous Water Wells maintained a pavilion in the lobby of the Damron Hotel, where guests could partake of mineral water. This hotel was located on the corner of W. Hubbard Street and SW 1st Street. It burned down in 1975.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[An Early Bird's-Eye-View of Mineral Wells]

[An Early Bird's-Eye-View of Mineral Wells]

Date: 1882?
Creator: unknown
Description: A very early panoramic view of Mineral Wells (taken around 1882) from East Mountain and looking southwest is illustrated here. Locations identified by numbers are: 1: Judge Lynch's cabin, now Lynch Plaza at S. Oak Avenue and E. Hubbard Street; 2: The Mesquite Street well, middle of NE 1st Avenue (the second well in town, now [2008] abandoned); 3:The current center of downtown Mineral Wells, showing the intersection of Oak Avenue (US 281) and Hubbard Street (US Highway 180); 4: The current Fire and Police Departments; 5: S. Oak Avenue; 6: The Southern House Hotel; 7: The present "Business District", NE 1st Avenue; and 8: N. Oak Avenue (a residential area at the time.)
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 1 of 21, Dec. 22, 1975]

[The Damron Hotel Fire, 1 of 21, Dec. 22, 1975]

Date: December 22, 1975
Creator: unknown
Description: A fire destroyed the Damron Hotel, December 22, 1975. The hotel was located at 109 West Hubbard Street, facing north, before the unfortunate conflagration. The fire also destroyed Davidson Hardware, located in the same block.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
The Bethesda Bath House

The Bethesda Bath House

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: This is a photograph of the Bethesda Bath House was formerly located 406 N. Oak, with the top of the front of Chautauqua (to the northeast of the bath house) visible over the top of the roof's gable at the left side of the building. The Bethesda Bath House apparently contained the office of Dr. G. W. Hubbard. Bathing in the mineral waters was considered a health treatment, and was recommended by local doctors. There is a structure seen behind the bath house in the lower right quadrant of the photograph. This may have been the doctor's residence.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library