Texas Carlsbad Water

Texas Carlsbad Water

Date: 1895?
Creator: unknown
Description: A group of people stand outside Texas Carlsbad Water. The Carlsbad was one of the earlier, and more popular drinking pavilions in Mineral Wells. It was located on NW 1st. Avenue, at NW 4th Street, directly across the street west of the Crazy Well. Its slogan was: Makes a man love HIS wife, Makes a woman love HER husband, Robs the divorce court of its business, Takes the temper out of red-headed people, Puts ginger into ginks and pepper into plodders. Please note the supports for possible electric lines, the unpaved street, and the horses obscurely visible at the far right of the photograph.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Crazy Well, Mineral Wells, Texas

Crazy Well, Mineral Wells, Texas

Date: 1890?
Creator: unknown
Description: This is a picture of the first Crazy Well drinking pavilion, the first such facility in the city. When a Mr. Wiggins dug the third well in town, it was frequented by a "crazy woman" who was eventually cured of her dementia. Because of the word-of-mouth publicity, people came from miles around to drink the health-giving water. A house was built around the well for the convenience of the customers. The highly successful business attracted competition, and one of the most popular health spas in the nation grew from these beginnings.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
The "Gibson Well" Mineral Wells, Texas

The "Gibson Well" Mineral Wells, Texas

Date: 1900?
Creator: unknown
Description: Shown here is a picture of the first Gibson Well drinking pavilion. Located in the 700 block of what is now NW 2nd Avenue, it was one of the first drinking pavilions in the city. An expanded pavilion replaced the one in this picture, and it became one of the more popular social gathering places in town. The Christian Church now [2008] occupies the entire city block on which the Gibson Well was located.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[An Early Parade on N. Oak Avenue]

[An Early Parade on N. Oak Avenue]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: A parade on N. Oak Avenue around the turn of the twentieth century is shown here. The Hexagon House (at the right center of the picture) was built in 1897, and a street car ran down the middle of the street from 1907 to 1913 (no tracks are visible here). Please observe the condition of the street. It was not paved until 1914. The Vichy Well drinking pavilion (later known as the Standard Well) is visible on the right skyline. This pavilion was torn down for the USO at the beginning of World War II. The large two-story building at the left middle of the picture was the Carlsbad Hotel.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Bicentennial Parade in Mineral Wells]

[The Bicentennial Parade in Mineral Wells]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: A float, with women dressed in period clothing, appeared in the April 4, 1976 "Time Was" Bicentennial Parade (commemorating the United States Bicentennial). The float commemorates several historical mineral-water drinking pavilions in Mineral Wells, including the Lithia, the Gibson, Lynch's mineral well, the Carlsbad, the Crazy, and the Hawthorne.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Crowd at a Race]

[A Crowd at a Race]

Date: 1910?
Creator: unknown
Description: A note on the back of the picture identifies this scene as being at Elmhurst Park. The rails on either side indicate that this is a photograph of a race track. There is a chalk circle in the middle of the track, and a companion picture shows this circle being used for shot-put/discus competition. The spectator in the left foreground is leaning into the track to get a better look at a runner approaching the finish line at the far end of the track.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Public Mineral Water Well]

[A Public Mineral Water Well]

Date: 1910?
Creator: unknown
Description: A picture that was used on the dust cover of A. F. Weaver's book, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", Second Edition, 1988 It is identified as "Visitors to Mineral Wells at 'Public Mineral Water Well' around 1910. The picture was furnished by Mrs. Raymond York. On left is Ellie Landry of Dallas. Second from right is Mrs. William Whitehead Gardner of Lawrence, Texas, grandmother of Raymond York of Mineral Wells." There were public drinking fountains in town where free water was available to visitors. This particular fountain's location remains unidentified. This picture appears, superficially, to be a duplicate of the previous one; but closer examination suggests that it is a composite picture, with the background being a painted backdrop.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Bicentennial Parade in Mineral Wells]

[The Bicentennial Parade in Mineral Wells]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: A float that appeared, among others, in the "Time was" Bicentennial parade, held on April 4, 1976. It depicts former mineral-water drinking spots in Mineral Wells. Ladies on the float represent customers at some of Mineral Wells' more popular one-time Spas. The wells depicted are: Lynch's discovery-well, the Crazy (Mineral Wells' third and namesake water well), the Gibson Well, the Carlsbad Well, and the Hawthorn Well.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Group Picture]

[A Group Picture]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: A picture of a large group of attendees at the Mineral Wells Annual Fair is shown. The picture was taken in the early 1900's at the Dance Pavilion at Elmhurst Park.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Mineral Wells Electric System Trolley Car]

[A Mineral Wells Electric System Trolley Car]

Date: 1907?/1913?
Creator: unknown
Description: A "Major" Beardsley, a Canadian who fought for Maine in the Civil War, was granted a franchise to construct a railway street system in 1906. He was also granted a 99-year franchise for the generation and sale of electricity in Mineral Wells. He also bought about 600 acres of land, and established three additions: Lowe Place addition, Lawn Place, Lawn Terrace, and Elmhurst Park, which came to sport a dance pavilion and a Casino. The panic of 1907 brought an end to the enterprise. Beardsley's trustee, a Mr. W.B. Smith,and the City of Mineral Wells, sued Beardsley's creditors. A judgment awarded Smith the sum of $15,000, and gave the City of Mineral Wells some sixty acres--which included Elmhurst Park. The legal battle continued beyond 1917, when the decision was reversed and remanded by the Court of Civil appeals for Texas. Number 23 trolley car is illustrated here.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
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