The North Texas Daily (Denton, Tex.), Vol. 63, No. 17, Ed. 1 Tuesday, October 2, 1979 Page: 5 of 8

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Tuesday, October 2,1970
THE NORTH TEXAS DAILY—PAGE 5
Sisters request
safety in suit
LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP)-There’s
one in Russia on a peace mission.
Another is a lobbyist in the Colorado
Legislature. Still another works on an
Indian reservation.
And together they’re taking on one
of the largest coal companies in the
south.
Like the Gulf Oil Corp. before it,
the Blue Diamond Coal Co. of Knox-
ville, Tenn., is finding out that the
Sisters of Loretto mean business.
The Sisters of Loretto, an order of
nuns founded 167 years ago in Ken-
tucky, want the coal company to be
more "socially responsible" in mine
safety, labor relations and pollution
control.
To that end, they filed suit Sept. I9
at Chancery Court in Wilmington,
Del., where Blue Diamond is
chartered
More than a year ago, the Sisters
quietly began buying what few shares
were available in the privately-held
company.
But Blue Diamond refused iu list
them as stockholders-of-record. It
also asked the Sisters to sign affida-
vits stating that they were not par-
ticipating in conspiracy against the
company.
In the suit, the order and 13 other
stock-holding religious groups and
social activists are seeking to be listed
as Blue Diamond stockholders and to
have the affidavit declared illegal.
For Blue Diamond, the stakes are
high. Should the company lose the
suit, there is a possibility that it
would have to open up its books to
public scrutiny for the first time in its
64-year history.
For the 735 Sisters of Loretto it’s
just one more in a long history of bat-
tles.
In 1812, three frontier teachers
founded the order in the middle of
Kentucky It was the first order
without lies to Europe established in
America.
The name, originally Friends of
Mary, was changed to honor a
famous shrine in Loretto, Italy. And,
as the frontier moved west, so did the
Sisters of Loretto.
Today they can be found working
as teachers, nurses, social workers
and activists in more than 20 states.
Although the headquarters was
moved to Denver in 1970, the Mother
House—the spiritual headquarters—
is still in tiny Nerinx, Ky., about 50
miles south of Louisville.
About 110 of the sisters, mostly
retired, live there surrounded by 300
acres of wooded farmland and 19th
century buildings.
“Our order isn’t very structured,”
said Sister Cecily Jones, communica-
tions director.
"The everyday routine is left up to
the individual. Most of the sisters live
in ordinary houses and wear ordinary
clothes, rather than habits."
The Sisters of Loretto were
reorganized in 1970 along democratic
lines. They elect a president every
four years and hold annual as-
semblies.
“Our history has given us a greater
need to change,” said Sister Mary
Swain, the order’s finance director.
"It’s part of the frontier tradition."
That frontier spirit has also
motivated the order to seek changes
in society.
In Dallas Call
750-0317
From Arlington &
Ft. Worth Call
338-1368
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Aid group
begins fall
campaign
NEW YORK (AP)—It is fall, and as
part of the American ritual, industry is
distributing United Way payroll deduc-
tion forms to its employees, the easier
for them to make their charitable con-
tributions.
Suppose you don’t give.
Will it matter that your refusal might
hinder promotion possibilities of your
boss, who heads the office effort?
Or might embarass the company
president, who heads the local UW
drive?
The United Way, or as they say, the
"put all your begs in one ask-it” ap-
proach, usually wins support from local
business because, among other things, it
supposedly ends the nuisance of
repeated requests.
Under UW aegis, local institutions are
allocated certain sums from one com-
munity appeal, generally led by a promi-
nent local executive whose charitable in-
stincts sometimes run second
PICNICING—Scott Lindgren, Denton junior, and a Pi Kappa Alpha pledge enjoy non-dorm food on the lawn in
front of tho Pikp House
Professor tracks history
of first troop movement
Texas was the site of the first troop
movement by motor vehicle in United
States history, said Dr. Douglas Starr of
the journalism faculty.
In a paper titled "A Texas First,"
written for WFAA Communications
Center in Dallas, Dr Starr draws upon
history texts and a personal account of
the historic venture as told to him by his
father, Ray W. Starr.
Ray Starr, a sergeant in the 2nd
Kansas Infantry of the National Guard,
was among those sent to Eagle Pass,
Teas in 1916 to help Gen. John Pershing
fight Pancho Villa.
Villa's troops were staging raids
across the Texas-Mexico border. For
weeks, Sgt. Starr’s company bivouacked
along the Rio Grand to discourage Villa.
But in the first week of September, the
1st and 2nd Infantries were recalled to
San Antonio, and an experiment in
military mobilization was under way.
Averaging nine miles per hour over
dirt paths that passed for roads, trucks
carrying two entire infantry units began
slowly rolling across South Texas. When
the trucks weren't stopped because of
some mechanical failure, the Texas sun
overheated the straining engines, forcing
more delays to cool them off. Unable to
travel after dark, the convoy bivouacked
each night.
Three days, 183 miles and countless
breakdowns later, the convoy arrived in
San Antonio.,
It took this first truck convoy
hours of running time to make a trip
that can today be made in four hours.
But the convoy was a sign of things to
come, l or a year later, when the U.S.
entered World War I, this type of troop
movement would become a cornerstone
of modern warfare
Legal service seeks clients
West Texas Legal Service, a program
that offers free legal advice in civil cases
to low income persons, is accepting
membership applicants for its client
council.
The council, which is open to stu-
dents, consists of clients or potential
clients, representatives of the client com-
munity and members of interested
groups or agencies who wish to ensure
proper and adequate legal aid to those
who cannot afford it. For membership,
call 383-1406.
“We want to get the people’s view of
legal problems here in the Denton area/'
Bonita Minor of the service staff said
"Our staff is limited in number and does
not see much of what is happening."
Two representatives from the council
will be elected to serve on the board in
Fort Worth that directs the operations
of WTLS, Minor said.
Yearly income, along with an inter-
view, will determine if one qualifies for
service. Income must he one-fourth
above poverty level, which is decided by
the U.S. Department of Labor.
Campus Calendar
Tuesday
3-5 p.m.
Services for Women and Returning
Students presents Dr Susan Van
6 p.m
"Yambu.” Latin ja/z concert, Bruce
Hall
Busk irk psychology (acuity, dis
cussing “Men. Women, and Stereo
types,’’ University Union,410
7 p.m
“Magic Flute," Lyceum, 50 cents
6-8 p m
Mortar Board parts. C oors
Distributor, l ake Dallas
7 p.m.
Ja/z Jam. RBL, free
8:15 p.m.
Contemporary, electronic and clas-
sical music concert by Dr Lee
Gibson, president of the International
7:30 p.m
Photography Club meeting, 305
Mounts, guest speaker \l Souza
Clarinet Society. Music Concert
Hall
7:45 p ni
la Causa meeting. University
Union 413. guest speaker Dr
Wednesday
Roland Vela. Denton city
councilman
10 am
Coffee with Jerry Moore. 8th floor.
First State Building, public invited
8 p.m.
“Oasis in Space.” with Bill
McDonald, diver and photographer
with the Cousteau Society. 1 yceum
Business and Professional Persons
noon
8 30 p ni
Mortar Board meeting.
2201 Stella No. 22
Luncheon, films of prior week’s
game. RBI , special meal and price
for luncheon
SA Offers
Voter Registration
REGISTER TO VOTE for all elections; city, state, and
national. It's simple to do; any afternoon just come up
to the Student Association office, located on the 4th
floor of the University Union. The registration will be
conducted by deputized Rules and Elections Director.
The last day to register will be Thursday, October 4.
For more information, call Jay at 788-2611, ext. 47.
The Student Association
Office is Open 1 p.m. -S p.m. Mon. -Fri.
cPtSfcious ©
Cargo
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at Home.
We Are Celebrating Our
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To thank you, our customers, for making
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on any item when you present the coupon below
Good thru Oct. 1-Oct. 6
Free Cup of Imported Coffee & Homemade Cookies
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Cook. Allan. The North Texas Daily (Denton, Tex.), Vol. 63, No. 17, Ed. 1 Tuesday, October 2, 1979, newspaper, October 2, 1979; Denton, TX. (https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth1002774/m1/5/ocr/: accessed May 28, 2020), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, https://texashistory.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Special Collections.

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