The Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association, Volume 7, July 1903 - April, 1904 Page: 214

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214 Texas Historical Association Quarterly.

THE REMINISCENCES OF MRS. DILUE HARRIS. III.1
Retrospection.
July 4, 1899.
Well, the fourth of July has come again and I am still here
to celebrate the day, aged seventy-four. Looking back, I remem-
ber many a fourth of July, some with pleasure, others with sor-
row. I was born in St. Louis, Missouri, in the year 1825. My
first remembrance of July the fourth was the year 1831. It was
a gala day-the militia marching, drums beating, flags flying,
public speaking and dining. I was kissed by Thomas H. Benton.
I remember the great senator well. He was afterwards at the
house of my father, Dr. P. W. Rose. One of my brothers was
named Thomas H. Benton; in after years I understood what it
meant.
The United States government was organizing an army to fight
the Indians. The next fourth of July was in a year of death and
sorrow to both old and young. The army that was sent against
the Indians under General Scott met with stubborn resistance from
the great Indian chief, Black Hawk, from April 26 to September
21, in the year '32. There was talk that cholera had broken out
in the army. In June five hundred German immigrants were
landed in St. Louis. The cholera that was brought in by the sol-
diers and Indians spread among the immigrants, and by the first
of August it was scattered through the town. The people began to
leave, and as everybody had visited the soldiers and Indians at Jef-
ferson Barracks, the cholera spread to the country, and finally all
over the United States. The deaths were awful. More than half
the Germans died. All business was suspended; steamboats ceased
coming; burying the dead and getting away from St. Louis was
all the people thought of doing. It was almost impossible to get
vehicles for the burials.
My father, Dr. P. W. Rose, had gone to the State of Mississippi
to a place near Vicksburg to practice medicine among the cotton
'See The Quarterly, IV 155-189.

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Texas State Historical Association. The Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association, Volume 7, July 1903 - April, 1904, periodical, 1904; Austin, Texas. (texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101030/m1/218/ocr/: accessed August 27, 2016), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, texashistory.unt.edu; crediting Texas State Historical Association.