The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 43, July 1939 - April, 1940 Page: 537

Book Reviews

founded and operated at Bonham, Texas, the author has made a
valuable addition to the history of education in Texas. The school
was typical of its day. Built around the personality of one man,
it influenced a large area of North and Northeast Texas and
trained many of the leaders of the Christian (Disciples) Church.
This work was presented as a thesis for the B. D. degree in the
Brite College of the Bible of Texas Christian University. The
published text follows the exact form of the original thesis. In a
few instances the long quotations grow monotonous. The volume
was evidently printed privately, since there is no imprint of any
nature. Dean Colby Hall's introduction is the only indication of
the date of the work.
T. R. HAVINS.
Howard Payne College.
Crime and Punishment in Early Maryland. By Raphael Semmes.
(Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins Press, 1938. Pp. v, 334.
$3.00.)
The reading of this book makes one well aware of the fact that
"man's inhumanity to man makes countless thousands mourn,"
which passage from Robert Burns the author has chosen as an
indicator to the reader that -he must be prepared to find that
some of the settlers in early Maryland were very inhuman in
their treatment of others. Punishment, too, was inhuman. The
passage from Burns is particularly apropos of the chapters on
servant discipline and punishment, on drunkenness, profanity,
witchcraft, and defamation. In general one gets the impres-
sion. that some of the early settlers of Maryland must have
been a sorry lot, no matter to what walk of life they belonged.
The historical truth, however, that Maryland grew up and suc-
ceeded as .a. colony is proof of the fact that the majority of its
early settlers must have been made of much better stuff than
those who got their names into the criminal records. The picture
of sordid conditions in Maryland which the book reveals makes
one wonder to what extent human depravity and weakness pre-
vailed in the early days of the other colonies.
Besides the three chapters mentioned above there are seven
others. The footnotes, fifty-seven pages of them, are placed in the

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 43, July 1939 - April, 1940, periodical, 1940; Austin, Texas. (texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101111/m1/573/ocr/: accessed October 22, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, texashistory.unt.edu; crediting Texas State Historical Association.