The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 56, July 1952 - April, 1953 Page: 455

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notes awd Docegtts
Colored eorge Crokham aid the Jidian
SituatioH i Zexras & 1847
Edited by MARTIN L. CRIMMINS
COLONEL George Croghan, patriot and hero of the War
of 1812, was inspector general of the United States Army
for nearly a quarter of a century. Born near Louisville,
Kentucky, on November 15, 1791, and educated at William and
Mary College, Croghan went on to a military career which added
honor to his illustrious ancestry. His father, William Croghan,
a native of Ireland, became a prominent planter in Virginia
and later in Kentucky after serving with distinction in the
Revolutionary War. His mother, Lucy Clark, was the sister of
George Rogers Clark, conqueror of the Old Northwest during
the American Revolution, and William Clark, explorer, Indian
agent, and governor of the Missouri Territory.
In March, 1812, Croghan received a commission in the Seven-
teenth United States Infantry with the rank of captain. His
brilliant service as aide-de-camp to General William Henry
Harrison in the battle of Tippecanoe won him a permanent
commission in the United States Army. Croghan soon demon-
strated that Harrison's confidence was not unjustified. He was
not yet twenty-one years old when his excellent defenses of Fort
Defiance and Fort Meigs prompted General Harrison to appoint
him commandant of Fort Stephenson in northern Ohio.,
With only a small number of troops and one cannon Croghan
successfully defended Fort Stephenson against an overwhelming
British force and its Indian allies. The young soldier's out-
standing success against great odds appealed to the hearts of
Americans at a time when reports of disgraceful inefficiency,
defeat, and surrender filled the public press. His display of
courage and ability was a heartening prelude to the victory
FFort Stephenson was also known as Fort Sandusky.

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 56, July 1952 - April, 1953, periodical, 1953; Austin, Texas. (texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101145/m1/527/ocr/: accessed September 29, 2016), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, texashistory.unt.edu; crediting Texas State Historical Association.