The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 56, July 1952 - April, 1953 Page: 480

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Southwestern Historical Quarterly

librarian, but he was not to have this position long, for he died
on May 15, 1883. However, the name of Gorgas has continued
to live and will continue to live in that university, because its
library carries the name, Gorgas Memorial Library.
RUDOLPH L. BIESELE
The University of Texas
The March of Empire: Frontier Defense in the Southwest,
1848-z860. By Averam B. Bender. Lawrence (University of
Kansas Press), 1952. Pp. 323. Illustrations and bibliography.
$5.00.
Army life on the vast trans-Mississippi frontier during the
period from 1848 to i86o has been the subject of numerous
narratives. Early-day army officers, such as W. T. Sherman, Philip
Sheridan, W. S. Hancock, N. A. Miles, and George Custer, have
added their memoirs and personal recollections. Travelers and
casual observers, like W. A. Bell, J. D. Billings, J. Ross Browne,
James S. Calhoun, R. A. Glisan, and J. W. Wilbarger, have made
available their accounts. Then most recently modern researchers
and writers, such as Frank C. Lockwood, Ralph Ogle, J. C. Malin,
William P. Morrison, W. C. Holden, William A. Ganoe, C. C.
Rister, and Paul I. Wellman, have come up with infinite minutia.
And now comes Averam B. Bender's The March of Empire
relating to the period from 1848 to 186o. Roughly, this book
may be divided into four parts. The first part describes the
region and its inhabitants and explains the evolution of the
army's defensive policy. Four chapters summarize the work of
the cavalry and infantry, of mapping lines of defense, of building
cantonment camps and permanent posts, of opening new trails
across what heretofore had been unexplored terrain, of the sur-
vey of rivers like the Red of Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Texas and
the Colorado of the Southwest, and of expeditions to plan
effective composite defense. Chapter VII, "Life of the Soldier
on the Frontier," is perhaps the most original, for it portrays the
soldier's day-by-day social experiences, a subject that is given
scant treatment by other writers. Then follows an interesting
account of the rising friction between the Interior and War
departments over western policies; of the degenerating influences

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 56, July 1952 - April, 1953, periodical, 1953; Austin, Texas. (texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101145/m1/552/ocr/: accessed September 30, 2016), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, texashistory.unt.edu; crediting Texas State Historical Association.