The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 59, July 1955 - April, 1956 Page: 252

This periodical is part of the collection entitled: Southwestern Historical Quarterly and was provided to The Portal to Texas History by the Texas State Historical Association.

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Iook Notes
The Kentucky Historical Society has had compiled a descriptive
and well indexed Guide to the manuscript collection now owned
by the Society or left on deposit with the Society. The object is to
make these holdings as serviceable as possible for reference use.
The manuscripts are arranged topically and in alphabetical se-
quence.
Texas materials included in the Guide are several letters from
Albert Triplett Burnley to Albert Sidney Johnston; six letters to
J. R. Alexander from his sons at Austin, Texas, concerning emi-
gration to Texas of "discontented and broken secessionists" 1866-
1868, Texas Statehood, courts, a new Union newspaper at Austin,
conditions in Mexico, 1868, and law enforcement in Texas. Cotton
production in 1868 is mentioned. A description of Texas, 1858, in
letters from members of the Gomme family to Reverend Phillip S.
Fall and Mrs. Fall is another item of interest in this collection.
CORAL H. TULLIS
The University of Texas
Two recent publications of the Naylor Company of San Antonio
should be of especial interest to Association members who follow
the work that is being done by writers of fiction in Texas and the
Southwest. Old Pro and Four Other Stories, by Jim A. McMullen,
is a collection of five short stories about hunting dogs and their
masters in East Texas. Written by a newspaperman who is well-
acquainted with both his subject and its setting, the stories have
received favorable comment for their general literary quality and
authenticity of detail. House of the Rancher, written by Mrs. May
Henderson Neatherlin, is a colorful account of ranch life in south-
ern New Mexico. Basically autobiographical, the novel is an
honest portrayal of a facet of the West in the twentieth century
that has been largely submerged under mountains of romantic
fictional misrepresentation.
For centuries the American Indian has been one of the most
persistent and controversial subjects of historical writing. The

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 59, July 1955 - April, 1956, periodical, 1956; Austin, Texas. (texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101162/m1/278/ocr/: accessed July 30, 2016), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, texashistory.unt.edu; crediting Texas State Historical Association.