The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 67, July 1963 - April, 1964 Page: 452

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The Map Collection of the Texas State Archives 1527-1900oo. Com-
piled by James M. Day and Ann B. Dunlap. Austin (Texas
State Library), 1962. Pp. 156. $3.00.
The Map Collection of the Texas State Archives 1527-1900,
compiled by James M. Day and Ann B. Dunlap, represents a
great deal of work and is a job that is long overdue. Of utmost
importance is the fact that this compilation makes available for
use by interested parties this valuable and varied collection. Any
map listed in the collection may be produced without any delay
by one of the Archives Researchers.
There is really no accurate method of appraising a map col-
lection. The purpose of a great collection, such as the Library
of Congress, is to have a copy of everything that has been pro-
duced if possible. Where originals are not available, reproduc-
tions are substituted. Other great collections, as for example the
John Carter Brown collection at Providence, Rhode Island,
stress the rare and unusual, or fine originals. As might be ex-
pected, because of limited funds and personnel in the past, the
Directors of the Archives have had to rely heavily upon repro-
ductions. In most instances, as far as students and researchers
are concerned, reproductions are as satisfactory as any.
The Archives collection is dated from 1527 to 1900, but, as a
matter of fact, there are no maps worthy of mention earlier than
the eighteenth century. For this period there are several maps
outlining the Gulf of Mexico which were made by the finest
mapmakers of the time. Special attention should be called to
maps 1009, 1489, 362, and 385 which were by Pierre Mortier,
Guillaume Del'Isle, John Senex, and Joh. Baptista Homanno.
All of these maps give a fairly accurate outline of the Gulf of
Mexico and the location of Cuba, the Yucatan and Florida Pen-
insulas, the bays of Pensacola and Mobile, the Mississippi River
and the Rio Grande. But there were no maps of this period
showing with any accuracy the outline and location of the islands
and bays of Texas and the various rivers in the state. The maps

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 67, July 1963 - April, 1964, periodical, 1964; Austin, Texas. (texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101197/m1/514/ocr/: accessed September 26, 2016), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, texashistory.unt.edu; crediting Texas State Historical Association.