The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 85, July 1981 - April, 1982 Page: 464

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Southwestern Historical Quarterly

publisher have, however, given us a worthwhile volume, one to read
and to keep for future reference.
University of Colorado ROBERT G. ATHEARN
Ten More Texans in Gray. Edited by W. C. Nunn. (Hillsboro, Tex.:
Hill Jr. College Press, 1980. Pp. xii+ 216. Preface, illustrations,
bibliography, index. $10.50.)
Ten More Texans in Gray offers short (fifteen-twenty pages each)
biographical sketches of a half-score prominent Texas soldiers who
served the Confederacy during the Civil War. Written by history
graduate students and edited by W. C. Nunn, all of Texas Christian
University, this volume follows Ten Texans in Gray (1968), also pre-
pared by a group of TCU students under the direction of Nunn. In-
cluded in this most recent work are brief accounts of the wartime
years of John S. Ford, Tom Green, Albert Sidney Johnston, Samuel B.
Maxey, Ben McCulloch, Oran M. Roberts, Sul Ross, Henry H. Sibley,
Benjamin F. Terry, and James W. Throckmorton.
As might well be expected from such a collection of fledgling his-
torians' work, the quality of the ten essays varies enormously. "Al-
bert Sidney Johnston," by Charles W. Porter, is written in a grace-
ful, literary, and sound academic style. Porter also exhibits a full com-
prehension of military tactics and strategy. Without a doubt, his essay
can serve as a model for other young writers of scholarly history.
On the other hand, several of the biographical accounts are seriously
flawed. Two are written in a stilted, rather sophomoric style, and
the footnotes and bibliography of one essay are in conflict. Half of
these accounts conclude with saccharine, annoying, eulogistic quotes
or epitaphs. In all fairness, however, the ten essays are well researched,
and each writer includes a standard but useful bibliography for his
subject.
For the professional historian or interested layman, excellent schol-
arly biographies of Johnston, Ford, and Throckmorton are available,
as are a veritable flood of articles and other appropriate primary and
secondary writings. Too, there exists an extensive body of literature
on the lesser personalities treated in this book. Nunn, however, has
been quite judicious in his selection of historical figures and choice of
writers; and he has assembled a collection of short biographical ac-
counts that will give younger readers and those unfamiliar with these

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 85, July 1981 - April, 1982, periodical, 1981/1982; Austin, Texas. (texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101208/m1/522/ocr/: accessed January 24, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, texashistory.unt.edu; crediting Texas State Historical Association.